Flamborough lawyer adopts lifestyle of world globetrotter

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

After several years in private practice, Flamborough lawyer Bill Kosar decided it was time for a change of pace.

A couple of years ago, he became a self-employed international legal consultant, a profession which demands a lot of travel and knowledge of the international corporate world.

Kosar's work entails helping post-conflict countries get back on track by ensuring rules of law, the principle that every member of society, even a ruler, must follow. Last year, he visited 12 different countries, including Bosnia and South Vietnam.

His was hired by the United Nations Development Agency to help draft a new enterprise law for South Vietnam. While there, he also presented the results of his report to about 150 high level Vietnamese government officials.

Because his work is interesting and brings him to many far-off corners of the world, Kosar was invited to share some of his globetrotting experiences with members of the Flamborough AM Rotary Club last week. He brought along a slide presentation and spoke extensively about his trip to South Vietnam in December 2004 and January 2005. Most of his talk focused on his impressions of the country gained through his encounters with the Vietnamese people, their age-old cities and their culture.

He told the Rotarians that Hanoi, with its five million people, is "a bustling city" and also, "a place of contrasts," featuring both traditional and contemporary architecture. He described the traffic as "hundreds of scooters massing at intersections" and told his amused audience that he discovered the best way for a pedestrian to cross the busy streets is "to walk straight ahead without looking, and without any erratic movements. Otherwise, you'll get hit."

Noting that there are 15 deaths a day because of scooter accidents, he said, "Stoplights are mere suggestions, rather than a hard, fast rule."

The climate in South Vietnam is often oppressively hot for visitors. Kosar's visit was during a cooler time of the year, when temperatures hovered around 24 to 25 degrees Celsius. When the temperature dipped to about 22 degrees Celsius, he noticed that the Vietnamese were wearing mittens and scarves. "I was in a golf shirt and shorts," he said.

Silk prices in Vietnam are very reasonable and Kosar bought himself a couple of silk ties and a kimono during his stay.

Vietnamese cuisine was also much appreciated by Kosar. During his six weeks in the country, he ate lunch and dinner at a five-star restaurant every day. A full-course dinner with wine cost less than $10 US, he said.

Kosar was adventurous and although he didn't try the local delicacy, dog meat, he did eat some turtle--"it was dark meat and tasted like beef." He was also given a concoction of turtle blood and vodka to drink and was also treated to a bright green drink that he later learned was "eviscerated turtle guts and vodka." He downed both.

One of the cultural highlights of his visit was a water puppet theatre presentation called "Dance of the Water Fairies." The performers, who guided the puppets over the water's surface, wore hip waders, Kosar said. Water puppetry dates back to 1,000 years when the farmers in the rice paddies entertained themselves and others with such shows, he explained.

During a question and answer period following his talk, Kosar noted that the economy in South Vietnam is experiencing "tremendous growth" of about nine per cent annually. Also, "the country is Communist in name only; the economy is definitely capitalist," he said.

While acknowledging that the local populace most likely thought that he was an American, Kosar said he didn't experience any resentment from the people. He never felt unsafe during his visit.

Having an international business career means there are many opportunities to experience different cultures, Kosar told the Rotarians.

It's a part of his job that he thoroughly enjoys. Plans are in the works for a visit to Darfur in east central Africa and possibly, Baghdad, Iraq.

At times it seems that Kosar barely has time to unpack his suitcases between missions.

Flamborough lawyer adopts lifestyle of world globetrotter

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

After several years in private practice, Flamborough lawyer Bill Kosar decided it was time for a change of pace.

A couple of years ago, he became a self-employed international legal consultant, a profession which demands a lot of travel and knowledge of the international corporate world.

Kosar's work entails helping post-conflict countries get back on track by ensuring rules of law, the principle that every member of society, even a ruler, must follow. Last year, he visited 12 different countries, including Bosnia and South Vietnam.

His was hired by the United Nations Development Agency to help draft a new enterprise law for South Vietnam. While there, he also presented the results of his report to about 150 high level Vietnamese government officials.

Because his work is interesting and brings him to many far-off corners of the world, Kosar was invited to share some of his globetrotting experiences with members of the Flamborough AM Rotary Club last week. He brought along a slide presentation and spoke extensively about his trip to South Vietnam in December 2004 and January 2005. Most of his talk focused on his impressions of the country gained through his encounters with the Vietnamese people, their age-old cities and their culture.

He told the Rotarians that Hanoi, with its five million people, is "a bustling city" and also, "a place of contrasts," featuring both traditional and contemporary architecture. He described the traffic as "hundreds of scooters massing at intersections" and told his amused audience that he discovered the best way for a pedestrian to cross the busy streets is "to walk straight ahead without looking, and without any erratic movements. Otherwise, you'll get hit."

Noting that there are 15 deaths a day because of scooter accidents, he said, "Stoplights are mere suggestions, rather than a hard, fast rule."

The climate in South Vietnam is often oppressively hot for visitors. Kosar's visit was during a cooler time of the year, when temperatures hovered around 24 to 25 degrees Celsius. When the temperature dipped to about 22 degrees Celsius, he noticed that the Vietnamese were wearing mittens and scarves. "I was in a golf shirt and shorts," he said.

