Kids playing with lighter start blaze in Freelton

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A mother with three young children was forced to flee their North Street apartment in Freelton on Sunday morning after a blaze broke out in the unit.

The woman was wakened by two of the children, who ran to tell her that they had been playing with a lighter and had set fire to items in their closet.

"She fled with her three kids and the dog," noted Const. Rick Mowers as firefighters worked to clear debris from the apartment. "There was a cat, but it died in the fire."

According to Hamilton Fire Service Fire Safety Officer John Verbeek, crews were dispatched to the site just after 9 a.m. In total, 10 pieces of apparatus and 37 firefighters, including units from Freelton, downtown Hamilton and Waterdown, were required to extinguish the fire and clean up after the blaze. They were on the scene for almost three hours.

Damage, added Verbeek, is estimated at $70,000 to the building and $10,000 to the contents of the apartment. The North Street structure, just off Freelton Road, also houses two other apartment units, one of which is unoccupied.

"There may be smoke damage to the other unit, but the damage was mostly contained to unit two," noted Mowers.

Verbeek pointed out that while recent amendments to the Ontario Fire Code requiring a working smoke alarm on every level of the home apply to single family, semi-detached and town homes, there are very specific requirements in the Code dealing with multiple family dwellings. Depending on the layout of the building, the owner must ensure that the appropriate number of alarms - either electric or battery operated - are properly located within each unit. The Code also requires that electric smoke alarms are installed in any common areas of the building.

Verbeek noted that the fire report didn't indicate whether there were working alarms at the Freelton Road address at the time of the fire. A fire prevention officer will carry out an inspection at the site, to assess compliance with the Fire Code.

Kids playing with lighter start blaze in Freelton

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A mother with three young children was forced to flee their North Street apartment in Freelton on Sunday morning after a blaze broke out in the unit.

The woman was wakened by two of the children, who ran to tell her that they had been playing with a lighter and had set fire to items in their closet.

"She fled with her three kids and the dog," noted Const. Rick Mowers as firefighters worked to clear debris from the apartment. "There was a cat, but it died in the fire."

According to Hamilton Fire Service Fire Safety Officer John Verbeek, crews were dispatched to the site just after 9 a.m. In total, 10 pieces of apparatus and 37 firefighters, including units from Freelton, downtown Hamilton and Waterdown, were required to extinguish the fire and clean up after the blaze. They were on the scene for almost three hours.

Damage, added Verbeek, is estimated at $70,000 to the building and $10,000 to the contents of the apartment. The North Street structure, just off Freelton Road, also houses two other apartment units, one of which is unoccupied.

"There may be smoke damage to the other unit, but the damage was mostly contained to unit two," noted Mowers.

Verbeek pointed out that while recent amendments to the Ontario Fire Code requiring a working smoke alarm on every level of the home apply to single family, semi-detached and town homes, there are very specific requirements in the Code dealing with multiple family dwellings. Depending on the layout of the building, the owner must ensure that the appropriate number of alarms - either electric or battery operated - are properly located within each unit. The Code also requires that electric smoke alarms are installed in any common areas of the building.

Verbeek noted that the fire report didn't indicate whether there were working alarms at the Freelton Road address at the time of the fire. A fire prevention officer will carry out an inspection at the site, to assess compliance with the Fire Code.

Kids playing with lighter start blaze in Freelton

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

A mother with three young children was forced to flee their North Street apartment in Freelton on Sunday morning after a blaze broke out in the unit.

The woman was wakened by two of the children, who ran to tell her that they had been playing with a lighter and had set fire to items in their closet.

"She fled with her three kids and the dog," noted Const. Rick Mowers as firefighters worked to clear debris from the apartment. "There was a cat, but it died in the fire."

According to Hamilton Fire Service Fire Safety Officer John Verbeek, crews were dispatched to the site just after 9 a.m. In total, 10 pieces of apparatus and 37 firefighters, including units from Freelton, downtown Hamilton and Waterdown, were required to extinguish the fire and clean up after the blaze. They were on the scene for almost three hours.

Damage, added Verbeek, is estimated at $70,000 to the building and $10,000 to the contents of the apartment. The North Street structure, just off Freelton Road, also houses two other apartment units, one of which is unoccupied.

"There may be smoke damage to the other unit, but the damage was mostly contained to unit two," noted Mowers.

Verbeek pointed out that while recent amendments to the Ontario Fire Code requiring a working smoke alarm on every level of the home apply to single family, semi-detached and town homes, there are very specific requirements in the Code dealing with multiple family dwellings. Depending on the layout of the building, the owner must ensure that the appropriate number of alarms - either electric or battery operated - are properly located within each unit. The Code also requires that electric smoke alarms are installed in any common areas of the building.

Verbeek noted that the fire report didn't indicate whether there were working alarms at the Freelton Road address at the time of the fire. A fire prevention officer will carry out an inspection at the site, to assess compliance with the Fire Code.