Honour veterans' sacrifice: vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

During the Year of the Veteran (2005), Canadians heard a great deal about freedom and our way of life.

A study of voter participation commencing with the first election following the war in Europe (June 1945) indicates a strong influence from veterans and their families during federal elections.

Historically, many veterans continue to live by the oath of allegiance, mandatory upon joining the Armed Forces. This may have led to a desire for strong representation by veterans in respect of federal elections.

Voter turnout, however, has declined alarmingly in the past ten years. This might, in part, be attributed to diminished numbers of veterans with the passage of time.

Canadians at large, who have shown strong support in recent years, should now make a determined effort to show that veterans really matter. Accordingly, the organizations represented in the 55-member National Council of Veteran Associations urge that Canadians carry out their civic duty at election time thereby honouring the sacrifice of our ex-military.

H. Clifford Chadderton

National Council of Veteran Associations

Honour veterans' sacrifice: vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

During the Year of the Veteran (2005), Canadians heard a great deal about freedom and our way of life.

A study of voter participation commencing with the first election following the war in Europe (June 1945) indicates a strong influence from veterans and their families during federal elections.

Historically, many veterans continue to live by the oath of allegiance, mandatory upon joining the Armed Forces. This may have led to a desire for strong representation by veterans in respect of federal elections.

Voter turnout, however, has declined alarmingly in the past ten years. This might, in part, be attributed to diminished numbers of veterans with the passage of time.

Canadians at large, who have shown strong support in recent years, should now make a determined effort to show that veterans really matter. Accordingly, the organizations represented in the 55-member National Council of Veteran Associations urge that Canadians carry out their civic duty at election time thereby honouring the sacrifice of our ex-military.

H. Clifford Chadderton

National Council of Veteran Associations

Honour veterans' sacrifice: vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

During the Year of the Veteran (2005), Canadians heard a great deal about freedom and our way of life.

A study of voter participation commencing with the first election following the war in Europe (June 1945) indicates a strong influence from veterans and their families during federal elections.

Historically, many veterans continue to live by the oath of allegiance, mandatory upon joining the Armed Forces. This may have led to a desire for strong representation by veterans in respect of federal elections.

Voter turnout, however, has declined alarmingly in the past ten years. This might, in part, be attributed to diminished numbers of veterans with the passage of time.

Canadians at large, who have shown strong support in recent years, should now make a determined effort to show that veterans really matter. Accordingly, the organizations represented in the 55-member National Council of Veteran Associations urge that Canadians carry out their civic duty at election time thereby honouring the sacrifice of our ex-military.

H. Clifford Chadderton

National Council of Veteran Associations