Take a ride on the Underground Railroad with visiting author

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Waterdown-East Flamborough Heritage Society invites local residents to come for a ride along the underground railroad at its next meeting, on Friday, January 27.

The group will host Dr. David Beasley, who will speak about his book, Sarah's Journey as well as background on other forgotten Canadians such as Major John Richardson and Richard Beasley, one of Hamilton's early settlers and an ancestor of the author.

February is Black History Month. Beasley's novel, Sarah's Journey, centres on the life of a slave who escaped from Virginia to Upper Canada and chronicles both an escape to freedom, as well as an adventurous passage through life. The work won the Hamilton Literary Award for best novel of 2004.

The book's protagonist, Sarah Lewis, is a slave who escapes from Virginia in 1820 and comes to Simcoe. The story deals with the development of the ares, the black and white communities and Sarah's - and her family's - development through to her death in 1863. Historical events such as the rebellion in the Simcoe area, are included.

Beasley will also discuss his biography of Major John Richards, Canada's first novelist. Richardson produced brilliant works, including the often re-issued "Wacousta," but he had to leave Canada for the United States to find publishers.

Beasley was born in Hamilton, Ontario, and is descended from its first settler. He has written novels, biographies and other non-fiction books, on topics from the definitive biography of Canada's first novelist to a political-economic study of the automobile. He has returned from living abroad for many years to live closer to his roots.

Beasley has a PhD in economics and is presently researching for a novel about Canada during the American Revolution.

The Historical Society meeting takes place Friday, January 27 in Fellowship Hall at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive in Waterdown. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 8 p.m.

Admission is free, everyone is welcome.

Take a ride on the Underground Railroad with visiting author

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Waterdown-East Flamborough Heritage Society invites local residents to come for a ride along the underground railroad at its next meeting, on Friday, January 27.

The group will host Dr. David Beasley, who will speak about his book, Sarah's Journey as well as background on other forgotten Canadians such as Major John Richardson and Richard Beasley, one of Hamilton's early settlers and an ancestor of the author.

February is Black History Month. Beasley's novel, Sarah's Journey, centres on the life of a slave who escaped from Virginia to Upper Canada and chronicles both an escape to freedom, as well as an adventurous passage through life. The work won the Hamilton Literary Award for best novel of 2004.

The book's protagonist, Sarah Lewis, is a slave who escapes from Virginia in 1820 and comes to Simcoe. The story deals with the development of the ares, the black and white communities and Sarah's - and her family's - development through to her death in 1863. Historical events such as the rebellion in the Simcoe area, are included.

Beasley will also discuss his biography of Major John Richards, Canada's first novelist. Richardson produced brilliant works, including the often re-issued "Wacousta," but he had to leave Canada for the United States to find publishers.

Beasley was born in Hamilton, Ontario, and is descended from its first settler. He has written novels, biographies and other non-fiction books, on topics from the definitive biography of Canada's first novelist to a political-economic study of the automobile. He has returned from living abroad for many years to live closer to his roots.

Beasley has a PhD in economics and is presently researching for a novel about Canada during the American Revolution.

The Historical Society meeting takes place Friday, January 27 in Fellowship Hall at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive in Waterdown. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 8 p.m.

Admission is free, everyone is welcome.

Take a ride on the Underground Railroad with visiting author

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Waterdown-East Flamborough Heritage Society invites local residents to come for a ride along the underground railroad at its next meeting, on Friday, January 27.

The group will host Dr. David Beasley, who will speak about his book, Sarah's Journey as well as background on other forgotten Canadians such as Major John Richardson and Richard Beasley, one of Hamilton's early settlers and an ancestor of the author.

February is Black History Month. Beasley's novel, Sarah's Journey, centres on the life of a slave who escaped from Virginia to Upper Canada and chronicles both an escape to freedom, as well as an adventurous passage through life. The work won the Hamilton Literary Award for best novel of 2004.

The book's protagonist, Sarah Lewis, is a slave who escapes from Virginia in 1820 and comes to Simcoe. The story deals with the development of the ares, the black and white communities and Sarah's - and her family's - development through to her death in 1863. Historical events such as the rebellion in the Simcoe area, are included.

Beasley will also discuss his biography of Major John Richards, Canada's first novelist. Richardson produced brilliant works, including the often re-issued "Wacousta," but he had to leave Canada for the United States to find publishers.

Beasley was born in Hamilton, Ontario, and is descended from its first settler. He has written novels, biographies and other non-fiction books, on topics from the definitive biography of Canada's first novelist to a political-economic study of the automobile. He has returned from living abroad for many years to live closer to his roots.

Beasley has a PhD in economics and is presently researching for a novel about Canada during the American Revolution.

The Historical Society meeting takes place Friday, January 27 in Fellowship Hall at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive in Waterdown. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 8 p.m.

Admission is free, everyone is welcome.