McCarthy to run again in Ward 15

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Margaret McCarthy has some unfinished business at city hall.

That's why the veteran Flamborough councillor came out of the gate early and this week announced her decision to add her name to the list of candidates in this November's municipal election.

Nominations officially opened on January 3, but anyone interested in running in any of the 15 wards in the city has until 5 p.m. on Friday, September 29 to throw their hat into the ring.

There had been speculation that McCarthy, first elected to Flamborough council in 1994, would not run again.

"That's why I'm coming in early, I'm squashing those rumours," she said in an exclusive interview with the Review early this week. "I have never said I wasn't running."

McCarthy feels that the issues facing Flamborough in future years are wide-ranging and "historically bigger" and more complex than those in other municipalities of like size. Amalgamation, impending residential development under OPA 28, the development of transportation networks and big-box complexes at Clappison's Corners are some of the issues she has been involved with over the past 12 years, and would like to see through.

"That's just the tip of it, then there are the myriad of issues in normal day-to-day business," she said. "These are the outstanding, long-term issues that in my view need a memory of history - which I bring.

"If I wanted to get out of politics, I wouldn't feel comfortable doing so at this point in time. And quite honestly I don't want to."

McCarthy feels the biggest strength she brings to the council table is her penchant for research.

"That's how my weekends are spent, researching," she noted, adding that her council colleagues have dubbed her "Doctor" for her extensive studies. "I loved university, always, and study comes easy for me."

Dovetailing with her passion for learning, she says she has discovered a knack for running meetings.

"I like chairing meetings, and I'm a very good chair person," she said. "I get a tremendous sense of satisfaction from chairing; you have to be able to answer all the hardest questions, you have to be able to entertain the questions and know what your answers are going to be."

Despite a council career that has now spanned two municipal governments, McCarthy maintains that she "is not political." And she admits that her strategy of voting her conscience is not always going to work in her favour.

"I lose votes for some of my decisions," she said. "But people need to know where I stand. It's more of an injustice not to make a decision."

One recent example is the council vote on Hamilton's Commonwealth Games bid: the wish from city hall, she said, was to have a unanimous result. McCarthy then requested a standing vote, and proceeded to go on record against the bid.

"I'm very outspoken," she said, adding that people will never be in doubt about where she stands on an issue. That, she concedes, stirs up some strong feelings - good and bad.

"There are not too many people that are lukewarm about me," she laughed.

Heading into the election, McCarthy has several high-profile projects coming to fruition, including upgrades to Carlisle's communal well system slated to come online before the summer and the redesign of Memorial Park (including the installation of a splash pad and the construction of new washrooms and a skate park). She's also been working to secure the funding from city hall to get started on a twin pad arena, and indicates that $8 million dollars is slated for the project in next year's budget.

But she's not going to rest on any laurels - a mistake she says she made in the 2003 election, which she won by just 600 votes.

"I depended on my record to carry me through, and to a great extent it did," McCarthy said. "My campaigning was minimal and (the result) was closer than it would have been if I'd seriously gone out and campaigned."

McCarthy shrugs off any question of running for provincial or federal office, picking up a familiar mantra:

"I am totally self-funded, so federal and provincial politics, for me would require fundraising - something I've never done and am extremely uncomfortable with.

"I go under my own steam and I owe nobody, but I represent everyone. I do not, will not and have chosen not to kow-tow to special interest groups, political lobbyists or developers. I'm proud and grateful that I've come this far under my own steam."

Covering the tens of thousands of dollars that a municipal campaign can eat up, she jokes, means she's definitely not in politics for the money. And even if other levels of government were an option, she enjoys the immediacy of working at the city level.

"Municipal politics is so personal to people and it's the closest to the people," she noted. "But I get calls for all of it, federal, provincial and municipal, because people know me."

And while she admits that being on the hotseat is demanding, she's never considered going into another line of work.

"Good or bad, this is my job. It's what I know, and what I believe I'm good at."

Once McCarthy submits her nomination form, she will be the first in Ward 15 to do so. In Ward 14 (west Flamborough) no nominations have been published. Keith Beck and perennial candidate Michael Baldasaro have already declared their intentions to run for the mayor's seat and wards 3, 4, 6 and 7 each have one candidate listed so far.

Further details on the November 13 election are available online at at www.myhamilton/CityandGovernment/CityDepartments/CorporateServices/Clerks/MunicipalElection.

According to the City Clerk's office, the page is updated daily.

