City council debates street sweepers and Liberty Energy

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CLEAN STREETS AND AIR

Not only will Hamilton's streets be cleaner, but the air will improve too.

Members of the Public Works, Infrastructure and Environment committee have approved spending just over $2 million for eight street sweepers. Chris Hill, the manager of central fleet, said the proposal is a great deal because the company, The Equipment Specialist Inc., is offering a savings to Hamilton and Toronto, which have been involved in a 16-month joint tendering proposal process. For the price of six street sweepers, Hamilton will receive eight street sweepers.

Hamilton has 17 street sweepers, including three that are supplied by private contractors, said Hill. Six machines are due for replacement.

The company can deliver one of the street sweepers immediately, with the rest of the sweepers, which are Tymco DST-6 models, available to the city by May.

The Tymco machine passed all the road, fuel and emissions tests during a demonstration phase in Toronto, said Hill.

Numerous tests and the Medical Officer of Health have pointed out that area residents are suffering poor health effects from the high particulate matter along Hamilton's streets and walkways.

The city's roadways are a primary contributor to the pollution.

"Next to snow clearing complaints, street sweeping were next," said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson. "There have been breakdowns. The service has become very frustrating for residents."

This is the first time city staff have purchased street sweepers since problems erupted when former employees bought two street sweepers for about $1 million over three years ago. The resulting publicity, revealed by Hamilton councillor Chad Collins, instigated an internal review. It found flaws in the city's purchasing and tender policies.

Politicians were slated to vote on the recommendation at their January 25 council meeting.

TOUGHER PROCESS FOR LIBERTY ENERGY

Hamilton politicians have asked the provincial Environment Ministry to conduct a full environmental assessment on the incinerator application made by Liberty Energy last June for a Strathearne Avenue location.

Liberty Energy applied for a zoning permit to construct an electrical generating facility. The city hired Dillon Consulting to conduct a peer review of Liberty Energy's environmental noise study. The document stated that Liberty Energy had "generally met" the requirements of an electricity project environmental assessment. But the consultants did have some concerns about technical issues and the EA process.

Representatives of Hamilton's waste reduction task force last week urged councillors to ask the province to conduct a more comprehensive environmental assessment on the project.

Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla, who opposes the application, said Liberty Energy is proposing an incinerator in a part of the city that is "overly-intensified."

Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina, who supports Liberty Energy's project, said he found Liberty Energy officials "forthright and forthcoming."

Councillors' recommendation was sent to the MoE on January 17 in order to meet the deadline for public comment on the application set by the province.

City council debates street sweepers and Liberty Energy

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CLEAN STREETS AND AIR

Not only will Hamilton's streets be cleaner, but the air will improve too.

Members of the Public Works, Infrastructure and Environment committee have approved spending just over $2 million for eight street sweepers. Chris Hill, the manager of central fleet, said the proposal is a great deal because the company, The Equipment Specialist Inc., is offering a savings to Hamilton and Toronto, which have been involved in a 16-month joint tendering proposal process. For the price of six street sweepers, Hamilton will receive eight street sweepers.

Hamilton has 17 street sweepers, including three that are supplied by private contractors, said Hill. Six machines are due for replacement.

The company can deliver one of the street sweepers immediately, with the rest of the sweepers, which are Tymco DST-6 models, available to the city by May.

The Tymco machine passed all the road, fuel and emissions tests during a demonstration phase in Toronto, said Hill.

Numerous tests and the Medical Officer of Health have pointed out that area residents are suffering poor health effects from the high particulate matter along Hamilton's streets and walkways.

The city's roadways are a primary contributor to the pollution.

"Next to snow clearing complaints, street sweeping were next," said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson. "There have been breakdowns. The service has become very frustrating for residents."

This is the first time city staff have purchased street sweepers since problems erupted when former employees bought two street sweepers for about $1 million over three years ago. The resulting publicity, revealed by Hamilton councillor Chad Collins, instigated an internal review. It found flaws in the city's purchasing and tender policies.

Politicians were slated to vote on the recommendation at their January 25 council meeting.

TOUGHER PROCESS FOR LIBERTY ENERGY

Hamilton politicians have asked the provincial Environment Ministry to conduct a full environmental assessment on the incinerator application made by Liberty Energy last June for a Strathearne Avenue location.

Liberty Energy applied for a zoning permit to construct an electrical generating facility. The city hired Dillon Consulting to conduct a peer review of Liberty Energy's environmental noise study. The document stated that Liberty Energy had "generally met" the requirements of an electricity project environmental assessment. But the consultants did have some concerns about technical issues and the EA process.

Representatives of Hamilton's waste reduction task force last week urged councillors to ask the province to conduct a more comprehensive environmental assessment on the project.

Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla, who opposes the application, said Liberty Energy is proposing an incinerator in a part of the city that is "overly-intensified."

Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina, who supports Liberty Energy's project, said he found Liberty Energy officials "forthright and forthcoming."

Councillors' recommendation was sent to the MoE on January 17 in order to meet the deadline for public comment on the application set by the province.

City council debates street sweepers and Liberty Energy

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CLEAN STREETS AND AIR

Not only will Hamilton's streets be cleaner, but the air will improve too.

Members of the Public Works, Infrastructure and Environment committee have approved spending just over $2 million for eight street sweepers. Chris Hill, the manager of central fleet, said the proposal is a great deal because the company, The Equipment Specialist Inc., is offering a savings to Hamilton and Toronto, which have been involved in a 16-month joint tendering proposal process. For the price of six street sweepers, Hamilton will receive eight street sweepers.

Hamilton has 17 street sweepers, including three that are supplied by private contractors, said Hill. Six machines are due for replacement.

The company can deliver one of the street sweepers immediately, with the rest of the sweepers, which are Tymco DST-6 models, available to the city by May.

The Tymco machine passed all the road, fuel and emissions tests during a demonstration phase in Toronto, said Hill.

Numerous tests and the Medical Officer of Health have pointed out that area residents are suffering poor health effects from the high particulate matter along Hamilton's streets and walkways.

The city's roadways are a primary contributor to the pollution.

"Next to snow clearing complaints, street sweeping were next," said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson. "There have been breakdowns. The service has become very frustrating for residents."

This is the first time city staff have purchased street sweepers since problems erupted when former employees bought two street sweepers for about $1 million over three years ago. The resulting publicity, revealed by Hamilton councillor Chad Collins, instigated an internal review. It found flaws in the city's purchasing and tender policies.

Politicians were slated to vote on the recommendation at their January 25 council meeting.

TOUGHER PROCESS FOR LIBERTY ENERGY

Hamilton politicians have asked the provincial Environment Ministry to conduct a full environmental assessment on the incinerator application made by Liberty Energy last June for a Strathearne Avenue location.

Liberty Energy applied for a zoning permit to construct an electrical generating facility. The city hired Dillon Consulting to conduct a peer review of Liberty Energy's environmental noise study. The document stated that Liberty Energy had "generally met" the requirements of an electricity project environmental assessment. But the consultants did have some concerns about technical issues and the EA process.

Representatives of Hamilton's waste reduction task force last week urged councillors to ask the province to conduct a more comprehensive environmental assessment on the project.

Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla, who opposes the application, said Liberty Energy is proposing an incinerator in a part of the city that is "overly-intensified."

Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina, who supports Liberty Energy's project, said he found Liberty Energy officials "forthright and forthcoming."

Councillors' recommendation was sent to the MoE on January 17 in order to meet the deadline for public comment on the application set by the province.