Silk prices in Vietnam are very reasonable and Kosar bought himself a couple of silk ties and a kimono during his stay.

Vietnamese cuisine was also much appreciated by Kosar. During his six weeks in the country, he ate lunch and dinner at a five-star restaurant every day. A full-course dinner with wine cost less than $10 US, he said.

Kosar was adventurous and although he didn't try the local delicacy, dog meat, he did eat some turtle--"it was dark meat and tasted like beef." He was also given a concoction of turtle blood and vodka to drink and was also treated to a bright green drink that he later learned was "eviscerated turtle guts and vodka." He downed both.

One of the cultural highlights of his visit was a water puppet theatre presentation called "Dance of the Water Fairies." The performers, who guided the puppets over the water's surface, wore hip waders, Kosar said. Water puppetry dates back to 1,000 years when the farmers in the rice paddies entertained themselves and others with such shows, he explained.

During a question and answer period following his talk, Kosar noted that the economy in South Vietnam is experiencing "tremendous growth" of about nine per cent annually. Also, "the country is Communist in name only; the economy is definitely capitalist," he said.

While acknowledging that the local populace most likely thought that he was an American, Kosar said he didn't experience any resentment from the people. He never felt unsafe during his visit.

Having an international business career means there are many opportunities to experience different cultures, Kosar told the Rotarians.

It's a part of his job that he thoroughly enjoys. Plans are in the works for a visit to Darfur in east central Africa and possibly, Baghdad, Iraq.

At times it seems that Kosar barely has time to unpack his suitcases between missions.

Flamborough lawyer adopts lifestyle of world globetrotter

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

After several years in private practice, Flamborough lawyer Bill Kosar decided it was time for a change of pace.

A couple of years ago, he became a self-employed international legal consultant, a profession which demands a lot of travel and knowledge of the international corporate world.

Kosar's work entails helping post-conflict countries get back on track by ensuring rules of law, the principle that every member of society, even a ruler, must follow. Last year, he visited 12 different countries, including Bosnia and South Vietnam.

His was hired by the United Nations Development Agency to help draft a new enterprise law for South Vietnam. While there, he also presented the results of his report to about 150 high level Vietnamese government officials.

Because his work is interesting and brings him to many far-off corners of the world, Kosar was invited to share some of his globetrotting experiences with members of the Flamborough AM Rotary Club last week. He brought along a slide presentation and spoke extensively about his trip to South Vietnam in December 2004 and January 2005. Most of his talk focused on his impressions of the country gained through his encounters with the Vietnamese people, their age-old cities and their culture.

He told the Rotarians that Hanoi, with its five million people, is "a bustling city" and also, "a place of contrasts," featuring both traditional and contemporary architecture. He described the traffic as "hundreds of scooters massing at intersections" and told his amused audience that he discovered the best way for a pedestrian to cross the busy streets is "to walk straight ahead without looking, and without any erratic movements. Otherwise, you'll get hit."

Noting that there are 15 deaths a day because of scooter accidents, he said, "Stoplights are mere suggestions, rather than a hard, fast rule."

The climate in South Vietnam is often oppressively hot for visitors. Kosar's visit was during a cooler time of the year, when temperatures hovered around 24 to 25 degrees Celsius. When the temperature dipped to about 22 degrees Celsius, he noticed that the Vietnamese were wearing mittens and scarves. "I was in a golf shirt and shorts," he said.

Silk prices in Vietnam are very reasonable and Kosar bought himself a couple of silk ties and a kimono during his stay.

Vietnamese cuisine was also much appreciated by Kosar. During his six weeks in the country, he ate lunch and dinner at a five-star restaurant every day. A full-course dinner with wine cost less than $10 US, he said.

Kosar was adventurous and although he didn't try the local delicacy, dog meat, he did eat some turtle--"it was dark meat and tasted like beef." He was also given a concoction of turtle blood and vodka to drink and was also treated to a bright green drink that he later learned was "eviscerated turtle guts and vodka." He downed both.

One of the cultural highlights of his visit was a water puppet theatre presentation called "Dance of the Water Fairies." The performers, who guided the puppets over the water's surface, wore hip waders, Kosar said. Water puppetry dates back to 1,000 years when the farmers in the rice paddies entertained themselves and others with such shows, he explained.

During a question and answer period following his talk, Kosar noted that the economy in South Vietnam is experiencing "tremendous growth" of about nine per cent annually. Also, "the country is Communist in name only; the economy is definitely capitalist," he said.

While acknowledging that the local populace most likely thought that he was an American, Kosar said he didn't experience any resentment from the people. He never felt unsafe during his visit.

Having an international business career means there are many opportunities to experience different cultures, Kosar told the Rotarians.

It's a part of his job that he thoroughly enjoys. Plans are in the works for a visit to Darfur in east central Africa and possibly, Baghdad, Iraq.

At times it seems that Kosar barely has time to unpack his suitcases between missions.