MPAC report submitted for review

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario Ombudsman, Andre Martin, has concluded his investigation into the Municipal Property Assessment Commission (MPAC). A preliminary report has been released to stakeholders, including MPAC officials and Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, for review. It will be made public within a month, according to a press release issued by the office.

MPAC is the arms-length organization responsible for assessing every property in Ontario. That assessment is a factor in the level of taxes a property owner is charged.

The investigation was launched on October 17, as a response to a 50 per cent spike in complaints about the organization, including concerns from several Ontario mayors. The majority of the concerns surrounded the transparency of the assessment process; many property owners feel they have little or no information available on how their assessment was arrived at.

Others expressed concerns over the reassessment process, charging that MPAC provided little direction or assistance to those going through the process, and once through, many homeowners claimed that their next assessment didn't take the readjustment into account.

The investigative team received 3,500 complaints, and performed 150 interviews with stakeholders and MPAC officials, and has reviewed thousands of pages of documentation to complete the report. Due to the scope of the investigation, nearly the entire Ombudsman staff was enlisted to support the team.

The stakeholders have 10 days to comment on the report, and address any concerns with the process or results. It will be finalized and released to the public shortly after.

MPAC report submitted for review

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario Ombudsman, Andre Martin, has concluded his investigation into the Municipal Property Assessment Commission (MPAC). A preliminary report has been released to stakeholders, including MPAC officials and Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, for review. It will be made public within a month, according to a press release issued by the office.

MPAC is the arms-length organization responsible for assessing every property in Ontario. That assessment is a factor in the level of taxes a property owner is charged.

The investigation was launched on October 17, as a response to a 50 per cent spike in complaints about the organization, including concerns from several Ontario mayors. The majority of the concerns surrounded the transparency of the assessment process; many property owners feel they have little or no information available on how their assessment was arrived at.

Others expressed concerns over the reassessment process, charging that MPAC provided little direction or assistance to those going through the process, and once through, many homeowners claimed that their next assessment didn't take the readjustment into account.

The investigative team received 3,500 complaints, and performed 150 interviews with stakeholders and MPAC officials, and has reviewed thousands of pages of documentation to complete the report. Due to the scope of the investigation, nearly the entire Ombudsman staff was enlisted to support the team.

The stakeholders have 10 days to comment on the report, and address any concerns with the process or results. It will be finalized and released to the public shortly after.

MPAC report submitted for review

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Ontario Ombudsman, Andre Martin, has concluded his investigation into the Municipal Property Assessment Commission (MPAC). A preliminary report has been released to stakeholders, including MPAC officials and Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, for review. It will be made public within a month, according to a press release issued by the office.

MPAC is the arms-length organization responsible for assessing every property in Ontario. That assessment is a factor in the level of taxes a property owner is charged.

The investigation was launched on October 17, as a response to a 50 per cent spike in complaints about the organization, including concerns from several Ontario mayors. The majority of the concerns surrounded the transparency of the assessment process; many property owners feel they have little or no information available on how their assessment was arrived at.

Others expressed concerns over the reassessment process, charging that MPAC provided little direction or assistance to those going through the process, and once through, many homeowners claimed that their next assessment didn't take the readjustment into account.

The investigative team received 3,500 complaints, and performed 150 interviews with stakeholders and MPAC officials, and has reviewed thousands of pages of documentation to complete the report. Due to the scope of the investigation, nearly the entire Ombudsman staff was enlisted to support the team.

The stakeholders have 10 days to comment on the report, and address any concerns with the process or results. It will be finalized and released to the public shortly after.