Can a New Year mean a new you?

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How to make your New Year's resolutions stick longer than your holiday pounds

Does this scene seem familiar: January 1st, sitting around the dinner table sharing your grand plans for the New Year with family and friends? Does your plan include some New Year's resolutions? Do you remember what last year's were? Are they the same this year?

It is interesting (but not surprising) that the top New Year's resolution is to get in shape or to lose weight (it's mine too). Working on ourselves is at the forefront of our good intentions, but it's the first thing to get dropped in our busy lifestyles.

How do you work towards achieving your New Year's resolution? The same way you work towards your goals at work or school: you set the goal, decide on a measurable outcome, and list the steps it will take to reach the goal (may require some research).

And understanding what may be keeping you from reaching your goals may be one of the keys to success.

If your New Year's resolution is to lose weight or get in shape, decide on exactly what it is you want to do.

If you want to lose 50 pounds, decide on how you are going to lose the first five. Diets indicate a start and end date so it is important to consider this a lifestyle change.

Feeling successful is the greatest motivator, so if you start with a reasonable goal, such as walking for 20 minutes, three times per week, you are more likely to feel successful than if you set out to run for 60 minutes every day. The latter is achievable but will be gradual.

The key to becoming - and staying - active is to make exercise fun. If you are like me and you don't like to run, perhaps an aerobics class will suit your fancy.

Walking is one of the best exercises you can do and it's a great way to start. For people who like team sports, join a sport league; many communities offer adult leagues and this is a great way to meet new people.

Working out with a partner is often more enjoyable than doing it on your own, and you can rely on each other for motivation. Being accountable to someone else also makes you more likely to stick with it.

Personal training is a great way to realize your goals. Research indicates that people who work out with a personal trainer are more successful in meeting their goals.

Personal trainers help you to exercise properly and they keep track of your progress (you can even train with a friend, which is often a cheaper option).

It can be very motivational to know that your cardiovascular system is improving or your muscle tone is changing, as you do not always see the results of exercise in those first few weeks.

It is the first few weeks that will determine if you are going to stick with your plan.

What will keep us from reaching our goals? It is important to know the "trigger(s)" that can make our plans fail.

The most common is being too busy; work and other stuff will get in the way so part of our plan should take into account these "triggers." If somehow you stop, you can always start again.

Make exercise fun, set attainable goals in order to feel successful, and understand your "triggers."

Remember that when we start an exercise program, we are likely to gain a little weight before we start losing it as the muscle we are building and toning weighs more than the fat we are losing.

Don't give up. Weight loss will come, it might just take a bit of time. After all, we are worth it.

Can a New Year mean a new you?

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How to make your New Year's resolutions stick longer than your holiday pounds

Does this scene seem familiar: January 1st, sitting around the dinner table sharing your grand plans for the New Year with family and friends? Does your plan include some New Year's resolutions? Do you remember what last year's were? Are they the same this year?

It is interesting (but not surprising) that the top New Year's resolution is to get in shape or to lose weight (it's mine too). Working on ourselves is at the forefront of our good intentions, but it's the first thing to get dropped in our busy lifestyles.

How do you work towards achieving your New Year's resolution? The same way you work towards your goals at work or school: you set the goal, decide on a measurable outcome, and list the steps it will take to reach the goal (may require some research).

And understanding what may be keeping you from reaching your goals may be one of the keys to success.

If your New Year's resolution is to lose weight or get in shape, decide on exactly what it is you want to do.

If you want to lose 50 pounds, decide on how you are going to lose the first five. Diets indicate a start and end date so it is important to consider this a lifestyle change.

Feeling successful is the greatest motivator, so if you start with a reasonable goal, such as walking for 20 minutes, three times per week, you are more likely to feel successful than if you set out to run for 60 minutes every day. The latter is achievable but will be gradual.

The key to becoming - and staying - active is to make exercise fun. If you are like me and you don't like to run, perhaps an aerobics class will suit your fancy.

