City to clear select sidewalks

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton will have angels this year patrolling its streets and volunteering to help residents in need.

Politicians recently approved a $130,000 program that will see volunteers remove snow from sidewalks outside the homes of seniors and the physically challenged.

"There is a growing need within our community for this type of service," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson said he could see about 100 people in his neighbourhood applying for the program. Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla agreed, saying this program will benefit all residents across the new city.

"This is not just an urban issue," he said. "This is about providing dignity to seniors and to the physically challenged. The program is in the best interests of the city."

The city will establish eligibility requirements for residents to access the service.

VOLUNTEERS

Once public health staff identify their clients, volunteer organizations will be asked to provide people, called Snow Angels, to shovel snow from sidewalks.

"This is a really good program," said Hamilton councillor Chad Collins. "It will meet the demands of the people."

Joe Anne-Priel, general manager of Public and Social Health, said she will attempt to organize the snow clearing program by the end of January 2006.

Ever since Ancaster councillor Murray Ferguson fought to keep the sidewalk cleaning program operating in Ancaster after amalgamation, other councillors have wanted to have a similar program for the rest of the city.

Ancaster's sidewalk cleaning program is area-rated and costs residents about $6 per household every year.

If the city was to offer it city-wide it would cost residents between $6 to $8 million per year.

Merulla argued the funding for the program should be taken from the 2005 budget surplus, rather than wait for councillors to approve funding in the 2006 budget.

Merulla said winter would be finished if they waited for the 2006 budget to be approved by politicians.

The $130,000 will be used for the administrative costs of the city to establish eligibility requirements.

Other options politicians had to choose from included asking volunteers to help clear their neighbours' sidewalks, in a $30,000 education program, as well as a city coordinated program that contracted the service to a private business at a cost of $400,000.

City to clear select sidewalks

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton will have angels this year patrolling its streets and volunteering to help residents in need.

Politicians recently approved a $130,000 program that will see volunteers remove snow from sidewalks outside the homes of seniors and the physically challenged.

"There is a growing need within our community for this type of service," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson said he could see about 100 people in his neighbourhood applying for the program. Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla agreed, saying this program will benefit all residents across the new city.

"This is not just an urban issue," he said. "This is about providing dignity to seniors and to the physically challenged. The program is in the best interests of the city."

The city will establish eligibility requirements for residents to access the service.

VOLUNTEERS

Once public health staff identify their clients, volunteer organizations will be asked to provide people, called Snow Angels, to shovel snow from sidewalks.

"This is a really good program," said Hamilton councillor Chad Collins. "It will meet the demands of the people."

Joe Anne-Priel, general manager of Public and Social Health, said she will attempt to organize the snow clearing program by the end of January 2006.

Ever since Ancaster councillor Murray Ferguson fought to keep the sidewalk cleaning program operating in Ancaster after amalgamation, other councillors have wanted to have a similar program for the rest of the city.

Ancaster's sidewalk cleaning program is area-rated and costs residents about $6 per household every year.

If the city was to offer it city-wide it would cost residents between $6 to $8 million per year.

Merulla argued the funding for the program should be taken from the 2005 budget surplus, rather than wait for councillors to approve funding in the 2006 budget.

Merulla said winter would be finished if they waited for the 2006 budget to be approved by politicians.

The $130,000 will be used for the administrative costs of the city to establish eligibility requirements.

Other options politicians had to choose from included asking volunteers to help clear their neighbours' sidewalks, in a $30,000 education program, as well as a city coordinated program that contracted the service to a private business at a cost of $400,000.

City to clear select sidewalks

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton will have angels this year patrolling its streets and volunteering to help residents in need.

Politicians recently approved a $130,000 program that will see volunteers remove snow from sidewalks outside the homes of seniors and the physically challenged.

"There is a growing need within our community for this type of service," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson said he could see about 100 people in his neighbourhood applying for the program. Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla agreed, saying this program will benefit all residents across the new city.

"This is not just an urban issue," he said. "This is about providing dignity to seniors and to the physically challenged. The program is in the best interests of the city."

The city will establish eligibility requirements for residents to access the service.

VOLUNTEERS

Once public health staff identify their clients, volunteer organizations will be asked to provide people, called Snow Angels, to shovel snow from sidewalks.

"This is a really good program," said Hamilton councillor Chad Collins. "It will meet the demands of the people."

Joe Anne-Priel, general manager of Public and Social Health, said she will attempt to organize the snow clearing program by the end of January 2006.

Ever since Ancaster councillor Murray Ferguson fought to keep the sidewalk cleaning program operating in Ancaster after amalgamation, other councillors have wanted to have a similar program for the rest of the city.

Ancaster's sidewalk cleaning program is area-rated and costs residents about $6 per household every year.

If the city was to offer it city-wide it would cost residents between $6 to $8 million per year.

Merulla argued the funding for the program should be taken from the 2005 budget surplus, rather than wait for councillors to approve funding in the 2006 budget.

Merulla said winter would be finished if they waited for the 2006 budget to be approved by politicians.

The $130,000 will be used for the administrative costs of the city to establish eligibility requirements.

Other options politicians had to choose from included asking volunteers to help clear their neighbours' sidewalks, in a $30,000 education program, as well as a city coordinated program that contracted the service to a private business at a cost of $400,000.