Local Green candidate pleased that local party ideals are taking root

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Green Party is taking root locally, and Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale candidate David Januczkowski is pleased that support slowly continues to grow.

The Freelton resident, who also ran under the Green banner in 2004, noted that the results in this riding were up by about 100 votes this time around, from 2,636 to 2,768 on Monday night.

"That's heartening," Januczkowski said Tuesday morning. "It seems we have a core group of supporters who embrace our ideology."

Januczkowski noted that "strategic voting" across the country played a large role in this election's outcome, and that the "first past the post" format puts the fledgling party at a disadvantage.

"Being new on the political scene, it's an uphill battle," he admitted, adding that while he heard a lot of good feedback on the party's platform, voters need to feel that a Green vote will have more of an impact on the political landscape.

Nationally, the Green Party ran a full slate of 308 candidates and earned 4.5 per cent of the vote. Its ability to field candidates in every province, says Januczkowski, ultimately will raise awareness of the party's platform and even tempt others to adopt some of their policies.

"We hope the other parties will look at all the good things people were saying about our platform and integrate some of our ideas into their own platforms," he said.

The Green Party stalwart was also heartened by the news that voter turnout in ADFW reached 77.6 per cent, soaring past the national turnout of 64.9 per cent, and higher than the 2004 local turnout of 69.5 per cent.

"The Green Party philosophy encourages community participation," he said. Now having thrown his own hat into the ring twice, Januczkowski would be happy to pass on the mantle the next time an election is called.

"I've run twice - and I'm proud to do so, and would consider doing so again," he said. "But it's important that no one individual becomes the face of the party. The Green Party has a broad base, and that has to be reflected. Personally, I would like to see another candidate run locally."

In that event, he added, he would continue to be involved with the party in another capacity.

"I've gleaned experience over the last two elections, and will use it either as a campaign manager - or even a candidate," said Januczkowski.

"Whatever it takes."

Local Green candidate pleased that local party ideals are taking root

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Green Party is taking root locally, and Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale candidate David Januczkowski is pleased that support slowly continues to grow.

The Freelton resident, who also ran under the Green banner in 2004, noted that the results in this riding were up by about 100 votes this time around, from 2,636 to 2,768 on Monday night.

"That's heartening," Januczkowski said Tuesday morning. "It seems we have a core group of supporters who embrace our ideology."

Januczkowski noted that "strategic voting" across the country played a large role in this election's outcome, and that the "first past the post" format puts the fledgling party at a disadvantage.

"Being new on the political scene, it's an uphill battle," he admitted, adding that while he heard a lot of good feedback on the party's platform, voters need to feel that a Green vote will have more of an impact on the political landscape.

Nationally, the Green Party ran a full slate of 308 candidates and earned 4.5 per cent of the vote. Its ability to field candidates in every province, says Januczkowski, ultimately will raise awareness of the party's platform and even tempt others to adopt some of their policies.

"We hope the other parties will look at all the good things people were saying about our platform and integrate some of our ideas into their own platforms," he said.

The Green Party stalwart was also heartened by the news that voter turnout in ADFW reached 77.6 per cent, soaring past the national turnout of 64.9 per cent, and higher than the 2004 local turnout of 69.5 per cent.

"The Green Party philosophy encourages community participation," he said. Now having thrown his own hat into the ring twice, Januczkowski would be happy to pass on the mantle the next time an election is called.

"I've run twice - and I'm proud to do so, and would consider doing so again," he said. "But it's important that no one individual becomes the face of the party. The Green Party has a broad base, and that has to be reflected. Personally, I would like to see another candidate run locally."

In that event, he added, he would continue to be involved with the party in another capacity.

"I've gleaned experience over the last two elections, and will use it either as a campaign manager - or even a candidate," said Januczkowski.

"Whatever it takes."

Local Green candidate pleased that local party ideals are taking root

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Green Party is taking root locally, and Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale candidate David Januczkowski is pleased that support slowly continues to grow.

The Freelton resident, who also ran under the Green banner in 2004, noted that the results in this riding were up by about 100 votes this time around, from 2,636 to 2,768 on Monday night.

"That's heartening," Januczkowski said Tuesday morning. "It seems we have a core group of supporters who embrace our ideology."

Januczkowski noted that "strategic voting" across the country played a large role in this election's outcome, and that the "first past the post" format puts the fledgling party at a disadvantage.

"Being new on the political scene, it's an uphill battle," he admitted, adding that while he heard a lot of good feedback on the party's platform, voters need to feel that a Green vote will have more of an impact on the political landscape.

Nationally, the Green Party ran a full slate of 308 candidates and earned 4.5 per cent of the vote. Its ability to field candidates in every province, says Januczkowski, ultimately will raise awareness of the party's platform and even tempt others to adopt some of their policies.

"We hope the other parties will look at all the good things people were saying about our platform and integrate some of our ideas into their own platforms," he said.

The Green Party stalwart was also heartened by the news that voter turnout in ADFW reached 77.6 per cent, soaring past the national turnout of 64.9 per cent, and higher than the 2004 local turnout of 69.5 per cent.

"The Green Party philosophy encourages community participation," he said. Now having thrown his own hat into the ring twice, Januczkowski would be happy to pass on the mantle the next time an election is called.

"I've run twice - and I'm proud to do so, and would consider doing so again," he said. "But it's important that no one individual becomes the face of the party. The Green Party has a broad base, and that has to be reflected. Personally, I would like to see another candidate run locally."

In that event, he added, he would continue to be involved with the party in another capacity.

"I've gleaned experience over the last two elections, and will use it either as a campaign manager - or even a candidate," said Januczkowski.

"Whatever it takes."