Walking is one of the best exercises you can do and it's a great way to start. For people who like team sports, join a sport league; many communities offer adult leagues and this is a great way to meet new people.

Working out with a partner is often more enjoyable than doing it on your own, and you can rely on each other for motivation. Being accountable to someone else also makes you more likely to stick with it.

Personal training is a great way to realize your goals. Research indicates that people who work out with a personal trainer are more successful in meeting their goals.

Personal trainers help you to exercise properly and they keep track of your progress (you can even train with a friend, which is often a cheaper option).

It can be very motivational to know that your cardiovascular system is improving or your muscle tone is changing, as you do not always see the results of exercise in those first few weeks.

It is the first few weeks that will determine if you are going to stick with your plan.

What will keep us from reaching our goals? It is important to know the "trigger(s)" that can make our plans fail.

The most common is being too busy; work and other stuff will get in the way so part of our plan should take into account these "triggers." If somehow you stop, you can always start again.

Make exercise fun, set attainable goals in order to feel successful, and understand your "triggers."

Remember that when we start an exercise program, we are likely to gain a little weight before we start losing it as the muscle we are building and toning weighs more than the fat we are losing.

Don't give up. Weight loss will come, it might just take a bit of time. After all, we are worth it.

Can a New Year mean a new you?

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How to make your New Year's resolutions stick longer than your holiday pounds

Does this scene seem familiar: January 1st, sitting around the dinner table sharing your grand plans for the New Year with family and friends? Does your plan include some New Year's resolutions? Do you remember what last year's were? Are they the same this year?

It is interesting (but not surprising) that the top New Year's resolution is to get in shape or to lose weight (it's mine too). Working on ourselves is at the forefront of our good intentions, but it's the first thing to get dropped in our busy lifestyles.

How do you work towards achieving your New Year's resolution? The same way you work towards your goals at work or school: you set the goal, decide on a measurable outcome, and list the steps it will take to reach the goal (may require some research).

And understanding what may be keeping you from reaching your goals may be one of the keys to success.

If your New Year's resolution is to lose weight or get in shape, decide on exactly what it is you want to do.

If you want to lose 50 pounds, decide on how you are going to lose the first five. Diets indicate a start and end date so it is important to consider this a lifestyle change.

Feeling successful is the greatest motivator, so if you start with a reasonable goal, such as walking for 20 minutes, three times per week, you are more likely to feel successful than if you set out to run for 60 minutes every day. The latter is achievable but will be gradual.

The key to becoming - and staying - active is to make exercise fun. If you are like me and you don't like to run, perhaps an aerobics class will suit your fancy.

Walking is one of the best exercises you can do and it's a great way to start. For people who like team sports, join a sport league; many communities offer adult leagues and this is a great way to meet new people.

Working out with a partner is often more enjoyable than doing it on your own, and you can rely on each other for motivation. Being accountable to someone else also makes you more likely to stick with it.

Personal training is a great way to realize your goals. Research indicates that people who work out with a personal trainer are more successful in meeting their goals.

Personal trainers help you to exercise properly and they keep track of your progress (you can even train with a friend, which is often a cheaper option).

It can be very motivational to know that your cardiovascular system is improving or your muscle tone is changing, as you do not always see the results of exercise in those first few weeks.

It is the first few weeks that will determine if you are going to stick with your plan.

What will keep us from reaching our goals? It is important to know the "trigger(s)" that can make our plans fail.

The most common is being too busy; work and other stuff will get in the way so part of our plan should take into account these "triggers." If somehow you stop, you can always start again.

Make exercise fun, set attainable goals in order to feel successful, and understand your "triggers."

Remember that when we start an exercise program, we are likely to gain a little weight before we start losing it as the muscle we are building and toning weighs more than the fat we are losing.

Don't give up. Weight loss will come, it might just take a bit of time. After all, we are worth it.