NDP consolidates support, continues to gain ground in ADFW riding

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the third consecutive time, Dundas physician and medical researcher, Gord Guyatt, carried the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner into the federal election and lost. But also for the third consecutive time, he increased his margin of support, this time winning almost 2,000 more votes, or 21.3 per cent of the 62,693 votes cast in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ADFW) riding.

Guyatt got 13,359 votes Monday night compared to 11,557 in the June, 2004 election when 55,263 voters went to the ADFW polls. He took 20.9 per cent of the votes in the last election, more than tripling the 3,627 votes that he won in the federal election in 2000.

"From our point of view, we consolidated our support from the prior election," Guyatt said Wednesday. He considers the maintenance of support to be significant because of the major strides made by the NDP in the ADFW riding in the 2004 election compared to their showing in 2000.

As was the case in 2004, the bulk of Guyatt's votes this election came from Westdale and Dundas residents, but he also managed to hold about 15 per cent support in the two remaining parts of the riding, Flamborough and Ancaster. He was encouraged by the win of his first poll ever in Ancaster Monday night.

"We're clearly a force in the riding," he said.

Campaign workers interviewed at the Air Force Association hall in Dundas before poll results started arriving Monday night were hopeful that the student vote at McMaster University would help swing the vote in Guyatt's favour. But CPC candidate David Sweet and the Tory tide proved unstoppable, although the Conservatives did not win the student vote.

"Among students, I did much better than Sweet and was close to (Liberal incumbent Russ) Powers" in many of the polls, Guyatt observed. There were two polling stations in the Mary Keyes building on McMaster's campus and both were very busy election night.

The student vote lent an interesting dynamic to the election. Turnout at the campus polls was so heavy that voting times had to be extended beyond the 9:30 p.m. cut-off.

Guyatt's manager, John Roy, described the student polls as "extremely busy" on election night, a fact confirmed by Richard Allen of Greensville. Allen, a former MPP for Hamilton West (1982-1995) and a member of cabinet in Bob Rae's government, said students were lined up in the building's hallway "two and three deep" while waiting to cast their ballot. There were "huge waiting lines of students," he reported, prompting a deputy returning officer to rule that the cut-off time be extended to allow all waiting students an opportunity to vote.

Roy said campaign workers were "extremely optimistic" that Guyatt would do well, "especially with a large student vote and terrific turnout." He added that the NDP message appeared to be welcomed by many students, and that McMaster's student newspaper, The Silhouette, came out editorially in support of the NDP.

In the 2004 election, many students voted outside the ADFW riding in the communities where they live as the voting occurred in June when most students had returned home after finishing their school term.

Results received Monday from voting stations at or near the university showed that student support was generally divided between the NDP and Liberals. Guyatt took one of the Mary Keyes' polls with 126 votes to Powers' 119. Powers won the other with 252 to Guyatt's 180.

In one of the nearby apartment buildings where many students live, the count was Powers, 66, Guyatt, 45 and Sweet, 28, while at another it was Powers, 112, Guyatt, 72 and Sweet, 53. Powers won the poll at Dalewood School by a one-vote margin, winning 106 votes to Guyatt's 105, but in a nearby poll, Guyatt picked up 82 votes to Powers's 81.

Helping to soothe the sting of Guyatt's loss were major NDP victories in Hamilton where Chris Charlton took the Hamilton Mountain riding and Wayne Marston won Hamilton East-Stoney Creek. NDP incumbent David Christopherson retained his seat in Hamilton Centre.

Party supporters were also buoyed by NDP gains nationally. The NDP emerged with 29 seats, 11 more than they had when Parliament was dissolved for this election.

"There's no doubt in my mind that the NDP reflects Canadian values," Guyatt said, maintaining that the party would do significantly better, both locally and nationally, if proportional representation were adopted.

Proportional representation refers to a variety of systems used for electing a legislature in which the number of seats that a party wins is more or less proportional to the percentage of popular votes received.

