Bryden almost jumps into the election race

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Former Liberal MP John Bryden almost stepped into the political fray by running as an Independent in the January 23 federal election.

"I was extremely tempted to do so," the Lynden resident confirmed Tuesday, admitting that he had begun to collect the 100 signatures required for nomination, but had a last-minute change of heart.

"I didn't want to be seen as the wild card that influences the decision for one of the other parties," he confided.

No matter what the outcome of the election, Bryden said he was concerned he "might be seen as an opportunist running on my name (recognition) only." He was also concerned that if elected as an Independent, he wouldn't be able to effectively drive change. "I couldn't see how I could accomplish what I wanted," he said, expressing a desire "to tie up some lose ends" on Access to Information issues and citizenship legislation.

Acknowledging that he "seriously intended to run" before Christmas, he said he experienced a change of heart over the Christmas break after he thought more about his decision. "As time moved on, it seemed less and less appealing."

"It's far better to have a nice clean election in this riding," Bryden said, alluding to the change in complexion his candidacy would likely have caused in the local race. "All the candidates have my best wishes," he said, predicting that the election in the ADFW riding will be "a cliffhanger."

Bryden made national headlines early in 2004 when he abruptly left the Liberal Party after Paul Martin succeeded Jean Chretien as Liberal Party leader and Prime Minister.

He later lost a bid to represent the Conservative Party during the June 2004 federal election.

For the past 17 months, the 62-year-old former MP who represented the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Aldershot riding for 11 years has been busy researching a book about Allied and German espionage during the Second World War. His research has taken him to London, Washington and Ottawa and has meant poring over books in English, French and German.

While Bryden is content writing books, he admits that the lure of politics remains strong.

"I was really tempted to be up there (in Parliament) during the national unity debate," he said, while talking about some of the issues which keep his interest in politics alive.

Bryden almost jumps into the election race

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Former Liberal MP John Bryden almost stepped into the political fray by running as an Independent in the January 23 federal election.

"I was extremely tempted to do so," the Lynden resident confirmed Tuesday, admitting that he had begun to collect the 100 signatures required for nomination, but had a last-minute change of heart.

"I didn't want to be seen as the wild card that influences the decision for one of the other parties," he confided.

No matter what the outcome of the election, Bryden said he was concerned he "might be seen as an opportunist running on my name (recognition) only." He was also concerned that if elected as an Independent, he wouldn't be able to effectively drive change. "I couldn't see how I could accomplish what I wanted," he said, expressing a desire "to tie up some lose ends" on Access to Information issues and citizenship legislation.

Acknowledging that he "seriously intended to run" before Christmas, he said he experienced a change of heart over the Christmas break after he thought more about his decision. "As time moved on, it seemed less and less appealing."

"It's far better to have a nice clean election in this riding," Bryden said, alluding to the change in complexion his candidacy would likely have caused in the local race. "All the candidates have my best wishes," he said, predicting that the election in the ADFW riding will be "a cliffhanger."

Bryden made national headlines early in 2004 when he abruptly left the Liberal Party after Paul Martin succeeded Jean Chretien as Liberal Party leader and Prime Minister.

He later lost a bid to represent the Conservative Party during the June 2004 federal election.

For the past 17 months, the 62-year-old former MP who represented the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Aldershot riding for 11 years has been busy researching a book about Allied and German espionage during the Second World War. His research has taken him to London, Washington and Ottawa and has meant poring over books in English, French and German.

While Bryden is content writing books, he admits that the lure of politics remains strong.

"I was really tempted to be up there (in Parliament) during the national unity debate," he said, while talking about some of the issues which keep his interest in politics alive.

Bryden almost jumps into the election race

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Former Liberal MP John Bryden almost stepped into the political fray by running as an Independent in the January 23 federal election.

"I was extremely tempted to do so," the Lynden resident confirmed Tuesday, admitting that he had begun to collect the 100 signatures required for nomination, but had a last-minute change of heart.

"I didn't want to be seen as the wild card that influences the decision for one of the other parties," he confided.

No matter what the outcome of the election, Bryden said he was concerned he "might be seen as an opportunist running on my name (recognition) only." He was also concerned that if elected as an Independent, he wouldn't be able to effectively drive change. "I couldn't see how I could accomplish what I wanted," he said, expressing a desire "to tie up some lose ends" on Access to Information issues and citizenship legislation.

Acknowledging that he "seriously intended to run" before Christmas, he said he experienced a change of heart over the Christmas break after he thought more about his decision. "As time moved on, it seemed less and less appealing."

"It's far better to have a nice clean election in this riding," Bryden said, alluding to the change in complexion his candidacy would likely have caused in the local race. "All the candidates have my best wishes," he said, predicting that the election in the ADFW riding will be "a cliffhanger."

Bryden made national headlines early in 2004 when he abruptly left the Liberal Party after Paul Martin succeeded Jean Chretien as Liberal Party leader and Prime Minister.

He later lost a bid to represent the Conservative Party during the June 2004 federal election.

For the past 17 months, the 62-year-old former MP who represented the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Aldershot riding for 11 years has been busy researching a book about Allied and German espionage during the Second World War. His research has taken him to London, Washington and Ottawa and has meant poring over books in English, French and German.

While Bryden is content writing books, he admits that the lure of politics remains strong.

"I was really tempted to be up there (in Parliament) during the national unity debate," he said, while talking about some of the issues which keep his interest in politics alive.