Check in to Village Theatre's Suburban Motel

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It may not be feel good theatre, but anyone who enjoys dark humour and sharp wit should check in to Village Theatre's latest offering.

Suburban Motel is an award-winning sextet of one-act plays, each set in the same grimy hotel room. It was written by Canadian playwright George F. Walker, who's best known as co-author of the CBC hit series This is Wonderland, as well as his work as creative consultant on Due South and The Newsroom.

Each play follows the trials of a small cast of lovable misfits, as they try in vain to navigate their way out of difficult circumstances. But for all their efforts, they scheme themselves deeper into trouble, as their deals and plans go horribly awry, with sad, but hilarious results.

It's a grimly humorous and voyeuristic look at the alienation and injustice experienced by the lower classes.

Village theatre chose to show Problem Child and Adult Entertainment for its Suburban Motel selection.

Peter Feldman designed the appropriately dreary set, as well as directing Problem Child. The dingy walls and tacky decor are a fitting backdrop to the dismal lives of the characters, while its simplicity lets the play's high tension, witty dialogue and dark humour take centre stage.

In Problem Child, we meet Denise, an ex-using hooker, and her partner RJ, an ex-con, who are trying to get their baby daughter back from child services, while Adult Entertainment unearths the dirty secrets of two cops done bad, and the women who love them.

The highlights of the evening were Village Theatre veterans, Kerry Corrigan, who plays the up-tight, by-the-book social worker, Helen in Problem Child, and Ralph Woodcock, who played drunken hotelier Philly, also in Problem Child. Both milked Walker's words for every last drop of comic effect, while still exploring the deeper issues of social justice and class struggles.

All of the actors conveyed the end-of -the-rope tension that permeates the play effectively, but never missed a laugh from the play's dark and biting humour. Although each play is just an hour,and the plot twists can verge on the absurd, the actors connected to the audience emotionally, and this this reviewer wanting to know what happened to these troubled people after the curtain fell.

Mike Rae's lighting design was understated but dramatic, never taking away from the unfolding drama. The only technical hitch was a cell phone, which sounded more like running water. But these are the quirks which make theatre the intimate experience it is.

Suburban Motel run s February 23-25 and March 2-4. at Waterdown's Memorial Hall. The curtain rises at 8 p.m.

Check in to Village Theatre's Suburban Motel

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It may not be feel good theatre, but anyone who enjoys dark humour and sharp wit should check in to Village Theatre's latest offering.

Suburban Motel is an award-winning sextet of one-act plays, each set in the same grimy hotel room. It was written by Canadian playwright George F. Walker, who's best known as co-author of the CBC hit series This is Wonderland, as well as his work as creative consultant on Due South and The Newsroom.

Each play follows the trials of a small cast of lovable misfits, as they try in vain to navigate their way out of difficult circumstances. But for all their efforts, they scheme themselves deeper into trouble, as their deals and plans go horribly awry, with sad, but hilarious results.

It's a grimly humorous and voyeuristic look at the alienation and injustice experienced by the lower classes.

Village theatre chose to show Problem Child and Adult Entertainment for its Suburban Motel selection.

Peter Feldman designed the appropriately dreary set, as well as directing Problem Child. The dingy walls and tacky decor are a fitting backdrop to the dismal lives of the characters, while its simplicity lets the play's high tension, witty dialogue and dark humour take centre stage.

In Problem Child, we meet Denise, an ex-using hooker, and her partner RJ, an ex-con, who are trying to get their baby daughter back from child services, while Adult Entertainment unearths the dirty secrets of two cops done bad, and the women who love them.

The highlights of the evening were Village Theatre veterans, Kerry Corrigan, who plays the up-tight, by-the-book social worker, Helen in Problem Child, and Ralph Woodcock, who played drunken hotelier Philly, also in Problem Child. Both milked Walker's words for every last drop of comic effect, while still exploring the deeper issues of social justice and class struggles.

All of the actors conveyed the end-of -the-rope tension that permeates the play effectively, but never missed a laugh from the play's dark and biting humour. Although each play is just an hour,and the plot twists can verge on the absurd, the actors connected to the audience emotionally, and this this reviewer wanting to know what happened to these troubled people after the curtain fell.

Mike Rae's lighting design was understated but dramatic, never taking away from the unfolding drama. The only technical hitch was a cell phone, which sounded more like running water. But these are the quirks which make theatre the intimate experience it is.

Suburban Motel run s February 23-25 and March 2-4. at Waterdown's Memorial Hall. The curtain rises at 8 p.m.

Check in to Village Theatre's Suburban Motel

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It may not be feel good theatre, but anyone who enjoys dark humour and sharp wit should check in to Village Theatre's latest offering.

Suburban Motel is an award-winning sextet of one-act plays, each set in the same grimy hotel room. It was written by Canadian playwright George F. Walker, who's best known as co-author of the CBC hit series This is Wonderland, as well as his work as creative consultant on Due South and The Newsroom.

Each play follows the trials of a small cast of lovable misfits, as they try in vain to navigate their way out of difficult circumstances. But for all their efforts, they scheme themselves deeper into trouble, as their deals and plans go horribly awry, with sad, but hilarious results.

It's a grimly humorous and voyeuristic look at the alienation and injustice experienced by the lower classes.

Village theatre chose to show Problem Child and Adult Entertainment for its Suburban Motel selection.

Peter Feldman designed the appropriately dreary set, as well as directing Problem Child. The dingy walls and tacky decor are a fitting backdrop to the dismal lives of the characters, while its simplicity lets the play's high tension, witty dialogue and dark humour take centre stage.

In Problem Child, we meet Denise, an ex-using hooker, and her partner RJ, an ex-con, who are trying to get their baby daughter back from child services, while Adult Entertainment unearths the dirty secrets of two cops done bad, and the women who love them.

The highlights of the evening were Village Theatre veterans, Kerry Corrigan, who plays the up-tight, by-the-book social worker, Helen in Problem Child, and Ralph Woodcock, who played drunken hotelier Philly, also in Problem Child. Both milked Walker's words for every last drop of comic effect, while still exploring the deeper issues of social justice and class struggles.

All of the actors conveyed the end-of -the-rope tension that permeates the play effectively, but never missed a laugh from the play's dark and biting humour. Although each play is just an hour,and the plot twists can verge on the absurd, the actors connected to the audience emotionally, and this this reviewer wanting to know what happened to these troubled people after the curtain fell.

Mike Rae's lighting design was understated but dramatic, never taking away from the unfolding drama. The only technical hitch was a cell phone, which sounded more like running water. But these are the quirks which make theatre the intimate experience it is.

Suburban Motel run s February 23-25 and March 2-4. at Waterdown's Memorial Hall. The curtain rises at 8 p.m.