A timely message from the heart

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

We have all been warned, but are we paying attention?

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada recently said that the wave of Baby Boomers celebrating their 60th birthdays could be the "first generation to turn back the clock and experience a decline in quality of life."

This is all thanks to being overweight and leading a sedentary lifestyle - certainly not something that should be passed along to future generations.

The heart and stroke foundation said the rates of obesity in Boomers have soared by nearly 60 per cent and 52 per cent are inactive.

According to Dr. Beth Abramson, Heart and Stroke Foundation spokesperson and cardiologist: "Boomers are certainly not headed in the right direction."

As February is Heart and Stroke Month, we thought it important to remind readers that eating properly and engaging in an active lifestyle might help ward off a debilitating stroke or heart attack.

When you consider that a third of all deaths in Canada are caused by heart disease and stroke it is imperative for those of us who are inactive to join the fitness bandwagon.

It also takes commitment and a healthy dose of common sense to fight the battle of the bulge.

Parents should remember that good eating practices begin at home. Sit down and have a nutritious breakfast to start the day. A bowl of cereal and a piece of fresh fruit can get the day off to a good start in more ways than one.

We are all guilty of eating on the fly, often with little or no thought given to weekly meal planning. Our lives are busy so heading to a fast-food outlet becomes an easy way to fix the nightly dinner. It is also an excuse. Any dietitian will tell you that there are quick and simple ways to prepare healthful meals. You have to be willing to adjust your lifestyle.

The foundation is also hoping the federal government will follow through on its election promises such as providing a tax credit for parents who enroll their children in programs that promote physical activity.

However, let's be honest with ourselves, no amount of facts and figures will stave of this looming health care crisis. It is up to each individual to take charge of their own lives and that of their offspring. It doesn't matter if the government offers a tax incentive if people continue to reach for fatty foods as they watch television or use the computer.

Keeping fit to the best of your ability is within your control - you have no one to blame but yourself.

A timely message from the heart

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

We have all been warned, but are we paying attention?

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada recently said that the wave of Baby Boomers celebrating their 60th birthdays could be the "first generation to turn back the clock and experience a decline in quality of life."

This is all thanks to being overweight and leading a sedentary lifestyle - certainly not something that should be passed along to future generations.

The heart and stroke foundation said the rates of obesity in Boomers have soared by nearly 60 per cent and 52 per cent are inactive.

According to Dr. Beth Abramson, Heart and Stroke Foundation spokesperson and cardiologist: "Boomers are certainly not headed in the right direction."

As February is Heart and Stroke Month, we thought it important to remind readers that eating properly and engaging in an active lifestyle might help ward off a debilitating stroke or heart attack.

When you consider that a third of all deaths in Canada are caused by heart disease and stroke it is imperative for those of us who are inactive to join the fitness bandwagon.

It also takes commitment and a healthy dose of common sense to fight the battle of the bulge.

Parents should remember that good eating practices begin at home. Sit down and have a nutritious breakfast to start the day. A bowl of cereal and a piece of fresh fruit can get the day off to a good start in more ways than one.

We are all guilty of eating on the fly, often with little or no thought given to weekly meal planning. Our lives are busy so heading to a fast-food outlet becomes an easy way to fix the nightly dinner. It is also an excuse. Any dietitian will tell you that there are quick and simple ways to prepare healthful meals. You have to be willing to adjust your lifestyle.

The foundation is also hoping the federal government will follow through on its election promises such as providing a tax credit for parents who enroll their children in programs that promote physical activity.

However, let's be honest with ourselves, no amount of facts and figures will stave of this looming health care crisis. It is up to each individual to take charge of their own lives and that of their offspring. It doesn't matter if the government offers a tax incentive if people continue to reach for fatty foods as they watch television or use the computer.

Keeping fit to the best of your ability is within your control - you have no one to blame but yourself.

A timely message from the heart

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

We have all been warned, but are we paying attention?

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada recently said that the wave of Baby Boomers celebrating their 60th birthdays could be the "first generation to turn back the clock and experience a decline in quality of life."

This is all thanks to being overweight and leading a sedentary lifestyle - certainly not something that should be passed along to future generations.

The heart and stroke foundation said the rates of obesity in Boomers have soared by nearly 60 per cent and 52 per cent are inactive.

According to Dr. Beth Abramson, Heart and Stroke Foundation spokesperson and cardiologist: "Boomers are certainly not headed in the right direction."

As February is Heart and Stroke Month, we thought it important to remind readers that eating properly and engaging in an active lifestyle might help ward off a debilitating stroke or heart attack.

When you consider that a third of all deaths in Canada are caused by heart disease and stroke it is imperative for those of us who are inactive to join the fitness bandwagon.

It also takes commitment and a healthy dose of common sense to fight the battle of the bulge.

Parents should remember that good eating practices begin at home. Sit down and have a nutritious breakfast to start the day. A bowl of cereal and a piece of fresh fruit can get the day off to a good start in more ways than one.

We are all guilty of eating on the fly, often with little or no thought given to weekly meal planning. Our lives are busy so heading to a fast-food outlet becomes an easy way to fix the nightly dinner. It is also an excuse. Any dietitian will tell you that there are quick and simple ways to prepare healthful meals. You have to be willing to adjust your lifestyle.

The foundation is also hoping the federal government will follow through on its election promises such as providing a tax credit for parents who enroll their children in programs that promote physical activity.

However, let's be honest with ourselves, no amount of facts and figures will stave of this looming health care crisis. It is up to each individual to take charge of their own lives and that of their offspring. It doesn't matter if the government offers a tax incentive if people continue to reach for fatty foods as they watch television or use the computer.

Keeping fit to the best of your ability is within your control - you have no one to blame but yourself.