Students asked to submit Flamborough motto

News Jan 20, 2010 Flamborough Review

Students from all of Flamborough’s elementary schools are being asked to come up with a motto that will be part of Flamborough’s new coat of arms. The contest, sponsored by the Flamborough Review in cooperation with the community-based Grant of Arms committee, was launched last week. The winning entry from each school will be submitted to the committee by Feb. 3.

The mottos, which will be two to five words and no more than 25 characters in length, will be published in the Review for readers to vote on in late February; the winner being announced shortly afterward.

Waterdown District High School (WDHS) history teacher Nathan Tidridge, who heads up the committee, is excited about involving schoolchildren in the history-making project that will lead to Flamborough having its own coat of arms. “This is an opportunity to involve students in their community – learning about their local history, geography and social milestones,” he said.

The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society (WEFHS) presented a petition in November to the Chief Herald of Canada to have a coat of arms designed to represent the Flamborough-Beverly area. The petition has been approved and Herald Forrest D. Pass, a specialist in designing grants of arms, has been assigned to the Flamborough file. If all goes as planned, the new coat of arms will be presented to the community in the fall.

The Grant of Arms committee was formed to advise the Herald in the construction of the coat of arms. The motto, featured at the base of the arms, can be in English or Latin and is a statement meant to convey what a community believes or what it looks like. Its purpose is to remind people of what is important in their community. The motto receiving the most votes will be recommended to the Herald for inclusion in the coat of arms.

In the meantime, the 20-member committee, composed of people from across the region, including historical groups, academics, and members of community groups, held its first meeting Jan. 2 and came up with three themes, trees, water and people, that it would like to see depicted in the coat of arms.

A rationale was developed for each theme: trees are depicted in most of the crests and seals used by the former Flamborough-Beverly Region and the lumber industry was a key foundation of the area’s early settlement; water is a significant part of the area’s natural features, and the people of the area, from the natives (Neutral First Nation) and the United Empire Loyalists who first settled here to the many other nationalities that came later and stayed to enrich the area.

Discussion also focused on ways to recognize the area’s strong agricultural roots and it was suggested that perhaps a horse could serve as a supporter of the shield of arms, representing an early source of transport as well as its connection to Flamborough Downs and the Rockton World’s Fair. A lion, representative of the area’s ties with the British Crown, was also suggested as a supporter.

The suggestions, along with questions on how to represent Flamborough’s unique heritage in the coat of arms, have been forwarded to Pass for comment. The Herald has agreed to wait until the public gets a chance to have input on what symbols it would like to see on the coat of arms before presenting his preliminary design.

Tidridge said he and the committee welcome suggestions from the public. They can be e-mailed to wefhs@hpl.ca (please put “Grant of Arms Committee” in the subject box) or mailed to: Grant of Arms Committee, The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society, 163 Dundas St. E., Waterdown, ON L0R 2H0.

The committee’s next meeting will be Feb. 6 at 1 p.m. in the former Beverly Township Hall, Rockton.

New members are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Students asked to submit Flamborough motto

News Jan 20, 2010 Flamborough Review

Students from all of Flamborough’s elementary schools are being asked to come up with a motto that will be part of Flamborough’s new coat of arms. The contest, sponsored by the Flamborough Review in cooperation with the community-based Grant of Arms committee, was launched last week. The winning entry from each school will be submitted to the committee by Feb. 3.

The mottos, which will be two to five words and no more than 25 characters in length, will be published in the Review for readers to vote on in late February; the winner being announced shortly afterward.

Waterdown District High School (WDHS) history teacher Nathan Tidridge, who heads up the committee, is excited about involving schoolchildren in the history-making project that will lead to Flamborough having its own coat of arms. “This is an opportunity to involve students in their community – learning about their local history, geography and social milestones,” he said.

The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society (WEFHS) presented a petition in November to the Chief Herald of Canada to have a coat of arms designed to represent the Flamborough-Beverly area. The petition has been approved and Herald Forrest D. Pass, a specialist in designing grants of arms, has been assigned to the Flamborough file. If all goes as planned, the new coat of arms will be presented to the community in the fall.

The Grant of Arms committee was formed to advise the Herald in the construction of the coat of arms. The motto, featured at the base of the arms, can be in English or Latin and is a statement meant to convey what a community believes or what it looks like. Its purpose is to remind people of what is important in their community. The motto receiving the most votes will be recommended to the Herald for inclusion in the coat of arms.

