Entrepreneur hoping for a cover-up

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

What do you get when you take Canada's favourite drive-through treat, a bit of material and a desire to help the environment?

For Waterdown's Dan Dexel, it was that "aha" moment when a great idea is formed, and faster than you could say "double-double," Coffee Covers was born.

Dexel, who along with two partners runs a company that designs neoprene covers for propane tanks and water jugs, recalled thinking that there must be another use for the insulating fabric most commonly used for wetsuits. Then he thought about the coffee shop tradition of "double-cupping" to protect tender fingers from steaming paper cups.

"We had just got a shipment in, and we were excited," he said. "We started brainstorming, and I thought, 'Why not coffee?'"

Dexel started drawing up prototypes, and developed covers to fit medium, large and extra-large take-out cups. Neoprene is not just thin (1.5 mm thick) and durable, it provides a comfortable grip, and keeps the coffee - or tea, if you prefer - from cooling.

"I ran tests in five-degree weather, and the one with the coffee cover keeps the coffee warmer," he noted.

The covers are also washable and, of course, reuseable, noted Dexel, meaning all those extra cups stay out of the landfill. When not in use, the covers fold up neatly to fit into a pocket, purse, or glove box.

Dexel approached the City of Hamilton with the concept, and came away with an order for 500 covers in distinctive royal blue bearing the Waste Watch program logo. For now, the covers will just be distributed to employees, while staff gauges response to the product.

Coffee Covers is still in its infancy, and Dexel plans to approach local businesses that may be interested in ordering covers printed with their logos. He's also come up with several designs with catchy sayings such as "Hockey Mom" and "World's Greatest Dad" - and in different colours - that he hopes can be sold at gas station and convenience store counters.

Dexel applied for patent protection on Coffee Covers last year. The ultimate goal, he noted, would be to land a contract with a major coffee chain but he admits that's something his company needs to grow into. In the meantime, he's encouraged by the feedback he's had so far. "People have started seeing them, and asking about them," he said.

For more information, visit www.coffeecovers.com or e-mail Dexel at info@coffeecovers.com. He can also be reached at 905-320-6203.

Entrepreneur hoping for a cover-up

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

What do you get when you take Canada's favourite drive-through treat, a bit of material and a desire to help the environment?

For Waterdown's Dan Dexel, it was that "aha" moment when a great idea is formed, and faster than you could say "double-double," Coffee Covers was born.

Dexel, who along with two partners runs a company that designs neoprene covers for propane tanks and water jugs, recalled thinking that there must be another use for the insulating fabric most commonly used for wetsuits. Then he thought about the coffee shop tradition of "double-cupping" to protect tender fingers from steaming paper cups.

"We had just got a shipment in, and we were excited," he said. "We started brainstorming, and I thought, 'Why not coffee?'"

Dexel started drawing up prototypes, and developed covers to fit medium, large and extra-large take-out cups. Neoprene is not just thin (1.5 mm thick) and durable, it provides a comfortable grip, and keeps the coffee - or tea, if you prefer - from cooling.

"I ran tests in five-degree weather, and the one with the coffee cover keeps the coffee warmer," he noted.

The covers are also washable and, of course, reuseable, noted Dexel, meaning all those extra cups stay out of the landfill. When not in use, the covers fold up neatly to fit into a pocket, purse, or glove box.

Dexel approached the City of Hamilton with the concept, and came away with an order for 500 covers in distinctive royal blue bearing the Waste Watch program logo. For now, the covers will just be distributed to employees, while staff gauges response to the product.

Coffee Covers is still in its infancy, and Dexel plans to approach local businesses that may be interested in ordering covers printed with their logos. He's also come up with several designs with catchy sayings such as "Hockey Mom" and "World's Greatest Dad" - and in different colours - that he hopes can be sold at gas station and convenience store counters.

Dexel applied for patent protection on Coffee Covers last year. The ultimate goal, he noted, would be to land a contract with a major coffee chain but he admits that's something his company needs to grow into. In the meantime, he's encouraged by the feedback he's had so far. "People have started seeing them, and asking about them," he said.

For more information, visit www.coffeecovers.com or e-mail Dexel at info@coffeecovers.com. He can also be reached at 905-320-6203.

Entrepreneur hoping for a cover-up

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

What do you get when you take Canada's favourite drive-through treat, a bit of material and a desire to help the environment?

For Waterdown's Dan Dexel, it was that "aha" moment when a great idea is formed, and faster than you could say "double-double," Coffee Covers was born.

Dexel, who along with two partners runs a company that designs neoprene covers for propane tanks and water jugs, recalled thinking that there must be another use for the insulating fabric most commonly used for wetsuits. Then he thought about the coffee shop tradition of "double-cupping" to protect tender fingers from steaming paper cups.

"We had just got a shipment in, and we were excited," he said. "We started brainstorming, and I thought, 'Why not coffee?'"

Dexel started drawing up prototypes, and developed covers to fit medium, large and extra-large take-out cups. Neoprene is not just thin (1.5 mm thick) and durable, it provides a comfortable grip, and keeps the coffee - or tea, if you prefer - from cooling.

"I ran tests in five-degree weather, and the one with the coffee cover keeps the coffee warmer," he noted.

The covers are also washable and, of course, reuseable, noted Dexel, meaning all those extra cups stay out of the landfill. When not in use, the covers fold up neatly to fit into a pocket, purse, or glove box.

Dexel approached the City of Hamilton with the concept, and came away with an order for 500 covers in distinctive royal blue bearing the Waste Watch program logo. For now, the covers will just be distributed to employees, while staff gauges response to the product.

Coffee Covers is still in its infancy, and Dexel plans to approach local businesses that may be interested in ordering covers printed with their logos. He's also come up with several designs with catchy sayings such as "Hockey Mom" and "World's Greatest Dad" - and in different colours - that he hopes can be sold at gas station and convenience store counters.

Dexel applied for patent protection on Coffee Covers last year. The ultimate goal, he noted, would be to land a contract with a major coffee chain but he admits that's something his company needs to grow into. In the meantime, he's encouraged by the feedback he's had so far. "People have started seeing them, and asking about them," he said.

For more information, visit www.coffeecovers.com or e-mail Dexel at info@coffeecovers.com. He can also be reached at 905-320-6203.