Poverty funding expected to last five years, but assistance still needed

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The half-million dollars that the multi-organizational Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction received from the city this month is expected to last for five years, said the city's general manager of public and social health.

"(The money) should last four to five years," said Joe-Anne Priel, who is also co-chair of the roundtable.

The city's public health department earned about $600,000 over the last few years from the provincial government by meeting targeted job placement goals, said Priel.

Over the last three years, the public health department has spent about $5 million on administrating the Ontario Works Enhancement Funds. The city would have lost the $600,000 if it had not allocated the money to the other programs by December 31, 2005.

Public health staff decided to provide $100,000 to the Hamilton Emergency Food Action Committee (HEFAC) and the other $500,000 to fund the recommendations coming from the poverty roundtable task force report is expected in March.

The HEFAC is composed of various community organizations, including Neighbour To Neighbour Centre, the Stoney Creek Food Bank, Good Shepherd and the Salvation Army.

Priel said the recommendations from the roundtable group will be "targeted" and "focused" to deliver the best results in the least amount of time.

"We want the biggest bang for our buck for our efforts," said Priel. "Some people will not be happy."

She wants the plan to be a "call to action" to the community, showing the city is doing all it can to assist Hamilton's poorest residents.

Members of council are expected to get a preliminary update on the progress made by the poverty roundtable sometime in February, said Priel.

'DOABLE PROGRAMS'

Hamilton Mayor Larry Di Ianni is hoping the task force's recommendations will do more than simply ask for more funding.

"We need to talk about economic development, creating strategies and involving the private sector to create doable programs," said Di Ianni. "(The recommendations) should be more than just a quest for unlimited cash. They should talk about early childhood education and bringing together some synergies among the agencies. We need to develop something that will make a difference and to measure those differences."

CITY HAS 100,000 POOR

Hamilton has about 100,000 people living below the poverty line, with 90,000 people among the working poor. City officials know a large portion of the poor are recent immigrants, Native Canadians, seniors, and children. Yet there is a gap among social service agencies and city officials' understanding of who these people are, why they became poor and how to resolve it.

"We are forgetting the stereotypes and are building our knowledge of the problem," said Priel. "We have been looking at what other communities are doing. And we are developing a common knowledge of the problem that will be incorporated into our community plan."

Priel is concerned Hamilton residents may see the $500,000 funding for the roundtable recommendations as enough money to satisfy demands. But she said that couldn't be further from the truth. She hopes people will continue to donate money, time, administrative help and continue to volunteer to make the recommendations a success.

"Any type of resources are welcome," she said.

Poverty funding expected to last five years, but assistance still needed

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The half-million dollars that the multi-organizational Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction received from the city this month is expected to last for five years, said the city's general manager of public and social health.

"(The money) should last four to five years," said Joe-Anne Priel, who is also co-chair of the roundtable.

The city's public health department earned about $600,000 over the last few years from the provincial government by meeting targeted job placement goals, said Priel.

Over the last three years, the public health department has spent about $5 million on administrating the Ontario Works Enhancement Funds. The city would have lost the $600,000 if it had not allocated the money to the other programs by December 31, 2005.

Public health staff decided to provide $100,000 to the Hamilton Emergency Food Action Committee (HEFAC) and the other $500,000 to fund the recommendations coming from the poverty roundtable task force report is expected in March.

The HEFAC is composed of various community organizations, including Neighbour To Neighbour Centre, the Stoney Creek Food Bank, Good Shepherd and the Salvation Army.

Priel said the recommendations from the roundtable group will be "targeted" and "focused" to deliver the best results in the least amount of time.

"We want the biggest bang for our buck for our efforts," said Priel. "Some people will not be happy."

She wants the plan to be a "call to action" to the community, showing the city is doing all it can to assist Hamilton's poorest residents.

Members of council are expected to get a preliminary update on the progress made by the poverty roundtable sometime in February, said Priel.

'DOABLE PROGRAMS'

Hamilton Mayor Larry Di Ianni is hoping the task force's recommendations will do more than simply ask for more funding.

"We need to talk about economic development, creating strategies and involving the private sector to create doable programs," said Di Ianni. "(The recommendations) should be more than just a quest for unlimited cash. They should talk about early childhood education and bringing together some synergies among the agencies. We need to develop something that will make a difference and to measure those differences."

CITY HAS 100,000 POOR

Hamilton has about 100,000 people living below the poverty line, with 90,000 people among the working poor. City officials know a large portion of the poor are recent immigrants, Native Canadians, seniors, and children. Yet there is a gap among social service agencies and city officials' understanding of who these people are, why they became poor and how to resolve it.

"We are forgetting the stereotypes and are building our knowledge of the problem," said Priel. "We have been looking at what other communities are doing. And we are developing a common knowledge of the problem that will be incorporated into our community plan."

Priel is concerned Hamilton residents may see the $500,000 funding for the roundtable recommendations as enough money to satisfy demands. But she said that couldn't be further from the truth. She hopes people will continue to donate money, time, administrative help and continue to volunteer to make the recommendations a success.

"Any type of resources are welcome," she said.

Poverty funding expected to last five years, but assistance still needed

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The half-million dollars that the multi-organizational Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction received from the city this month is expected to last for five years, said the city's general manager of public and social health.

"(The money) should last four to five years," said Joe-Anne Priel, who is also co-chair of the roundtable.

The city's public health department earned about $600,000 over the last few years from the provincial government by meeting targeted job placement goals, said Priel.

Over the last three years, the public health department has spent about $5 million on administrating the Ontario Works Enhancement Funds. The city would have lost the $600,000 if it had not allocated the money to the other programs by December 31, 2005.

Public health staff decided to provide $100,000 to the Hamilton Emergency Food Action Committee (HEFAC) and the other $500,000 to fund the recommendations coming from the poverty roundtable task force report is expected in March.

The HEFAC is composed of various community organizations, including Neighbour To Neighbour Centre, the Stoney Creek Food Bank, Good Shepherd and the Salvation Army.

Priel said the recommendations from the roundtable group will be "targeted" and "focused" to deliver the best results in the least amount of time.

"We want the biggest bang for our buck for our efforts," said Priel. "Some people will not be happy."

She wants the plan to be a "call to action" to the community, showing the city is doing all it can to assist Hamilton's poorest residents.

Members of council are expected to get a preliminary update on the progress made by the poverty roundtable sometime in February, said Priel.

'DOABLE PROGRAMS'

Hamilton Mayor Larry Di Ianni is hoping the task force's recommendations will do more than simply ask for more funding.

"We need to talk about economic development, creating strategies and involving the private sector to create doable programs," said Di Ianni. "(The recommendations) should be more than just a quest for unlimited cash. They should talk about early childhood education and bringing together some synergies among the agencies. We need to develop something that will make a difference and to measure those differences."

CITY HAS 100,000 POOR

Hamilton has about 100,000 people living below the poverty line, with 90,000 people among the working poor. City officials know a large portion of the poor are recent immigrants, Native Canadians, seniors, and children. Yet there is a gap among social service agencies and city officials' understanding of who these people are, why they became poor and how to resolve it.

"We are forgetting the stereotypes and are building our knowledge of the problem," said Priel. "We have been looking at what other communities are doing. And we are developing a common knowledge of the problem that will be incorporated into our community plan."

Priel is concerned Hamilton residents may see the $500,000 funding for the roundtable recommendations as enough money to satisfy demands. But she said that couldn't be further from the truth. She hopes people will continue to donate money, time, administrative help and continue to volunteer to make the recommendations a success.

"Any type of resources are welcome," she said.