Investigators continue to probe cause of fatal Kerns Road crash

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Police have tentatively identified the victim of a recent single-car crash just off of Kerns Road as a cab driver from Hamilton.

But confirming the man's identity may take some time, say Halton police, as DNA samples will be required from family members. There were no dental records available for the victim to be used to provide positive identification, said Det.-Const. Paul Davies of the Halton Regional Traffic Bureau, the division investigating the death.

Davies said although police, fire and ambulance crews arrived at the crash scene within 10 minutes in the early morning hours on Sunday, January 8, fire had engulfed the taxi and its occupant was dead.

Police say there was no one else in the vehicle.

A nearby homeowner heard the crash, saw the fire and called 911.

The incident occurred just after 2:30 a.m. Davies said investigators believe a 37-year-old man was operating a cab for Ancaster Taxi at the time. The driver had dropped off fares at a Burlington location and was headed to Waterdown when he was told by a dispatcher to pick up some people at a Burlington bar.

On his way back, police think he lost control of the cab while travelling southbound on Kerns Road, just south of Dundas Street, near the Flamborough border.

"There were a significant amount of skid marks leading up to the area where the vehicle left the roadway," said Davies. "At the apex of the curve it actually rises up so it's almost like a launching ramp, so (the car) would have gone through the air and then hit the tree part way up, spun counter-clockwise and came down. At (some) point the vehicle burst into flames."

An autopsy determined the cause of death to be smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.

"There were no injuries from blunt force trauma, which is quite surprising, considering the extent of the damage to the car. The pathologist said (the driver) would have been overcome (by CO vapours and smoke toxins) in a matter of seconds," said Davies.

The detective-constable noted that the victim was unmarried but has a large family, including relatives in Hamilton, Milton, Oakville and overseas.

As for the cause of the crash, he said investigators can only speculate at this point.

"It looks like speed is a factor. The road was wet but not icy or slushy and it's a well-lit area. A prudent driver within the speed limit would not have any problem at all negotiating that curve."

Road design and maintenance and warning signage are not issues in the investigation, said Davies.

"He might have possibly gone through a guardrail if one was there," he said.

"I don't think that would have stopped a car coming at it head-on."

Investigators continue to probe cause of fatal Kerns Road crash

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Police have tentatively identified the victim of a recent single-car crash just off of Kerns Road as a cab driver from Hamilton.

But confirming the man's identity may take some time, say Halton police, as DNA samples will be required from family members. There were no dental records available for the victim to be used to provide positive identification, said Det.-Const. Paul Davies of the Halton Regional Traffic Bureau, the division investigating the death.

Davies said although police, fire and ambulance crews arrived at the crash scene within 10 minutes in the early morning hours on Sunday, January 8, fire had engulfed the taxi and its occupant was dead.

Police say there was no one else in the vehicle.

A nearby homeowner heard the crash, saw the fire and called 911.

The incident occurred just after 2:30 a.m. Davies said investigators believe a 37-year-old man was operating a cab for Ancaster Taxi at the time. The driver had dropped off fares at a Burlington location and was headed to Waterdown when he was told by a dispatcher to pick up some people at a Burlington bar.

On his way back, police think he lost control of the cab while travelling southbound on Kerns Road, just south of Dundas Street, near the Flamborough border.

"There were a significant amount of skid marks leading up to the area where the vehicle left the roadway," said Davies. "At the apex of the curve it actually rises up so it's almost like a launching ramp, so (the car) would have gone through the air and then hit the tree part way up, spun counter-clockwise and came down. At (some) point the vehicle burst into flames."

An autopsy determined the cause of death to be smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.

"There were no injuries from blunt force trauma, which is quite surprising, considering the extent of the damage to the car. The pathologist said (the driver) would have been overcome (by CO vapours and smoke toxins) in a matter of seconds," said Davies.

The detective-constable noted that the victim was unmarried but has a large family, including relatives in Hamilton, Milton, Oakville and overseas.

As for the cause of the crash, he said investigators can only speculate at this point.

"It looks like speed is a factor. The road was wet but not icy or slushy and it's a well-lit area. A prudent driver within the speed limit would not have any problem at all negotiating that curve."

Road design and maintenance and warning signage are not issues in the investigation, said Davies.

"He might have possibly gone through a guardrail if one was there," he said.

"I don't think that would have stopped a car coming at it head-on."

Investigators continue to probe cause of fatal Kerns Road crash

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Police have tentatively identified the victim of a recent single-car crash just off of Kerns Road as a cab driver from Hamilton.

But confirming the man's identity may take some time, say Halton police, as DNA samples will be required from family members. There were no dental records available for the victim to be used to provide positive identification, said Det.-Const. Paul Davies of the Halton Regional Traffic Bureau, the division investigating the death.

Davies said although police, fire and ambulance crews arrived at the crash scene within 10 minutes in the early morning hours on Sunday, January 8, fire had engulfed the taxi and its occupant was dead.

Police say there was no one else in the vehicle.

A nearby homeowner heard the crash, saw the fire and called 911.

The incident occurred just after 2:30 a.m. Davies said investigators believe a 37-year-old man was operating a cab for Ancaster Taxi at the time. The driver had dropped off fares at a Burlington location and was headed to Waterdown when he was told by a dispatcher to pick up some people at a Burlington bar.

On his way back, police think he lost control of the cab while travelling southbound on Kerns Road, just south of Dundas Street, near the Flamborough border.

"There were a significant amount of skid marks leading up to the area where the vehicle left the roadway," said Davies. "At the apex of the curve it actually rises up so it's almost like a launching ramp, so (the car) would have gone through the air and then hit the tree part way up, spun counter-clockwise and came down. At (some) point the vehicle burst into flames."

An autopsy determined the cause of death to be smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.

"There were no injuries from blunt force trauma, which is quite surprising, considering the extent of the damage to the car. The pathologist said (the driver) would have been overcome (by CO vapours and smoke toxins) in a matter of seconds," said Davies.

The detective-constable noted that the victim was unmarried but has a large family, including relatives in Hamilton, Milton, Oakville and overseas.

As for the cause of the crash, he said investigators can only speculate at this point.

"It looks like speed is a factor. The road was wet but not icy or slushy and it's a well-lit area. A prudent driver within the speed limit would not have any problem at all negotiating that curve."

Road design and maintenance and warning signage are not issues in the investigation, said Davies.

"He might have possibly gone through a guardrail if one was there," he said.

"I don't think that would have stopped a car coming at it head-on."