Education, enforcement needed to put teeth into anti-idling by-law

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You could soon be ticketed for idling your vehicle in along Hamilton streets - or even in your driveway.

Politicians approved an anti-idling policy last week that could take effect in June. But some councillors were reluctant to spend the money required to enforce the legislation and instead wanted to educate the community first through an awareness campaign.

Members of the Planning and Economic Development committee approved the new policy, but referred the estimated $130,000 cost to hire and train a new bylaw officer to enforce the legislation to the city's budget committee for debate.

Stoney Creek councillor Dave Mitchell rejected spending the $130,000 to enforce yet another bylaw.

"We can't support the ones we have now," he said. "I can't support adding another bylaw and drive the costs up. I'm in favour of an education program."

He agreed with Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina that if parking enforcement staff see vehicles idling, they should be authorized to issue notices identifying that they are in violation of the city's idling bylaw.

"I would rather do things that are voluntary," said Mitchell. "We don't need a bylaw for our overworked staff."

City staff have been reviewing the implications of establishing an anti-idling bylaw, first proposed by Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie last spring. An anti-idling bylaw, said Linda Harvey, senior project manager of sustainability with the city, would significantly reduce air pollutants, decrease fuel costs, slash engine wear and tear, and improve the city's climate change goals.

Hamilton already established an anti-idling policy last year for city vehicles.

The proposed bylaw will: apply to vehicles on public and private property; apply to municipal, but not federal or provincial vehicles; not apply to boats, rail or aircrafts; restrict idling to three minutes in a 60-minute period; exempt police, transit, and emergency vehicles, and vehicles stuck in traffic and provide exemptions in heat and cold weather environments.

Fines would range from $100 to $380, depending upon the discretion of the judges who set the fines. Burlington, which has had anti-idling bylaw for over a year, has a fine of $155.

Harvey emphasized that the city must consider enforcement in order to put teeth into the legislation and urged councillors to adopt an education campaign to get residents used to the idea of shutting off their vehicles. Any education awareness campaign will involve Green Venture and other community partners.

Councillors Brian McHattie and Sam Merulla argued that transit vehicles should not be exempt from the bylaw. McHattie also asked city staff to review the City of Toronto's policy to eliminate boat idling. Politicians were to vote on the recommendations at their January 25 council meeting.

Education, enforcement needed to put teeth into anti-idling by-law

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You could soon be ticketed for idling your vehicle in along Hamilton streets - or even in your driveway.

Politicians approved an anti-idling policy last week that could take effect in June. But some councillors were reluctant to spend the money required to enforce the legislation and instead wanted to educate the community first through an awareness campaign.

Members of the Planning and Economic Development committee approved the new policy, but referred the estimated $130,000 cost to hire and train a new bylaw officer to enforce the legislation to the city's budget committee for debate.

Stoney Creek councillor Dave Mitchell rejected spending the $130,000 to enforce yet another bylaw.

"We can't support the ones we have now," he said. "I can't support adding another bylaw and drive the costs up. I'm in favour of an education program."

He agreed with Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina that if parking enforcement staff see vehicles idling, they should be authorized to issue notices identifying that they are in violation of the city's idling bylaw.

"I would rather do things that are voluntary," said Mitchell. "We don't need a bylaw for our overworked staff."

City staff have been reviewing the implications of establishing an anti-idling bylaw, first proposed by Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie last spring. An anti-idling bylaw, said Linda Harvey, senior project manager of sustainability with the city, would significantly reduce air pollutants, decrease fuel costs, slash engine wear and tear, and improve the city's climate change goals.

Hamilton already established an anti-idling policy last year for city vehicles.

The proposed bylaw will: apply to vehicles on public and private property; apply to municipal, but not federal or provincial vehicles; not apply to boats, rail or aircrafts; restrict idling to three minutes in a 60-minute period; exempt police, transit, and emergency vehicles, and vehicles stuck in traffic and provide exemptions in heat and cold weather environments.

Fines would range from $100 to $380, depending upon the discretion of the judges who set the fines. Burlington, which has had anti-idling bylaw for over a year, has a fine of $155.

Harvey emphasized that the city must consider enforcement in order to put teeth into the legislation and urged councillors to adopt an education campaign to get residents used to the idea of shutting off their vehicles. Any education awareness campaign will involve Green Venture and other community partners.

Councillors Brian McHattie and Sam Merulla argued that transit vehicles should not be exempt from the bylaw. McHattie also asked city staff to review the City of Toronto's policy to eliminate boat idling. Politicians were to vote on the recommendations at their January 25 council meeting.

Education, enforcement needed to put teeth into anti-idling by-law

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You could soon be ticketed for idling your vehicle in along Hamilton streets - or even in your driveway.

Politicians approved an anti-idling policy last week that could take effect in June. But some councillors were reluctant to spend the money required to enforce the legislation and instead wanted to educate the community first through an awareness campaign.

Members of the Planning and Economic Development committee approved the new policy, but referred the estimated $130,000 cost to hire and train a new bylaw officer to enforce the legislation to the city's budget committee for debate.

Stoney Creek councillor Dave Mitchell rejected spending the $130,000 to enforce yet another bylaw.

"We can't support the ones we have now," he said. "I can't support adding another bylaw and drive the costs up. I'm in favour of an education program."

He agreed with Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina that if parking enforcement staff see vehicles idling, they should be authorized to issue notices identifying that they are in violation of the city's idling bylaw.

"I would rather do things that are voluntary," said Mitchell. "We don't need a bylaw for our overworked staff."

City staff have been reviewing the implications of establishing an anti-idling bylaw, first proposed by Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie last spring. An anti-idling bylaw, said Linda Harvey, senior project manager of sustainability with the city, would significantly reduce air pollutants, decrease fuel costs, slash engine wear and tear, and improve the city's climate change goals.

Hamilton already established an anti-idling policy last year for city vehicles.

The proposed bylaw will: apply to vehicles on public and private property; apply to municipal, but not federal or provincial vehicles; not apply to boats, rail or aircrafts; restrict idling to three minutes in a 60-minute period; exempt police, transit, and emergency vehicles, and vehicles stuck in traffic and provide exemptions in heat and cold weather environments.

Fines would range from $100 to $380, depending upon the discretion of the judges who set the fines. Burlington, which has had anti-idling bylaw for over a year, has a fine of $155.

Harvey emphasized that the city must consider enforcement in order to put teeth into the legislation and urged councillors to adopt an education campaign to get residents used to the idea of shutting off their vehicles. Any education awareness campaign will involve Green Venture and other community partners.

Councillors Brian McHattie and Sam Merulla argued that transit vehicles should not be exempt from the bylaw. McHattie also asked city staff to review the City of Toronto's policy to eliminate boat idling. Politicians were to vote on the recommendations at their January 25 council meeting.