In the meantime, the 20-member committee, composed of people from across the region, including historical groups, academics, and members of community groups, held its first meeting Jan. 2 and came up with three themes, trees, water and people, that it would like to see depicted in the coat of arms.

A rationale was developed for each theme: trees are depicted in most of the crests and seals used by the former Flamborough-Beverly Region and the lumber industry was a key foundation of the area’s early settlement; water is a significant part of the area’s natural features, and the people of the area, from the natives (Neutral First Nation) and the United Empire Loyalists who first settled here to the many other nationalities that came later and stayed to enrich the area.

Discussion also focused on ways to recognize the area’s strong agricultural roots and it was suggested that perhaps a horse could serve as a supporter of the shield of arms, representing an early source of transport as well as its connection to Flamborough Downs and the Rockton World’s Fair. A lion, representative of the area’s ties with the British Crown, was also suggested as a supporter.

The suggestions, along with questions on how to represent Flamborough’s unique heritage in the coat of arms, have been forwarded to Pass for comment. The Herald has agreed to wait until the public gets a chance to have input on what symbols it would like to see on the coat of arms before presenting his preliminary design.

Tidridge said he and the committee welcome suggestions from the public. They can be e-mailed to wefhs@hpl.ca (please put “Grant of Arms Committee” in the subject box) or mailed to: Grant of Arms Committee, The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society, 163 Dundas St. E., Waterdown, ON L0R 2H0.

The committee’s next meeting will be Feb. 6 at 1 p.m. in the former Beverly Township Hall, Rockton.

New members are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Students asked to submit Flamborough motto

News Jan 20, 2010 Flamborough Review

Students from all of Flamborough’s elementary schools are being asked to come up with a motto that will be part of Flamborough’s new coat of arms. The contest, sponsored by the Flamborough Review in cooperation with the community-based Grant of Arms committee, was launched last week. The winning entry from each school will be submitted to the committee by Feb. 3.

The mottos, which will be two to five words and no more than 25 characters in length, will be published in the Review for readers to vote on in late February; the winner being announced shortly afterward.

Waterdown District High School (WDHS) history teacher Nathan Tidridge, who heads up the committee, is excited about involving schoolchildren in the history-making project that will lead to Flamborough having its own coat of arms. “This is an opportunity to involve students in their community – learning about their local history, geography and social milestones,” he said.

The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society (WEFHS) presented a petition in November to the Chief Herald of Canada to have a coat of arms designed to represent the Flamborough-Beverly area. The petition has been approved and Herald Forrest D. Pass, a specialist in designing grants of arms, has been assigned to the Flamborough file. If all goes as planned, the new coat of arms will be presented to the community in the fall.

The Grant of Arms committee was formed to advise the Herald in the construction of the coat of arms. The motto, featured at the base of the arms, can be in English or Latin and is a statement meant to convey what a community believes or what it looks like. Its purpose is to remind people of what is important in their community. The motto receiving the most votes will be recommended to the Herald for inclusion in the coat of arms.

In the meantime, the 20-member committee, composed of people from across the region, including historical groups, academics, and members of community groups, held its first meeting Jan. 2 and came up with three themes, trees, water and people, that it would like to see depicted in the coat of arms.

A rationale was developed for each theme: trees are depicted in most of the crests and seals used by the former Flamborough-Beverly Region and the lumber industry was a key foundation of the area’s early settlement; water is a significant part of the area’s natural features, and the people of the area, from the natives (Neutral First Nation) and the United Empire Loyalists who first settled here to the many other nationalities that came later and stayed to enrich the area.

Discussion also focused on ways to recognize the area’s strong agricultural roots and it was suggested that perhaps a horse could serve as a supporter of the shield of arms, representing an early source of transport as well as its connection to Flamborough Downs and the Rockton World’s Fair. A lion, representative of the area’s ties with the British Crown, was also suggested as a supporter.

The suggestions, along with questions on how to represent Flamborough’s unique heritage in the coat of arms, have been forwarded to Pass for comment. The Herald has agreed to wait until the public gets a chance to have input on what symbols it would like to see on the coat of arms before presenting his preliminary design.

Tidridge said he and the committee welcome suggestions from the public. They can be e-mailed to wefhs@hpl.ca (please put “Grant of Arms Committee” in the subject box) or mailed to: Grant of Arms Committee, The Waterdown East Flamborough Heritage Society, 163 Dundas St. E., Waterdown, ON L0R 2H0.

The committee’s next meeting will be Feb. 6 at 1 p.m. in the former Beverly Township Hall, Rockton.

New members are welcome and encouraged to attend.