Gino's break-in 'a lot of work for nothing'

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Would-be thieves created havoc, and hefty repair bills for two local merchants, after an elaborate break-in scheme turned sour.

On February 4, thieves climbed onto the roof of Gino's Pizza, where they cut the pipe, which vents the pizza ovens, according to Gino's owner Paul Majer.

He suspects they were trying to access the building by crawling through the ventilation system. But when that didn't work, they decided to do things the old-fashioned way, and broke down the back door. But it wasn't pizza they were after - it was access to the convenience store next door.

So the culprits went into Majer's office, and began breaking a hole in the wall. When it proved too hard, they tried again on another wall, breaking through concrete blocks. But instead of gaining unrestricted access to cash and cigarettes - the usual targets for thieves - the culprits found themselves in a storage room. "There was nothing valuable in there," said Majer.

Their plan foiled, the suspects went to the outside of the plaza, where they attempted to break down the convenience store doors. The commotion set off the store's alarms, and the culprits fled.

Although they didn't get what they came for, they didn't leave empty-handed; they managed to scrounge a small quantity of cash from Gino's, said Majer. But his newly repaired walls and ventilation system, and his newly installed alarm system should prevent a repeat performance.

Majer said the restaurant has never been broken into before, and he was surprised to have it happen. "There's nothing to steal in a pizza shop," he said. "It was a lot of work for nothing."

Gino's break-in 'a lot of work for nothing'

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Would-be thieves created havoc, and hefty repair bills for two local merchants, after an elaborate break-in scheme turned sour.

On February 4, thieves climbed onto the roof of Gino's Pizza, where they cut the pipe, which vents the pizza ovens, according to Gino's owner Paul Majer.

He suspects they were trying to access the building by crawling through the ventilation system. But when that didn't work, they decided to do things the old-fashioned way, and broke down the back door. But it wasn't pizza they were after - it was access to the convenience store next door.

So the culprits went into Majer's office, and began breaking a hole in the wall. When it proved too hard, they tried again on another wall, breaking through concrete blocks. But instead of gaining unrestricted access to cash and cigarettes - the usual targets for thieves - the culprits found themselves in a storage room. "There was nothing valuable in there," said Majer.

Their plan foiled, the suspects went to the outside of the plaza, where they attempted to break down the convenience store doors. The commotion set off the store's alarms, and the culprits fled.

Although they didn't get what they came for, they didn't leave empty-handed; they managed to scrounge a small quantity of cash from Gino's, said Majer. But his newly repaired walls and ventilation system, and his newly installed alarm system should prevent a repeat performance.

Majer said the restaurant has never been broken into before, and he was surprised to have it happen. "There's nothing to steal in a pizza shop," he said. "It was a lot of work for nothing."

Gino's break-in 'a lot of work for nothing'

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Would-be thieves created havoc, and hefty repair bills for two local merchants, after an elaborate break-in scheme turned sour.

On February 4, thieves climbed onto the roof of Gino's Pizza, where they cut the pipe, which vents the pizza ovens, according to Gino's owner Paul Majer.

He suspects they were trying to access the building by crawling through the ventilation system. But when that didn't work, they decided to do things the old-fashioned way, and broke down the back door. But it wasn't pizza they were after - it was access to the convenience store next door.

So the culprits went into Majer's office, and began breaking a hole in the wall. When it proved too hard, they tried again on another wall, breaking through concrete blocks. But instead of gaining unrestricted access to cash and cigarettes - the usual targets for thieves - the culprits found themselves in a storage room. "There was nothing valuable in there," said Majer.

Their plan foiled, the suspects went to the outside of the plaza, where they attempted to break down the convenience store doors. The commotion set off the store's alarms, and the culprits fled.

Although they didn't get what they came for, they didn't leave empty-handed; they managed to scrounge a small quantity of cash from Gino's, said Majer. But his newly repaired walls and ventilation system, and his newly installed alarm system should prevent a repeat performance.

Majer said the restaurant has never been broken into before, and he was surprised to have it happen. "There's nothing to steal in a pizza shop," he said. "It was a lot of work for nothing."