NDP consolidates support, continues to gain ground in ADFW riding

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the third consecutive time, Dundas physician and medical researcher, Gord Guyatt, carried the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner into the federal election and lost. But also for the third consecutive time, he increased his margin of support, this time winning almost 2,000 more votes, or 21.3 per cent of the 62,693 votes cast in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ADFW) riding.

Guyatt got 13,359 votes Monday night compared to 11,557 in the June, 2004 election when 55,263 voters went to the ADFW polls. He took 20.9 per cent of the votes in the last election, more than tripling the 3,627 votes that he won in the federal election in 2000.

"From our point of view, we consolidated our support from the prior election," Guyatt said Wednesday. He considers the maintenance of support to be significant because of the major strides made by the NDP in the ADFW riding in the 2004 election compared to their showing in 2000.

As was the case in 2004, the bulk of Guyatt's votes this election came from Westdale and Dundas residents, but he also managed to hold about 15 per cent support in the two remaining parts of the riding, Flamborough and Ancaster. He was encouraged by the win of his first poll ever in Ancaster Monday night.

"We're clearly a force in the riding," he said.

Campaign workers interviewed at the Air Force Association hall in Dundas before poll results started arriving Monday night were hopeful that the student vote at McMaster University would help swing the vote in Guyatt's favour. But CPC candidate David Sweet and the Tory tide proved unstoppable, although the Conservatives did not win the student vote.

"Among students, I did much better than Sweet and was close to (Liberal incumbent Russ) Powers" in many of the polls, Guyatt observed. There were two polling stations in the Mary Keyes building on McMaster's campus and both were very busy election night.

The student vote lent an interesting dynamic to the election. Turnout at the campus polls was so heavy that voting times had to be extended beyond the 9:30 p.m. cut-off.

Guyatt's manager, John Roy, described the student polls as "extremely busy" on election night, a fact confirmed by Richard Allen of Greensville. Allen, a former MPP for Hamilton West (1982-1995) and a member of cabinet in Bob Rae's government, said students were lined up in the building's hallway "two and three deep" while waiting to cast their ballot. There were "huge waiting lines of students," he reported, prompting a deputy returning officer to rule that the cut-off time be extended to allow all waiting students an opportunity to vote.

Roy said campaign workers were "extremely optimistic" that Guyatt would do well, "especially with a large student vote and terrific turnout." He added that the NDP message appeared to be welcomed by many students, and that McMaster's student newspaper, The Silhouette, came out editorially in support of the NDP.

In the 2004 election, many students voted outside the ADFW riding in the communities where they live as the voting occurred in June when most students had returned home after finishing their school term.

Results received Monday from voting stations at or near the university showed that student support was generally divided between the NDP and Liberals. Guyatt took one of the Mary Keyes' polls with 126 votes to Powers' 119. Powers won the other with 252 to Guyatt's 180.

In one of the nearby apartment buildings where many students live, the count was Powers, 66, Guyatt, 45 and Sweet, 28, while at another it was Powers, 112, Guyatt, 72 and Sweet, 53. Powers won the poll at Dalewood School by a one-vote margin, winning 106 votes to Guyatt's 105, but in a nearby poll, Guyatt picked up 82 votes to Powers's 81.

Helping to soothe the sting of Guyatt's loss were major NDP victories in Hamilton where Chris Charlton took the Hamilton Mountain riding and Wayne Marston won Hamilton East-Stoney Creek. NDP incumbent David Christopherson retained his seat in Hamilton Centre.

Party supporters were also buoyed by NDP gains nationally. The NDP emerged with 29 seats, 11 more than they had when Parliament was dissolved for this election.

"There's no doubt in my mind that the NDP reflects Canadian values," Guyatt said, maintaining that the party would do significantly better, both locally and nationally, if proportional representation were adopted.

Proportional representation refers to a variety of systems used for electing a legislature in which the number of seats that a party wins is more or less proportional to the percentage of popular votes received.

