MNR fishing for comments

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario government is seeking public comment on proposed new ecologically-based fishing regulations that would further protect the province's biodiversity, announced Natural Resources Minister David Ramsay.

"We are streamlining the regulations and simplifying the large list of exceptions which were difficult for anglers to know and follow," said Ramsay. "We are also creating more fishing opportunities by extending seasons or removing unnecessary season closures where there aren't sustainability issues for native fish populations."

The proposed regulation changes are part of the ministry's new ecological framework for recreational fisheries management in Ontario announced last year. This includes managing fisheries on a zone basis rather than on an individual lake basis and reducing the number of fishing divisions to 20 zones from 37. The new Fisheries Management Zones are based on ecological and social factors and easy-to-find boundaries. These zones would go into effect in 2007. The ministry has set out recommended seasons and creel and size limits for all regulated sport fish species for 2007 for the new zones. Most anglers will not notice much difference but in some areas the alteration in boundaries will mean changes in fishing seasons and fishing limits. Also proposed are protective regulations for some native populations such as brook trout, lake trout and lake sturgeon, to enhance biodiversity.

"The new regulations would better serve the needs of anglers while ensuring fish populations remain healthy now and in the future," said Ramsay.

The ministry is posting the proposed regulations for the new fisheries zones on the Environmental Bill of Rights Registry for 60 days for public comment. To view the notice, visit www.ene.gov.on.ca/samples/search/ and enter Registry Number XB06E6001.

MNR fishing for comments

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario government is seeking public comment on proposed new ecologically-based fishing regulations that would further protect the province's biodiversity, announced Natural Resources Minister David Ramsay.

"We are streamlining the regulations and simplifying the large list of exceptions which were difficult for anglers to know and follow," said Ramsay. "We are also creating more fishing opportunities by extending seasons or removing unnecessary season closures where there aren't sustainability issues for native fish populations."

The proposed regulation changes are part of the ministry's new ecological framework for recreational fisheries management in Ontario announced last year. This includes managing fisheries on a zone basis rather than on an individual lake basis and reducing the number of fishing divisions to 20 zones from 37. The new Fisheries Management Zones are based on ecological and social factors and easy-to-find boundaries. These zones would go into effect in 2007. The ministry has set out recommended seasons and creel and size limits for all regulated sport fish species for 2007 for the new zones. Most anglers will not notice much difference but in some areas the alteration in boundaries will mean changes in fishing seasons and fishing limits. Also proposed are protective regulations for some native populations such as brook trout, lake trout and lake sturgeon, to enhance biodiversity.

"The new regulations would better serve the needs of anglers while ensuring fish populations remain healthy now and in the future," said Ramsay.

The ministry is posting the proposed regulations for the new fisheries zones on the Environmental Bill of Rights Registry for 60 days for public comment. To view the notice, visit www.ene.gov.on.ca/samples/search/ and enter Registry Number XB06E6001.

MNR fishing for comments

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario government is seeking public comment on proposed new ecologically-based fishing regulations that would further protect the province's biodiversity, announced Natural Resources Minister David Ramsay.

"We are streamlining the regulations and simplifying the large list of exceptions which were difficult for anglers to know and follow," said Ramsay. "We are also creating more fishing opportunities by extending seasons or removing unnecessary season closures where there aren't sustainability issues for native fish populations."

The proposed regulation changes are part of the ministry's new ecological framework for recreational fisheries management in Ontario announced last year. This includes managing fisheries on a zone basis rather than on an individual lake basis and reducing the number of fishing divisions to 20 zones from 37. The new Fisheries Management Zones are based on ecological and social factors and easy-to-find boundaries. These zones would go into effect in 2007. The ministry has set out recommended seasons and creel and size limits for all regulated sport fish species for 2007 for the new zones. Most anglers will not notice much difference but in some areas the alteration in boundaries will mean changes in fishing seasons and fishing limits. Also proposed are protective regulations for some native populations such as brook trout, lake trout and lake sturgeon, to enhance biodiversity.

"The new regulations would better serve the needs of anglers while ensuring fish populations remain healthy now and in the future," said Ramsay.

The ministry is posting the proposed regulations for the new fisheries zones on the Environmental Bill of Rights Registry for 60 days for public comment. To view the notice, visit www.ene.gov.on.ca/samples/search/ and enter Registry Number XB06E6001.