Waterdown mom gets back to basics at pond hockey tourney

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A local mom of three has hit the big-time.

Waterdown's Marilyn Lobert will be taking the hockey world by storm, when she attends the first annual National Pond Hockey Championships this weekend in Deerhurst.

"I've never played pond hockey before," she said with a laugh.

She won't be the only one.

The National Pond Hockey Championships is the brainchild of hockey fans like Neil Lumsden. The concept was born during last year's NHL lockout, when Canadians were hungering for a hockey fix.

Pond hockey is a pure form of hockey, played on natural ice, with minimal equipment, few rules and no on-ice referees. It resurrects the purest form of the sport, said Lumsden. And it's all about having good fun in fresh air.

Lobert joined when Sonya Hoekstra, a friend from Hamilton coaxed her to join. Although she hadn't played hockey since college, it sounded fun.

"She really got me excited about it," said Lobert. "It's a great opportunity. I love the outdoors and I love to skate."

So Sonya recruited her friend Wendy Derugin of Georgetown, who brought along a few friends of her own, and the Pond Penguins were formed.

They've only met as a team once. But they aren't letting their lack of experience dampen their enthusiasm.

"The first game might be a bit of a challenge," admits Lobert. "But it's going to be fun."

The Pond Penguins are one of 24 women's teams competing for the coveted trophy, which is hand-carved from Canadian maple, and displayed at the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Teams have joined from all over North America. Some players are even trekking up from Texas to participate, noted organizers. There are more than 100 men's teams participating as well.

Lobert has been adhering to a training schedule to get herself prepared for the Championships. The full-time mom of three can be spotted skating at local arenas, and she brushes up on her hockey skills with an occasional one-on-one match with her 4-year-old son.

"I'm really excited," she said. "It's going to be lots of fun."

Waterdown mom gets back to basics at pond hockey tourney

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A local mom of three has hit the big-time.

Waterdown's Marilyn Lobert will be taking the hockey world by storm, when she attends the first annual National Pond Hockey Championships this weekend in Deerhurst.

"I've never played pond hockey before," she said with a laugh.

She won't be the only one.

The National Pond Hockey Championships is the brainchild of hockey fans like Neil Lumsden. The concept was born during last year's NHL lockout, when Canadians were hungering for a hockey fix.

Pond hockey is a pure form of hockey, played on natural ice, with minimal equipment, few rules and no on-ice referees. It resurrects the purest form of the sport, said Lumsden. And it's all about having good fun in fresh air.

Lobert joined when Sonya Hoekstra, a friend from Hamilton coaxed her to join. Although she hadn't played hockey since college, it sounded fun.

"She really got me excited about it," said Lobert. "It's a great opportunity. I love the outdoors and I love to skate."

So Sonya recruited her friend Wendy Derugin of Georgetown, who brought along a few friends of her own, and the Pond Penguins were formed.

They've only met as a team once. But they aren't letting their lack of experience dampen their enthusiasm.

"The first game might be a bit of a challenge," admits Lobert. "But it's going to be fun."

The Pond Penguins are one of 24 women's teams competing for the coveted trophy, which is hand-carved from Canadian maple, and displayed at the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Teams have joined from all over North America. Some players are even trekking up from Texas to participate, noted organizers. There are more than 100 men's teams participating as well.

Lobert has been adhering to a training schedule to get herself prepared for the Championships. The full-time mom of three can be spotted skating at local arenas, and she brushes up on her hockey skills with an occasional one-on-one match with her 4-year-old son.

"I'm really excited," she said. "It's going to be lots of fun."

Waterdown mom gets back to basics at pond hockey tourney

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A local mom of three has hit the big-time.

Waterdown's Marilyn Lobert will be taking the hockey world by storm, when she attends the first annual National Pond Hockey Championships this weekend in Deerhurst.

"I've never played pond hockey before," she said with a laugh.

She won't be the only one.

The National Pond Hockey Championships is the brainchild of hockey fans like Neil Lumsden. The concept was born during last year's NHL lockout, when Canadians were hungering for a hockey fix.

Pond hockey is a pure form of hockey, played on natural ice, with minimal equipment, few rules and no on-ice referees. It resurrects the purest form of the sport, said Lumsden. And it's all about having good fun in fresh air.

Lobert joined when Sonya Hoekstra, a friend from Hamilton coaxed her to join. Although she hadn't played hockey since college, it sounded fun.

"She really got me excited about it," said Lobert. "It's a great opportunity. I love the outdoors and I love to skate."

So Sonya recruited her friend Wendy Derugin of Georgetown, who brought along a few friends of her own, and the Pond Penguins were formed.

They've only met as a team once. But they aren't letting their lack of experience dampen their enthusiasm.

"The first game might be a bit of a challenge," admits Lobert. "But it's going to be fun."

The Pond Penguins are one of 24 women's teams competing for the coveted trophy, which is hand-carved from Canadian maple, and displayed at the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Teams have joined from all over North America. Some players are even trekking up from Texas to participate, noted organizers. There are more than 100 men's teams participating as well.

Lobert has been adhering to a training schedule to get herself prepared for the Championships. The full-time mom of three can be spotted skating at local arenas, and she brushes up on her hockey skills with an occasional one-on-one match with her 4-year-old son.

"I'm really excited," she said. "It's going to be lots of fun."