NDP consolidates support, continues to gain ground in ADFW riding

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the third consecutive time, Dundas physician and medical researcher, Gord Guyatt, carried the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner into the federal election and lost. But also for the third consecutive time, he increased his margin of support, this time winning almost 2,000 more votes, or 21.3 per cent of the 62,693 votes cast in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ADFW) riding.

Guyatt got 13,359 votes Monday night compared to 11,557 in the June, 2004 election when 55,263 voters went to the ADFW polls. He took 20.9 per cent of the votes in the last election, more than tripling the 3,627 votes that he won in the federal election in 2000.

"From our point of view, we consolidated our support from the prior election," Guyatt said Wednesday. He considers the maintenance of support to be significant because of the major strides made by the NDP in the ADFW riding in the 2004 election compared to their showing in 2000.

As was the case in 2004, the bulk of Guyatt's votes this election came from Westdale and Dundas residents, but he also managed to hold about 15 per cent support in the two remaining parts of the riding, Flamborough and Ancaster. He was encouraged by the win of his first poll ever in Ancaster Monday night.

"We're clearly a force in the riding," he said.

Campaign workers interviewed at the Air Force Association hall in Dundas before poll results started arriving Monday night were hopeful that the student vote at McMaster University would help swing the vote in Guyatt's favour. But CPC candidate David Sweet and the Tory tide proved unstoppable, although the Conservatives did not win the student vote.

"Among students, I did much better than Sweet and was close to (Liberal incumbent Russ) Powers" in many of the polls, Guyatt observed. There were two polling stations in the Mary Keyes building on McMaster's campus and both were very busy election night.

The student vote lent an interesting dynamic to the election. Turnout at the campus polls was so heavy that voting times had to be extended beyond the 9:30 p.m. cut-off.

Guyatt's manager, John Roy, described the student polls as "extremely busy" on election night, a fact confirmed by Richard Allen of Greensville. Allen, a former MPP for Hamilton West (1982-1995) and a member of cabinet in Bob Rae's government, said students were lined up in the building's hallway "two and three deep" while waiting to cast their ballot. There were "huge waiting lines of students," he reported, prompting a deputy returning officer to rule that the cut-off time be extended to allow all waiting students an opportunity to vote.

Roy said campaign workers were "extremely optimistic" that Guyatt would do well, "especially with a large student vote and terrific turnout." He added that the NDP message appeared to be welcomed by many students, and that McMaster's student newspaper, The Silhouette, came out editorially in support of the NDP.

In the 2004 election, many students voted outside the ADFW riding in the communities where they live as the voting occurred in June when most students had returned home after finishing their school term.

Results received Monday from voting stations at or near the university showed that student support was generally divided between the NDP and Liberals. Guyatt took one of the Mary Keyes' polls with 126 votes to Powers' 119. Powers won the other with 252 to Guyatt's 180.

In one of the nearby apartment buildings where many students live, the count was Powers, 66, Guyatt, 45 and Sweet, 28, while at another it was Powers, 112, Guyatt, 72 and Sweet, 53. Powers won the poll at Dalewood School by a one-vote margin, winning 106 votes to Guyatt's 105, but in a nearby poll, Guyatt picked up 82 votes to Powers's 81.

Helping to soothe the sting of Guyatt's loss were major NDP victories in Hamilton where Chris Charlton took the Hamilton Mountain riding and Wayne Marston won Hamilton East-Stoney Creek. NDP incumbent David Christopherson retained his seat in Hamilton Centre.

Party supporters were also buoyed by NDP gains nationally. The NDP emerged with 29 seats, 11 more than they had when Parliament was dissolved for this election.

"There's no doubt in my mind that the NDP reflects Canadian values," Guyatt said, maintaining that the party would do significantly better, both locally and nationally, if proportional representation were adopted.

Proportional representation refers to a variety of systems used for electing a legislature in which the number of seats that a party wins is more or less proportional to the percentage of popular votes received.