Feeling blue

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

"Though voter anger is palpable, it is clear that many are torn going into this election, meaning a minority government is likely. Without the buy-in of others, minority governments find it very difficult to enact broad change. If there is no clear victor on June 28, then expect to be back at the polls within two years. But for now, trust is a key election plank for a disgusted and cynical electorate, and finally they have a choice.

On June 28, they can vote for the leader they fear will disappoint them, or the one that already has."

-Flamborough Review, June 25, 2004

Nineteen months ago, like many voters, we were not prepared to exonerate Paul Martin's Liberals of all involvement in the sponsorship scandal. Nor were we fully ready to endorse an unproven leader, Stephen Harper. At the time, this newspaper believed Martin and Harper represented the flip sides of the coin - one a known quantity, the other bearing the fear of the unknown.

While we still believe the Liberals and Conservatives are the only two credible choices to lead our country, we can't support Martin in his bid for reelection.

In many of the prime minister's speeches, whether it be about getting tough on crime, bringing accountability to government or improving social programs, we have heard him begin sentences with the phrase, "We are going to..."

The fact remains the Liberals have held power for 13 years and, while they have done a credible job in dealing with the deficit and building a surplus, one can't help but wonder how much more time do they need to fix the other issues that ail this country?

We can't forget -- nor should voters -- the sponsorship scandal. High-level Liberals misused millions of taxpayers' dollars - yet they want Canadians to see past that. Coupled with the billion dollar human resources boondoggle, the flawed and costly gun registry, an RCMP investigation into the possibility that sensitive income trust information may have been leaked through the federal finance ministry and now the Option Canada scandal, one can only wonder what we can expect next from the party entrusted with OUR money for the past 13 years.

Throughout this campaign, Martin has often looked unprepared, doddering and unfocused - not exactly prime ministerial.

Referring again to our editorial before the 2004 election we wrote: "Still, there are many questions about the Conservatives, from their fiscal platform to their readiness for power. The social conservatism of some of its members has spooked many Canadians, who pride themselves on a laissez-faire approach to morality issues."

Then, we felt that Stephen Harper was just one election away from proving he was ready to represent the interests of all Canadians, not just Westerners.

To be sure, Harper's Conservatives have run a better campaign. He has managed to temper the reservations many Canadians have about him and some members of his party. He has managed to keep in check - or eliminate - the radical right wingers the former Reform party was infamous for. More elected Tories from Ontario would only strengthen the party and keep it from listing too far to the right.

The Conservatives have laid out an ambitious platform that we believe would deal seriously with criminals, benefit the provinces, bring more accountability to government and be better for many Canadians. While we are not naive enough to believe a Conservative government would be immune to scandal, we believe the Tories have earned the right to govern.

We temper our support with a hope that Harper's Conservatives earn only a minority government, giving us the automatic accountability that comes in knowing their every move is being watched

We have made our choice -- albeit with reservations.

Feeling blue

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

"Though voter anger is palpable, it is clear that many are torn going into this election, meaning a minority government is likely. Without the buy-in of others, minority governments find it very difficult to enact broad change. If there is no clear victor on June 28, then expect to be back at the polls within two years. But for now, trust is a key election plank for a disgusted and cynical electorate, and finally they have a choice.

On June 28, they can vote for the leader they fear will disappoint them, or the one that already has."

-Flamborough Review, June 25, 2004

Nineteen months ago, like many voters, we were not prepared to exonerate Paul Martin's Liberals of all involvement in the sponsorship scandal. Nor were we fully ready to endorse an unproven leader, Stephen Harper. At the time, this newspaper believed Martin and Harper represented the flip sides of the coin - one a known quantity, the other bearing the fear of the unknown.

While we still believe the Liberals and Conservatives are the only two credible choices to lead our country, we can't support Martin in his bid for reelection.

In many of the prime minister's speeches, whether it be about getting tough on crime, bringing accountability to government or improving social programs, we have heard him begin sentences with the phrase, "We are going to..."

The fact remains the Liberals have held power for 13 years and, while they have done a credible job in dealing with the deficit and building a surplus, one can't help but wonder how much more time do they need to fix the other issues that ail this country?

