Hunter in the limelight

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You can take the girl out of the country, but you'll never take the country out of the girl.

And that's just fine with Nancy Hunter, a west Flamborough native who now pursues a fine art career based out of Toronto. Her work, she admits, is based on her history - and frequent return visits - on the family's 4th Concession farm.

"I get my inspiration from nature, and I try to get that surface on my paintings," she said during a recent tour of her current installation at the Carnegie Gallery in Dundas. "I go for lots of walks out in the bush on the farm, with my family and my dog."

The exhibit, which runs until this Sunday (February 26), features a number of two-dimensional pieces ranging in size, as well as some new, mixed media works, such as shadow boxes and a light table, which incorporate found objects into the art.

Hunter's technique - mounting gold, silver and bronze foil onto mylar, then adding colour with oil sticks - create an earthy, yet ethereal quality. Her larger pieces, with titles like "Boulevards," "Passages" and "Merge" provide abstract aerial views of rural fields and various landscapes. With "Terra Firma" and "Faultline" she achieves an organic, underground feel.

Hunter points out that her work used to be less abstract. But after graduating from the Ontario College of Art and heading off to complete a studio program in New York, she was exposed to contemporary art. The former Ryerson fashion design student also changed her career path, finding her calling in fine arts.

Hunter has been a featured artist at a number of exhibitions in the Golden Horseshoe, mainly in Toronto and Hamilton. Her work has been recognized with a number of awards, including Jurors' Awards from Arts Hamilton (1991, 1993) and the Viola Depew Award from the Women's Art Association of Hamilton. Hunter also received an Exhibition Grant from the Ontario Arts Council.

But she's always happy to come home. With roots at Parkside High School, the Dundas Valley School of Art, the Carnegie (her work has long been available there), and the Art Gallery of Hamilton, where her pieces are included in the art rental program, she has plenty of local support. And, of course, her family members are not only her biggest fans, but they have plenty of practical input, too.

"For the light table, my dad chopped down the tree, and my nephews TJ and Matthew helped wire it," she laughed. "And my sister helped me hang the installation. My family has been very supportive."

Hunter's work has been featured at the Carnegie Gallery (10 King. St. West, Dundas) through February, and will still be available for viewing this weekend. The gallery is open Saturday, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Online, visit at www.carnegiegallery.org and click on "Exhibitions and Events."

Hunter in the limelight

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You can take the girl out of the country, but you'll never take the country out of the girl.

And that's just fine with Nancy Hunter, a west Flamborough native who now pursues a fine art career based out of Toronto. Her work, she admits, is based on her history - and frequent return visits - on the family's 4th Concession farm.

"I get my inspiration from nature, and I try to get that surface on my paintings," she said during a recent tour of her current installation at the Carnegie Gallery in Dundas. "I go for lots of walks out in the bush on the farm, with my family and my dog."

The exhibit, which runs until this Sunday (February 26), features a number of two-dimensional pieces ranging in size, as well as some new, mixed media works, such as shadow boxes and a light table, which incorporate found objects into the art.

Hunter's technique - mounting gold, silver and bronze foil onto mylar, then adding colour with oil sticks - create an earthy, yet ethereal quality. Her larger pieces, with titles like "Boulevards," "Passages" and "Merge" provide abstract aerial views of rural fields and various landscapes. With "Terra Firma" and "Faultline" she achieves an organic, underground feel.

Hunter points out that her work used to be less abstract. But after graduating from the Ontario College of Art and heading off to complete a studio program in New York, she was exposed to contemporary art. The former Ryerson fashion design student also changed her career path, finding her calling in fine arts.

Hunter has been a featured artist at a number of exhibitions in the Golden Horseshoe, mainly in Toronto and Hamilton. Her work has been recognized with a number of awards, including Jurors' Awards from Arts Hamilton (1991, 1993) and the Viola Depew Award from the Women's Art Association of Hamilton. Hunter also received an Exhibition Grant from the Ontario Arts Council.

But she's always happy to come home. With roots at Parkside High School, the Dundas Valley School of Art, the Carnegie (her work has long been available there), and the Art Gallery of Hamilton, where her pieces are included in the art rental program, she has plenty of local support. And, of course, her family members are not only her biggest fans, but they have plenty of practical input, too.

"For the light table, my dad chopped down the tree, and my nephews TJ and Matthew helped wire it," she laughed. "And my sister helped me hang the installation. My family has been very supportive."

Hunter's work has been featured at the Carnegie Gallery (10 King. St. West, Dundas) through February, and will still be available for viewing this weekend. The gallery is open Saturday, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Online, visit at www.carnegiegallery.org and click on "Exhibitions and Events."

Hunter in the limelight

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

You can take the girl out of the country, but you'll never take the country out of the girl.

And that's just fine with Nancy Hunter, a west Flamborough native who now pursues a fine art career based out of Toronto. Her work, she admits, is based on her history - and frequent return visits - on the family's 4th Concession farm.

"I get my inspiration from nature, and I try to get that surface on my paintings," she said during a recent tour of her current installation at the Carnegie Gallery in Dundas. "I go for lots of walks out in the bush on the farm, with my family and my dog."

The exhibit, which runs until this Sunday (February 26), features a number of two-dimensional pieces ranging in size, as well as some new, mixed media works, such as shadow boxes and a light table, which incorporate found objects into the art.

Hunter's technique - mounting gold, silver and bronze foil onto mylar, then adding colour with oil sticks - create an earthy, yet ethereal quality. Her larger pieces, with titles like "Boulevards," "Passages" and "Merge" provide abstract aerial views of rural fields and various landscapes. With "Terra Firma" and "Faultline" she achieves an organic, underground feel.

Hunter points out that her work used to be less abstract. But after graduating from the Ontario College of Art and heading off to complete a studio program in New York, she was exposed to contemporary art. The former Ryerson fashion design student also changed her career path, finding her calling in fine arts.

Hunter has been a featured artist at a number of exhibitions in the Golden Horseshoe, mainly in Toronto and Hamilton. Her work has been recognized with a number of awards, including Jurors' Awards from Arts Hamilton (1991, 1993) and the Viola Depew Award from the Women's Art Association of Hamilton. Hunter also received an Exhibition Grant from the Ontario Arts Council.

But she's always happy to come home. With roots at Parkside High School, the Dundas Valley School of Art, the Carnegie (her work has long been available there), and the Art Gallery of Hamilton, where her pieces are included in the art rental program, she has plenty of local support. And, of course, her family members are not only her biggest fans, but they have plenty of practical input, too.

"For the light table, my dad chopped down the tree, and my nephews TJ and Matthew helped wire it," she laughed. "And my sister helped me hang the installation. My family has been very supportive."

Hunter's work has been featured at the Carnegie Gallery (10 King. St. West, Dundas) through February, and will still be available for viewing this weekend. The gallery is open Saturday, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Online, visit at www.carnegiegallery.org and click on "Exhibitions and Events."