Committee green lights road plan

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

By a narrow vote of 3-2, Hamilton's public works, infrastructure and environment committee gave the go-ahead Monday for two controversial roadways that will handle increased traffic resulting from proposed residential growth in Waterdown.

The new north-south and east-west road proposals, estimated to cost $52 million, will now enter the design stage, or Phase 3, of the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan Study.

The majority of citizens addressing the committee, held in the Bohemian Banquet Centre and attended by about 150 area residents, asked that the planning process be delayed to provide time for more consultation and consideration of other road options. Flamborough councillor Margaret McCarthy, who chairs the committee, spoke in favour of proceeding with the transportation plan. Her counterpart in rural Flamborough, Dave Braden, tried unsuccessfully to convince fellow committee members that referral would be better, in order "to try one last time to build a balanced community" rather than make Waterdown into what he described as "a withdrawn suburban (or bedroom) community" for people who live in Waterdown but work in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

After almost three hours of discussion, including about a dozen citizen delegations, presentations by city staff and consultants and debate around the committee table, Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla presented a motion to approve the staff report endorsing Phase 2 of the transportation study. Councillor Chad Collins seconded the motion, which was also supported by Councillor Tom Jackson. Stoney Creek councillor Phil Bruckler joined Councillor Braden in opposing the motion.

The committee's decision still requires approval by Hamilton city council on March 1 before the transportation study can move beyond Phase 2.

Citizens who had hoped to persuade the committee to delay a decision and open up the consultative process with additional public

"If we blink, we will end up getting development without developers having to pay for those roads," she said at the committee meeting. Given the controversial nature of the project, McCarthy added, "It would be easy for me to duck for cover, but irresponsible of me to do such a thing."

The transportation study is a joint project of the cities of Hamilton and Burlington and the Region of Halton. The new east-west and north-south roads are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the addition of 6,500 homes in north and southeast Waterdown over the next 10 years.

The proposed east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6 north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue and jogging south along the eastern edge of Upcountry Estates and eventually meeting Dundas Street East (Hwy. 5).

The north-south route calls for the widening of Waterdown Road to four lanes from Hwy. 403 to Mountain Brow Road, which will also be widened to four lanes before the new road turns northward to Dundas Street East through a proposed new Waterdown South subdivision.

Flanders Drive resident Roberta Bielak, a member of the Waterdown South Residents' Association, urged the project team to take a more cohesive, holistic approach in its transportation studies.

"Don't make our village into a bedroom community," she pleaded. "That's not what we are."

Another Flanders Drive resident, Leslie MacMillan, urged the committee to adopt the staff report. "It's difficult to plan transportation in a large limestone cliff that curves around a lake," he said while applauding the project team for "getting it right."

Burlington residents living on or near Waterdown Road and represented by Julie Martin of the Waterdown Road Area Residents' Association, reacted much differently. She argued that the recommendation to widen Waterdown Road ignores the findings of the North Aldershot Inter-Agency Review (NAIAR) report, which she described as "the backbone for the City of Burlington's Official Plan."

The report states, "Because it is an essential part of the character of North Aldershot and because it is an important element in defining the separation of existing urban areas, Waterdown Road must not be widened."

Martin also noted that a 1999 transportation report by Stantec Engineering recommended the widening of King Road rather than Waterdown Road and described the proposal as a more cost-effective option.

Discussion during the course of the meeting also included whether development charges collected from Waterdown developers can be used to finance road improvements in another municipality, as most of Waterdown Road lies in Burlington.

Mary Lou Tanner, manager of strategic and environmental planning with Hamilton's public works department, surprised many by saying that the Development Charges Act does allow one municipality to collect development charges that will finance improvements in another.

She added that Hamilton is currently working on a cost-sharing agreement with Burlington and Halton to cover the construction costs of the roads. Most new construction will be funded by growth through development fees although about five per cent will be paid by the municipalities involved.