We can't forget -- nor should voters -- the sponsorship scandal. High-level Liberals misused millions of taxpayers' dollars - yet they want Canadians to see past that. Coupled with the billion dollar human resources boondoggle, the flawed and costly gun registry, an RCMP investigation into the possibility that sensitive income trust information may have been leaked through the federal finance ministry and now the Option Canada scandal, one can only wonder what we can expect next from the party entrusted with OUR money for the past 13 years.

Throughout this campaign, Martin has often looked unprepared, doddering and unfocused - not exactly prime ministerial.

Referring again to our editorial before the 2004 election we wrote: "Still, there are many questions about the Conservatives, from their fiscal platform to their readiness for power. The social conservatism of some of its members has spooked many Canadians, who pride themselves on a laissez-faire approach to morality issues."

Then, we felt that Stephen Harper was just one election away from proving he was ready to represent the interests of all Canadians, not just Westerners.

To be sure, Harper's Conservatives have run a better campaign. He has managed to temper the reservations many Canadians have about him and some members of his party. He has managed to keep in check - or eliminate - the radical right wingers the former Reform party was infamous for. More elected Tories from Ontario would only strengthen the party and keep it from listing too far to the right.

The Conservatives have laid out an ambitious platform that we believe would deal seriously with criminals, benefit the provinces, bring more accountability to government and be better for many Canadians. While we are not naive enough to believe a Conservative government would be immune to scandal, we believe the Tories have earned the right to govern.

We temper our support with a hope that Harper's Conservatives earn only a minority government, giving us the automatic accountability that comes in knowing their every move is being watched

We have made our choice -- albeit with reservations.

Feeling blue

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

"Though voter anger is palpable, it is clear that many are torn going into this election, meaning a minority government is likely. Without the buy-in of others, minority governments find it very difficult to enact broad change. If there is no clear victor on June 28, then expect to be back at the polls within two years. But for now, trust is a key election plank for a disgusted and cynical electorate, and finally they have a choice.

On June 28, they can vote for the leader they fear will disappoint them, or the one that already has."

-Flamborough Review, June 25, 2004

Nineteen months ago, like many voters, we were not prepared to exonerate Paul Martin's Liberals of all involvement in the sponsorship scandal. Nor were we fully ready to endorse an unproven leader, Stephen Harper. At the time, this newspaper believed Martin and Harper represented the flip sides of the coin - one a known quantity, the other bearing the fear of the unknown.

While we still believe the Liberals and Conservatives are the only two credible choices to lead our country, we can't support Martin in his bid for reelection.

In many of the prime minister's speeches, whether it be about getting tough on crime, bringing accountability to government or improving social programs, we have heard him begin sentences with the phrase, "We are going to..."

The fact remains the Liberals have held power for 13 years and, while they have done a credible job in dealing with the deficit and building a surplus, one can't help but wonder how much more time do they need to fix the other issues that ail this country?

We can't forget -- nor should voters -- the sponsorship scandal. High-level Liberals misused millions of taxpayers' dollars - yet they want Canadians to see past that. Coupled with the billion dollar human resources boondoggle, the flawed and costly gun registry, an RCMP investigation into the possibility that sensitive income trust information may have been leaked through the federal finance ministry and now the Option Canada scandal, one can only wonder what we can expect next from the party entrusted with OUR money for the past 13 years.

Throughout this campaign, Martin has often looked unprepared, doddering and unfocused - not exactly prime ministerial.

Referring again to our editorial before the 2004 election we wrote: "Still, there are many questions about the Conservatives, from their fiscal platform to their readiness for power. The social conservatism of some of its members has spooked many Canadians, who pride themselves on a laissez-faire approach to morality issues."

Then, we felt that Stephen Harper was just one election away from proving he was ready to represent the interests of all Canadians, not just Westerners.

To be sure, Harper's Conservatives have run a better campaign. He has managed to temper the reservations many Canadians have about him and some members of his party. He has managed to keep in check - or eliminate - the radical right wingers the former Reform party was infamous for. More elected Tories from Ontario would only strengthen the party and keep it from listing too far to the right.

The Conservatives have laid out an ambitious platform that we believe would deal seriously with criminals, benefit the provinces, bring more accountability to government and be better for many Canadians. While we are not naive enough to believe a Conservative government would be immune to scandal, we believe the Tories have earned the right to govern.

We temper our support with a hope that Harper's Conservatives earn only a minority government, giving us the automatic accountability that comes in knowing their every move is being watched

We have made our choice -- albeit with reservations.