McCarthy to run again in Ward 15

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Margaret McCarthy has some unfinished business at city hall.

That's why the veteran Flamborough councillor came out of the gate early and this week announced her decision to add her name to the list of candidates in this November's municipal election.

Nominations officially opened on January 3, but anyone interested in running in any of the 15 wards in the city has until 5 p.m. on Friday, September 29 to throw their hat into the ring.

There had been speculation that McCarthy, first elected to Flamborough council in 1994, would not run again.

"That's why I'm coming in early, I'm squashing those rumours," she said in an exclusive interview with the Review early this week. "I have never said I wasn't running."

McCarthy feels that the issues facing Flamborough in future years are wide-ranging and "historically bigger" and more complex than those in other municipalities of like size. Amalgamation, impending residential development under OPA 28, the development of transportation networks and big-box complexes at Clappison's Corners are some of the issues she has been involved with over the past 12 years, and would like to see through.

"That's just the tip of it, then there are the myriad of issues in normal day-to-day business," she said. "These are the outstanding, long-term issues that in my view need a memory of history - which I bring.

"If I wanted to get out of politics, I wouldn't feel comfortable doing so at this point in time. And quite honestly I don't want to."

McCarthy feels the biggest strength she brings to the council table is her penchant for research.

"That's how my weekends are spent, researching," she noted, adding that her council colleagues have dubbed her "Doctor" for her extensive studies. "I loved university, always, and study comes easy for me."

Dovetailing with her passion for learning, she says she has discovered a knack for running meetings.

"I like chairing meetings, and I'm a very good chair person," she said. "I get a tremendous sense of satisfaction from chairing; you have to be able to answer all the hardest questions, you have to be able to entertain the questions and know what your answers are going to be."

Despite a council career that has now spanned two municipal governments, McCarthy maintains that she "is not political." And she admits that her strategy of voting her conscience is not always going to work in her favour.

"I lose votes for some of my decisions," she said. "But people need to know where I stand. It's more of an injustice not to make a decision."

One recent example is the council vote on Hamilton's Commonwealth Games bid: the wish from city hall, she said, was to have a unanimous result. McCarthy then requested a standing vote, and proceeded to go on record against the bid.

"I'm very outspoken," she said, adding that people will never be in doubt about where she stands on an issue. That, she concedes, stirs up some strong feelings - good and bad.

"There are not too many people that are lukewarm about me," she laughed.

Heading into the election, McCarthy has several high-profile projects coming to fruition, including upgrades to Carlisle's communal well system slated to come online before the summer and the redesign of Memorial Park (including the installation of a splash pad and the construction of new washrooms and a skate park). She's also been working to secure the funding from city hall to get started on a twin pad arena, and indicates that $8 million dollars is slated for the project in next year's budget.

But she's not going to rest on any laurels - a mistake she says she made in the 2003 election, which she won by just 600 votes.

"I depended on my record to carry me through, and to a great extent it did," McCarthy said. "My campaigning was minimal and (the result) was closer than it would have been if I'd seriously gone out and campaigned."

McCarthy shrugs off any question of running for provincial or federal office, picking up a familiar mantra:

"I am totally self-funded, so federal and provincial politics, for me would require fundraising - something I've never done and am extremely uncomfortable with.

"I go under my own steam and I owe nobody, but I represent everyone. I do not, will not and have chosen not to kow-tow to special interest groups, political lobbyists or developers. I'm proud and grateful that I've come this far under my own steam."

Covering the tens of thousands of dollars that a municipal campaign can eat up, she jokes, means she's definitely not in politics for the money. And even if other levels of government were an option, she enjoys the immediacy of working at the city level.

"Municipal politics is so personal to people and it's the closest to the people," she noted. "But I get calls for all of it, federal, provincial and municipal, because people know me."

And while she admits that being on the hotseat is demanding, she's never considered going into another line of work.

"Good or bad, this is my job. It's what I know, and what I believe I'm good at."

Once McCarthy submits her nomination form, she will be the first in Ward 15 to do so. In Ward 14 (west Flamborough) no nominations have been published. Keith Beck and perennial candidate Michael Baldasaro have already declared their intentions to run for the mayor's seat and wards 3, 4, 6 and 7 each have one candidate listed so far.

Further details on the November 13 election are available online at at www.myhamilton/CityandGovernment/CityDepartments/CorporateServices/Clerks/MunicipalElection.

According to the City Clerk's office, the page is updated daily.