Committee green lights road plan

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

By a narrow vote of 3-2, Hamilton's public works, infrastructure and environment committee gave the go-ahead Monday for two controversial roadways that will handle increased traffic resulting from proposed residential growth in Waterdown.

The new north-south and east-west road proposals, estimated to cost $52 million, will now enter the design stage, or Phase 3, of the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan Study.

The majority of citizens addressing the committee, held in the Bohemian Banquet Centre and attended by about 150 area residents, asked that the planning process be delayed to provide time for more consultation and consideration of other road options. Flamborough councillor Margaret McCarthy, who chairs the committee, spoke in favour of proceeding with the transportation plan. Her counterpart in rural Flamborough, Dave Braden, tried unsuccessfully to convince fellow committee members that referral would be better, in order "to try one last time to build a balanced community" rather than make Waterdown into what he described as "a withdrawn suburban (or bedroom) community" for people who live in Waterdown but work in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

After almost three hours of discussion, including about a dozen citizen delegations, presentations by city staff and consultants and debate around the committee table, Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla presented a motion to approve the staff report endorsing Phase 2 of the transportation study. Councillor Chad Collins seconded the motion, which was also supported by Councillor Tom Jackson. Stoney Creek councillor Phil Bruckler joined Councillor Braden in opposing the motion.

The committee's decision still requires approval by Hamilton city council on March 1 before the transportation study can move beyond Phase 2.

Citizens who had hoped to persuade the committee to delay a decision and open up the consultative process with additional public

"If we blink, we will end up getting development without developers having to pay for those roads," she said at the committee meeting. Given the controversial nature of the project, McCarthy added, "It would be easy for me to duck for cover, but irresponsible of me to do such a thing."

The transportation study is a joint project of the cities of Hamilton and Burlington and the Region of Halton. The new east-west and north-south roads are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the addition of 6,500 homes in north and southeast Waterdown over the next 10 years.

The proposed east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6 north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue and jogging south along the eastern edge of Upcountry Estates and eventually meeting Dundas Street East (Hwy. 5).

The north-south route calls for the widening of Waterdown Road to four lanes from Hwy. 403 to Mountain Brow Road, which will also be widened to four lanes before the new road turns northward to Dundas Street East through a proposed new Waterdown South subdivision.

Flanders Drive resident Roberta Bielak, a member of the Waterdown South Residents' Association, urged the project team to take a more cohesive, holistic approach in its transportation studies.

"Don't make our village into a bedroom community," she pleaded. "That's not what we are."

Another Flanders Drive resident, Leslie MacMillan, urged the committee to adopt the staff report. "It's difficult to plan transportation in a large limestone cliff that curves around a lake," he said while applauding the project team for "getting it right."

Burlington residents living on or near Waterdown Road and represented by Julie Martin of the Waterdown Road Area Residents' Association, reacted much differently. She argued that the recommendation to widen Waterdown Road ignores the findings of the North Aldershot Inter-Agency Review (NAIAR) report, which she described as "the backbone for the City of Burlington's Official Plan."

The report states, "Because it is an essential part of the character of North Aldershot and because it is an important element in defining the separation of existing urban areas, Waterdown Road must not be widened."

Martin also noted that a 1999 transportation report by Stantec Engineering recommended the widening of King Road rather than Waterdown Road and described the proposal as a more cost-effective option.

Discussion during the course of the meeting also included whether development charges collected from Waterdown developers can be used to finance road improvements in another municipality, as most of Waterdown Road lies in Burlington.

Mary Lou Tanner, manager of strategic and environmental planning with Hamilton's public works department, surprised many by saying that the Development Charges Act does allow one municipality to collect development charges that will finance improvements in another.

She added that Hamilton is currently working on a cost-sharing agreement with Burlington and Halton to cover the construction costs of the roads. Most new construction will be funded by growth through development fees although about five per cent will be paid by the municipalities involved.

