R-E-S-P-E-C-T

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If there is a lesson to be learned - by all politicians - from Monday's federal election results it is this:

Do not take the electorate for granted.

In a rebuke to Paul Martin's leadership (or lack of) and 13 years of Liberal rule, Canadian voters elected a minority government - Stephen Harper's Conservatives - just as many pre-election polls had suggested they would. The fact Harper was able to bring Conservatives to power barely two years after riding shotgun on a merger between Reformers and Conservatives, and only 18 months after an election defeat, is testament to his ability to sell Canadians what the Conservatives have to offer.

Of course, he had plenty of help - mostly in the form of Martin and the Liberals. While Harper can be credited with doing the seemingly impossible, the same can be said for Martin. His party was in firm control of this election when it began, yet he failed to convince Canadians the Liberals were still best for the country despite a booming economy and low inflation and unemployment rates.

Instead, the unfocused Grits adopted a "who cares" attitude when it came to the crucial issue of the sponsorship scandal (and other scandals), and failed to act on a number of promises during the past 18 months. They adopted an arrogance - as if it was their right to govern -and angered voters in the process.

Martin and company blithely ignored obvious signs the electorate was out for blood - governing blood.

The Liberals got off to a slow start in the campaign, stumbled repeatedly, then in the final two weeks tried to demonize the Tories (and especially Harper) - a strategy they used successfully last time.

This time, however, not enough voters were buying the Liberals' message, and because they weren't, paid more attention to the Conservatives' vision for this country. While that vision is not one embraced by the majority of "progressive" voters, it is one that many on the left side of the political spectrum are at least now willing to try out.

While enough voters gave Harper the keys to the car Monday, they did so gingerly, handing him only the slightest minority win. How Harper and his party proceed will be interesting to watch. He promised a more

centrist Conservative government and we hope he delivers despite the obvious pressure he will face from his Western power base.

The national trend was very evident locally with Liberal incumbents across Hamilton losing their seats to Conservative and NDP candidates, leaving the city without a single Grit representing its interests in Ottawa for the first time in recent history.

The fact that voter turnout in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding reached 77.6 per cent - one of the healthiest riding results in the country - means that constituents this time around not only want to effect change, but expect the 39th Canadian Parliament to deliver it.

We thank all candidates for running, and thank everyone who voted for letting their voices be heard in Ottawa.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If there is a lesson to be learned - by all politicians - from Monday's federal election results it is this:

Do not take the electorate for granted.

In a rebuke to Paul Martin's leadership (or lack of) and 13 years of Liberal rule, Canadian voters elected a minority government - Stephen Harper's Conservatives - just as many pre-election polls had suggested they would. The fact Harper was able to bring Conservatives to power barely two years after riding shotgun on a merger between Reformers and Conservatives, and only 18 months after an election defeat, is testament to his ability to sell Canadians what the Conservatives have to offer.

Of course, he had plenty of help - mostly in the form of Martin and the Liberals. While Harper can be credited with doing the seemingly impossible, the same can be said for Martin. His party was in firm control of this election when it began, yet he failed to convince Canadians the Liberals were still best for the country despite a booming economy and low inflation and unemployment rates.

Instead, the unfocused Grits adopted a "who cares" attitude when it came to the crucial issue of the sponsorship scandal (and other scandals), and failed to act on a number of promises during the past 18 months. They adopted an arrogance - as if it was their right to govern -and angered voters in the process.

Martin and company blithely ignored obvious signs the electorate was out for blood - governing blood.

The Liberals got off to a slow start in the campaign, stumbled repeatedly, then in the final two weeks tried to demonize the Tories (and especially Harper) - a strategy they used successfully last time.

This time, however, not enough voters were buying the Liberals' message, and because they weren't, paid more attention to the Conservatives' vision for this country. While that vision is not one embraced by the majority of "progressive" voters, it is one that many on the left side of the political spectrum are at least now willing to try out.

While enough voters gave Harper the keys to the car Monday, they did so gingerly, handing him only the slightest minority win. How Harper and his party proceed will be interesting to watch. He promised a more

centrist Conservative government and we hope he delivers despite the obvious pressure he will face from his Western power base.

The national trend was very evident locally with Liberal incumbents across Hamilton losing their seats to Conservative and NDP candidates, leaving the city without a single Grit representing its interests in Ottawa for the first time in recent history.

The fact that voter turnout in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding reached 77.6 per cent - one of the healthiest riding results in the country - means that constituents this time around not only want to effect change, but expect the 39th Canadian Parliament to deliver it.

We thank all candidates for running, and thank everyone who voted for letting their voices be heard in Ottawa.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If there is a lesson to be learned - by all politicians - from Monday's federal election results it is this:

Do not take the electorate for granted.

In a rebuke to Paul Martin's leadership (or lack of) and 13 years of Liberal rule, Canadian voters elected a minority government - Stephen Harper's Conservatives - just as many pre-election polls had suggested they would. The fact Harper was able to bring Conservatives to power barely two years after riding shotgun on a merger between Reformers and Conservatives, and only 18 months after an election defeat, is testament to his ability to sell Canadians what the Conservatives have to offer.

Of course, he had plenty of help - mostly in the form of Martin and the Liberals. While Harper can be credited with doing the seemingly impossible, the same can be said for Martin. His party was in firm control of this election when it began, yet he failed to convince Canadians the Liberals were still best for the country despite a booming economy and low inflation and unemployment rates.

Instead, the unfocused Grits adopted a "who cares" attitude when it came to the crucial issue of the sponsorship scandal (and other scandals), and failed to act on a number of promises during the past 18 months. They adopted an arrogance - as if it was their right to govern -and angered voters in the process.

Martin and company blithely ignored obvious signs the electorate was out for blood - governing blood.

The Liberals got off to a slow start in the campaign, stumbled repeatedly, then in the final two weeks tried to demonize the Tories (and especially Harper) - a strategy they used successfully last time.

This time, however, not enough voters were buying the Liberals' message, and because they weren't, paid more attention to the Conservatives' vision for this country. While that vision is not one embraced by the majority of "progressive" voters, it is one that many on the left side of the political spectrum are at least now willing to try out.

While enough voters gave Harper the keys to the car Monday, they did so gingerly, handing him only the slightest minority win. How Harper and his party proceed will be interesting to watch. He promised a more

centrist Conservative government and we hope he delivers despite the obvious pressure he will face from his Western power base.

The national trend was very evident locally with Liberal incumbents across Hamilton losing their seats to Conservative and NDP candidates, leaving the city without a single Grit representing its interests in Ottawa for the first time in recent history.

The fact that voter turnout in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding reached 77.6 per cent - one of the healthiest riding results in the country - means that constituents this time around not only want to effect change, but expect the 39th Canadian Parliament to deliver it.

We thank all candidates for running, and thank everyone who voted for letting their voices be heard in Ottawa.