McCarthy to run again in Ward 15

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Margaret McCarthy has some unfinished business at city hall.

That's why the veteran Flamborough councillor came out of the gate early and this week announced her decision to add her name to the list of candidates in this November's municipal election.

Nominations officially opened on January 3, but anyone interested in running in any of the 15 wards in the city has until 5 p.m. on Friday, September 29 to throw their hat into the ring.

There had been speculation that McCarthy, first elected to Flamborough council in 1994, would not run again.

"That's why I'm coming in early, I'm squashing those rumours," she said in an exclusive interview with the Review early this week. "I have never said I wasn't running."

McCarthy feels that the issues facing Flamborough in future years are wide-ranging and "historically bigger" and more complex than those in other municipalities of like size. Amalgamation, impending residential development under OPA 28, the development of transportation networks and big-box complexes at Clappison's Corners are some of the issues she has been involved with over the past 12 years, and would like to see through.

"That's just the tip of it, then there are the myriad of issues in normal day-to-day business," she said. "These are the outstanding, long-term issues that in my view need a memory of history - which I bring.

"If I wanted to get out of politics, I wouldn't feel comfortable doing so at this point in time. And quite honestly I don't want to."

McCarthy feels the biggest strength she brings to the council table is her penchant for research.

"That's how my weekends are spent, researching," she noted, adding that her council colleagues have dubbed her "Doctor" for her extensive studies. "I loved university, always, and study comes easy for me."

Dovetailing with her passion for learning, she says she has discovered a knack for running meetings.

"I like chairing meetings, and I'm a very good chair person," she said. "I get a tremendous sense of satisfaction from chairing; you have to be able to answer all the hardest questions, you have to be able to entertain the questions and know what your answers are going to be."

Despite a council career that has now spanned two municipal governments, McCarthy maintains that she "is not political." And she admits that her strategy of voting her conscience is not always going to work in her favour.

"I lose votes for some of my decisions," she said. "But people need to know where I stand. It's more of an injustice not to make a decision."

One recent example is the council vote on Hamilton's Commonwealth Games bid: the wish from city hall, she said, was to have a unanimous result. McCarthy then requested a standing vote, and proceeded to go on record against the bid.

"I'm very outspoken," she said, adding that people will never be in doubt about where she stands on an issue. That, she concedes, stirs up some strong feelings - good and bad.

"There are not too many people that are lukewarm about me," she laughed.

Heading into the election, McCarthy has several high-profile projects coming to fruition, including upgrades to Carlisle's communal well system slated to come online before the summer and the redesign of Memorial Park (including the installation of a splash pad and the construction of new washrooms and a skate park). She's also been working to secure the funding from city hall to get started on a twin pad arena, and indicates that $8 million dollars is slated for the project in next year's budget.

But she's not going to rest on any laurels - a mistake she says she made in the 2003 election, which she won by just 600 votes.

"I depended on my record to carry me through, and to a great extent it did," McCarthy said. "My campaigning was minimal and (the result) was closer than it would have been if I'd seriously gone out and campaigned."

McCarthy shrugs off any question of running for provincial or federal office, picking up a familiar mantra:

"I am totally self-funded, so federal and provincial politics, for me would require fundraising - something I've never done and am extremely uncomfortable with.

"I go under my own steam and I owe nobody, but I represent everyone. I do not, will not and have chosen not to kow-tow to special interest groups, political lobbyists or developers. I'm proud and grateful that I've come this far under my own steam."

Covering the tens of thousands of dollars that a municipal campaign can eat up, she jokes, means she's definitely not in politics for the money. And even if other levels of government were an option, she enjoys the immediacy of working at the city level.

"Municipal politics is so personal to people and it's the closest to the people," she noted. "But I get calls for all of it, federal, provincial and municipal, because people know me."

And while she admits that being on the hotseat is demanding, she's never considered going into another line of work.

"Good or bad, this is my job. It's what I know, and what I believe I'm good at."

Once McCarthy submits her nomination form, she will be the first in Ward 15 to do so. In Ward 14 (west Flamborough) no nominations have been published. Keith Beck and perennial candidate Michael Baldasaro have already declared their intentions to run for the mayor's seat and wards 3, 4, 6 and 7 each have one candidate listed so far.

Further details on the November 13 election are available online at at www.myhamilton/CityandGovernment/CityDepartments/CorporateServices/Clerks/MunicipalElection.

According to the City Clerk's office, the page is updated daily.