Sow a seed and grow a little history this spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Start thinking of spring, with seeds that may have descended to us from Roman times. You can hear and see all about it at St. James United Church, presented by the Flamborough Heritage Society.

Mrs. Anne Charlton has evolved a small family-owned seed nursery out of a passion for history and gardening. Throughout the ages, medieval monks, Renaissance monarchs, early North American colonists, Impressionist painters and 20th century writers have found inspiration, solace and contentment in the growing of plants. The ancestors of our seeds have graced the courtyards of Roman Villas, watched the building of great cathedrals, survived ocean crossings and played a vital role in the lives of North American native peoples.

By offering seeds from history, Charlton hopes to encourage the cultivation of plants popular in past centuries and often ignored today, to raise awareness of our many reliable and easily grown native plants, and to promote gardens that cater to beneficial wildlife. Most of all, Charlton is keen to bring you the spiritual sustenance that they have been giving to our ancestors down through the ages. As we pour over the ever-popular seed catalogues, we can think about those early pioneer gardeners.

Six years ago, Charlton started Priory Seeds in Ancaster by combining her life long interest in history with her avid love of gardening. She has degrees in Fine Art and History, and has taken horticulture courses at Mohawk and the Historic Landscape Institute at the University of Virginia. Her big interest is in flowers and old roses, but it's also expanding to shrubs, trees, and woodland gardens.

She is also Vice Chair of the Hamilton Municipal Heritage Committee [LACAC] and is actively involved in the very successful "Doors Open" events.

The Flamborough Heritage Society has been recording local history for the past 32 years to ensure our heritage for future generations. This includes the publication of several acclaimed books, and the operation of the Flamborough Archives. All the details are included in their website at www.wefhs.hamilton.ca

With slides and displays, Anne will bring all this into focus at the monthly meeting of the Flamborough Heritage Society on Friday, February 24, at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of St James United Church, 306 Parkside Drive, Waterdown. Admission is free, refreshments will be served served and parking is convenient.

What

FHS meets at St. James United Church

When

Friday, February 24, 8 p.m.

Sow a seed and grow a little history this spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Start thinking of spring, with seeds that may have descended to us from Roman times. You can hear and see all about it at St. James United Church, presented by the Flamborough Heritage Society.

Mrs. Anne Charlton has evolved a small family-owned seed nursery out of a passion for history and gardening. Throughout the ages, medieval monks, Renaissance monarchs, early North American colonists, Impressionist painters and 20th century writers have found inspiration, solace and contentment in the growing of plants. The ancestors of our seeds have graced the courtyards of Roman Villas, watched the building of great cathedrals, survived ocean crossings and played a vital role in the lives of North American native peoples.

By offering seeds from history, Charlton hopes to encourage the cultivation of plants popular in past centuries and often ignored today, to raise awareness of our many reliable and easily grown native plants, and to promote gardens that cater to beneficial wildlife. Most of all, Charlton is keen to bring you the spiritual sustenance that they have been giving to our ancestors down through the ages. As we pour over the ever-popular seed catalogues, we can think about those early pioneer gardeners.

Six years ago, Charlton started Priory Seeds in Ancaster by combining her life long interest in history with her avid love of gardening. She has degrees in Fine Art and History, and has taken horticulture courses at Mohawk and the Historic Landscape Institute at the University of Virginia. Her big interest is in flowers and old roses, but it's also expanding to shrubs, trees, and woodland gardens.

She is also Vice Chair of the Hamilton Municipal Heritage Committee [LACAC] and is actively involved in the very successful "Doors Open" events.

The Flamborough Heritage Society has been recording local history for the past 32 years to ensure our heritage for future generations. This includes the publication of several acclaimed books, and the operation of the Flamborough Archives. All the details are included in their website at www.wefhs.hamilton.ca

With slides and displays, Anne will bring all this into focus at the monthly meeting of the Flamborough Heritage Society on Friday, February 24, at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of St James United Church, 306 Parkside Drive, Waterdown. Admission is free, refreshments will be served served and parking is convenient.

What

FHS meets at St. James United Church

When

Friday, February 24, 8 p.m.

Sow a seed and grow a little history this spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Start thinking of spring, with seeds that may have descended to us from Roman times. You can hear and see all about it at St. James United Church, presented by the Flamborough Heritage Society.

Mrs. Anne Charlton has evolved a small family-owned seed nursery out of a passion for history and gardening. Throughout the ages, medieval monks, Renaissance monarchs, early North American colonists, Impressionist painters and 20th century writers have found inspiration, solace and contentment in the growing of plants. The ancestors of our seeds have graced the courtyards of Roman Villas, watched the building of great cathedrals, survived ocean crossings and played a vital role in the lives of North American native peoples.

By offering seeds from history, Charlton hopes to encourage the cultivation of plants popular in past centuries and often ignored today, to raise awareness of our many reliable and easily grown native plants, and to promote gardens that cater to beneficial wildlife. Most of all, Charlton is keen to bring you the spiritual sustenance that they have been giving to our ancestors down through the ages. As we pour over the ever-popular seed catalogues, we can think about those early pioneer gardeners.

Six years ago, Charlton started Priory Seeds in Ancaster by combining her life long interest in history with her avid love of gardening. She has degrees in Fine Art and History, and has taken horticulture courses at Mohawk and the Historic Landscape Institute at the University of Virginia. Her big interest is in flowers and old roses, but it's also expanding to shrubs, trees, and woodland gardens.

She is also Vice Chair of the Hamilton Municipal Heritage Committee [LACAC] and is actively involved in the very successful "Doors Open" events.

The Flamborough Heritage Society has been recording local history for the past 32 years to ensure our heritage for future generations. This includes the publication of several acclaimed books, and the operation of the Flamborough Archives. All the details are included in their website at www.wefhs.hamilton.ca

With slides and displays, Anne will bring all this into focus at the monthly meeting of the Flamborough Heritage Society on Friday, February 24, at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of St James United Church, 306 Parkside Drive, Waterdown. Admission is free, refreshments will be served served and parking is convenient.

What

FHS meets at St. James United Church

When

Friday, February 24, 8 p.m.