Committee green lights road plan

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

By a narrow vote of 3-2, Hamilton's public works, infrastructure and environment committee gave the go-ahead Monday for two controversial roadways that will handle increased traffic resulting from proposed residential growth in Waterdown.

The new north-south and east-west road proposals, estimated to cost $52 million, will now enter the design stage, or Phase 3, of the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan Study.

The majority of citizens addressing the committee, held in the Bohemian Banquet Centre and attended by about 150 area residents, asked that the planning process be delayed to provide time for more consultation and consideration of other road options. Flamborough councillor Margaret McCarthy, who chairs the committee, spoke in favour of proceeding with the transportation plan. Her counterpart in rural Flamborough, Dave Braden, tried unsuccessfully to convince fellow committee members that referral would be better, in order "to try one last time to build a balanced community" rather than make Waterdown into what he described as "a withdrawn suburban (or bedroom) community" for people who live in Waterdown but work in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

After almost three hours of discussion, including about a dozen citizen delegations, presentations by city staff and consultants and debate around the committee table, Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla presented a motion to approve the staff report endorsing Phase 2 of the transportation study. Councillor Chad Collins seconded the motion, which was also supported by Councillor Tom Jackson. Stoney Creek councillor Phil Bruckler joined Councillor Braden in opposing the motion.

The committee's decision still requires approval by Hamilton city council on March 1 before the transportation study can move beyond Phase 2.

Citizens who had hoped to persuade the committee to delay a decision and open up the consultative process with additional public

"If we blink, we will end up getting development without developers having to pay for those roads," she said at the committee meeting. Given the controversial nature of the project, McCarthy added, "It would be easy for me to duck for cover, but irresponsible of me to do such a thing."

The transportation study is a joint project of the cities of Hamilton and Burlington and the Region of Halton. The new east-west and north-south roads are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the addition of 6,500 homes in north and southeast Waterdown over the next 10 years.

The proposed east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6 north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue and jogging south along the eastern edge of Upcountry Estates and eventually meeting Dundas Street East (Hwy. 5).

The north-south route calls for the widening of Waterdown Road to four lanes from Hwy. 403 to Mountain Brow Road, which will also be widened to four lanes before the new road turns northward to Dundas Street East through a proposed new Waterdown South subdivision.

Flanders Drive resident Roberta Bielak, a member of the Waterdown South Residents' Association, urged the project team to take a more cohesive, holistic approach in its transportation studies.

"Don't make our village into a bedroom community," she pleaded. "That's not what we are."

Another Flanders Drive resident, Leslie MacMillan, urged the committee to adopt the staff report. "It's difficult to plan transportation in a large limestone cliff that curves around a lake," he said while applauding the project team for "getting it right."

Burlington residents living on or near Waterdown Road and represented by Julie Martin of the Waterdown Road Area Residents' Association, reacted much differently. She argued that the recommendation to widen Waterdown Road ignores the findings of the North Aldershot Inter-Agency Review (NAIAR) report, which she described as "the backbone for the City of Burlington's Official Plan."

The report states, "Because it is an essential part of the character of North Aldershot and because it is an important element in defining the separation of existing urban areas, Waterdown Road must not be widened."

Martin also noted that a 1999 transportation report by Stantec Engineering recommended the widening of King Road rather than Waterdown Road and described the proposal as a more cost-effective option.

Discussion during the course of the meeting also included whether development charges collected from Waterdown developers can be used to finance road improvements in another municipality, as most of Waterdown Road lies in Burlington.

Mary Lou Tanner, manager of strategic and environmental planning with Hamilton's public works department, surprised many by saying that the Development Charges Act does allow one municipality to collect development charges that will finance improvements in another.

She added that Hamilton is currently working on a cost-sharing agreement with Burlington and Halton to cover the construction costs of the roads. Most new construction will be funded by growth through development fees although about five per cent will be paid by the municipalities involved.