A wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It's only common sense to have working smoke detectors on every level of your home. Now, that piece of common sense is becoming law, thanks to a recent amendment to the Ontario Fire Code.

In case you weren't aware, homeowners are already required to have alarms installed outside all sleeping areas. This amendment just takes it another step further to ensure that residents have ample opportunity to flee a fire if necessary.

It seems almost unthinkable that a homeowner or renter wouldn't have properly-installed smoke alarms on every level of their home. But ask any firefighter and they will be able to recite instances where they have found homes without any detectors or smoke alarms, batteries, or are disabled in some way.

Under the new amendment, municipal fire departments across Ontario will be enforcing the new regulations: for homeowners, tenants and individual landlords, non-compliance can result in a ticket for $235, or a fine of up to $25,000.

But why play with fire?

From November 1, 2004 to January 31, 2005 there were 35 fire-related fatalities.

Between 1995 and 2004, there were 609 fire-related deaths in Ontario. The province-wide fire statistics show that in almost half of those fires, the victims had no smoke alarms.

"If a fire were to occur in your home, smoke alarms could mean the difference between life and death," said Ontario Fire Marshal Bernard Moyle at the recent news conference to announce the amendment.

Judging by the numbers, Moyle knows what he is talking about.

Traditionally, this time of year is often marred by tragedy. Whether it is Christmas tree lights sparking a blaze or a forgotten candle igniting nearby combustibles, firefighters are called all too often to rescue victims and quell a raging fire.

The best present we could give our families in 2006 is a home fire safety plan that includes working smoke detectors.

The best present we can give the Fire Department is not to add to the already disturbing fire-related statistics.

A wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It's only common sense to have working smoke detectors on every level of your home. Now, that piece of common sense is becoming law, thanks to a recent amendment to the Ontario Fire Code.

In case you weren't aware, homeowners are already required to have alarms installed outside all sleeping areas. This amendment just takes it another step further to ensure that residents have ample opportunity to flee a fire if necessary.

It seems almost unthinkable that a homeowner or renter wouldn't have properly-installed smoke alarms on every level of their home. But ask any firefighter and they will be able to recite instances where they have found homes without any detectors or smoke alarms, batteries, or are disabled in some way.

Under the new amendment, municipal fire departments across Ontario will be enforcing the new regulations: for homeowners, tenants and individual landlords, non-compliance can result in a ticket for $235, or a fine of up to $25,000.

But why play with fire?

From November 1, 2004 to January 31, 2005 there were 35 fire-related fatalities.

Between 1995 and 2004, there were 609 fire-related deaths in Ontario. The province-wide fire statistics show that in almost half of those fires, the victims had no smoke alarms.

"If a fire were to occur in your home, smoke alarms could mean the difference between life and death," said Ontario Fire Marshal Bernard Moyle at the recent news conference to announce the amendment.

Judging by the numbers, Moyle knows what he is talking about.

Traditionally, this time of year is often marred by tragedy. Whether it is Christmas tree lights sparking a blaze or a forgotten candle igniting nearby combustibles, firefighters are called all too often to rescue victims and quell a raging fire.

The best present we could give our families in 2006 is a home fire safety plan that includes working smoke detectors.

The best present we can give the Fire Department is not to add to the already disturbing fire-related statistics.

A wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It's only common sense to have working smoke detectors on every level of your home. Now, that piece of common sense is becoming law, thanks to a recent amendment to the Ontario Fire Code.

In case you weren't aware, homeowners are already required to have alarms installed outside all sleeping areas. This amendment just takes it another step further to ensure that residents have ample opportunity to flee a fire if necessary.

It seems almost unthinkable that a homeowner or renter wouldn't have properly-installed smoke alarms on every level of their home. But ask any firefighter and they will be able to recite instances where they have found homes without any detectors or smoke alarms, batteries, or are disabled in some way.

Under the new amendment, municipal fire departments across Ontario will be enforcing the new regulations: for homeowners, tenants and individual landlords, non-compliance can result in a ticket for $235, or a fine of up to $25,000.

But why play with fire?

From November 1, 2004 to January 31, 2005 there were 35 fire-related fatalities.

Between 1995 and 2004, there were 609 fire-related deaths in Ontario. The province-wide fire statistics show that in almost half of those fires, the victims had no smoke alarms.

"If a fire were to occur in your home, smoke alarms could mean the difference between life and death," said Ontario Fire Marshal Bernard Moyle at the recent news conference to announce the amendment.

Judging by the numbers, Moyle knows what he is talking about.

Traditionally, this time of year is often marred by tragedy. Whether it is Christmas tree lights sparking a blaze or a forgotten candle igniting nearby combustibles, firefighters are called all too often to rescue victims and quell a raging fire.

The best present we could give our families in 2006 is a home fire safety plan that includes working smoke detectors.

The best present we can give the Fire Department is not to add to the already disturbing fire-related statistics.