Carlisle wells to be ready by spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the first time in a long time, it's going to be a wet summer in Carlisle.

But even as city water officials tout the upgrades to the village's communal well system that will put an end to the annual watering ban imposed on the homes on the system, they are urging that voluntary conservation efforts continue.

Carlisle has traditionally been served by four wells. But because two were located in close proximity to one another, they could not function simultaneously as production wells; over the past several months, one has been upgraded from a monitoring well to a production well, and a new production well has been added to the system. When all come onstream early this spring, the water capacity in the village will increase from 28.3 litres per second, to 40.1 litres per second.

"We are all set and on schedule," confirmed Abdul Khan, Director of Water and Wastewater Treatment for the City of Hamilton. "We're pretty confident we will complete the project and will have the system commissioned by the middle to the end of April."

A Public Information Centre was slated for this week, seeking input on the final leg of the project, on issues including the decommissioning of the closed well, as well as the associated treatment system and wellhouse. And while construction of fencing and the interior of the new wellhouse will continue into May, Khan is confident that the $1.5-million project will be complete before summer.

"By the middle of May we will be all set," he said. "I'm very confident that the system will be available by then. Hopefully this time we will be able to deal with water issues in Carlisle."

The upgrades have come none too soon for Ward 15 councillor Margaret McCarthy, who pointed out that the village's water woes loomed as far back as 1992, with the first development of new homes in the area.

"When I first came to (Flamborough) council, I attended planning meetings for the Palomino subdivision," she noted.

"There have been historic water problems in Carlisle."

Although the new wells will put an end to the strict watering bans issued - and enforced by patrolling by-law officers - every summer for the past four years, McCarthy warns that conservation will still be key to keeping the taps on during the hot summer months.

"Doubling the current supply still may not be enough," she said.

"Residents are aware that there is not an endless supply of water."

Carlisle wells to be ready by spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the first time in a long time, it's going to be a wet summer in Carlisle.

But even as city water officials tout the upgrades to the village's communal well system that will put an end to the annual watering ban imposed on the homes on the system, they are urging that voluntary conservation efforts continue.

Carlisle has traditionally been served by four wells. But because two were located in close proximity to one another, they could not function simultaneously as production wells; over the past several months, one has been upgraded from a monitoring well to a production well, and a new production well has been added to the system. When all come onstream early this spring, the water capacity in the village will increase from 28.3 litres per second, to 40.1 litres per second.

"We are all set and on schedule," confirmed Abdul Khan, Director of Water and Wastewater Treatment for the City of Hamilton. "We're pretty confident we will complete the project and will have the system commissioned by the middle to the end of April."

A Public Information Centre was slated for this week, seeking input on the final leg of the project, on issues including the decommissioning of the closed well, as well as the associated treatment system and wellhouse. And while construction of fencing and the interior of the new wellhouse will continue into May, Khan is confident that the $1.5-million project will be complete before summer.

"By the middle of May we will be all set," he said. "I'm very confident that the system will be available by then. Hopefully this time we will be able to deal with water issues in Carlisle."

The upgrades have come none too soon for Ward 15 councillor Margaret McCarthy, who pointed out that the village's water woes loomed as far back as 1992, with the first development of new homes in the area.

"When I first came to (Flamborough) council, I attended planning meetings for the Palomino subdivision," she noted.

"There have been historic water problems in Carlisle."

Although the new wells will put an end to the strict watering bans issued - and enforced by patrolling by-law officers - every summer for the past four years, McCarthy warns that conservation will still be key to keeping the taps on during the hot summer months.

"Doubling the current supply still may not be enough," she said.

"Residents are aware that there is not an endless supply of water."

Carlisle wells to be ready by spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For the first time in a long time, it's going to be a wet summer in Carlisle.

But even as city water officials tout the upgrades to the village's communal well system that will put an end to the annual watering ban imposed on the homes on the system, they are urging that voluntary conservation efforts continue.

Carlisle has traditionally been served by four wells. But because two were located in close proximity to one another, they could not function simultaneously as production wells; over the past several months, one has been upgraded from a monitoring well to a production well, and a new production well has been added to the system. When all come onstream early this spring, the water capacity in the village will increase from 28.3 litres per second, to 40.1 litres per second.

"We are all set and on schedule," confirmed Abdul Khan, Director of Water and Wastewater Treatment for the City of Hamilton. "We're pretty confident we will complete the project and will have the system commissioned by the middle to the end of April."

A Public Information Centre was slated for this week, seeking input on the final leg of the project, on issues including the decommissioning of the closed well, as well as the associated treatment system and wellhouse. And while construction of fencing and the interior of the new wellhouse will continue into May, Khan is confident that the $1.5-million project will be complete before summer.

"By the middle of May we will be all set," he said. "I'm very confident that the system will be available by then. Hopefully this time we will be able to deal with water issues in Carlisle."

The upgrades have come none too soon for Ward 15 councillor Margaret McCarthy, who pointed out that the village's water woes loomed as far back as 1992, with the first development of new homes in the area.

"When I first came to (Flamborough) council, I attended planning meetings for the Palomino subdivision," she noted.

"There have been historic water problems in Carlisle."

Although the new wells will put an end to the strict watering bans issued - and enforced by patrolling by-law officers - every summer for the past four years, McCarthy warns that conservation will still be key to keeping the taps on during the hot summer months.

"Doubling the current supply still may not be enough," she said.

"Residents are aware that there is not an endless supply of water."