Souharissen Natural Area dedicated in Waterdown

News Aug 22, 2014 Flamborough Review

By Mac Christie, Review Staff

Waterdown’s Souharrisen Natural Area, a 27-acre parcel of the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, was dedicated in a ceremony Aug. 21.

The dedication of the area, which is located on the south side of Dundas Street East, was done by Lt.-Gov. David Onley and New Credit Chief Brian Laforme.

The area includes more than 100 archeological sites, and Onley said the area is a testament to the enduring presence of First Nations peoples in Waterdown.

“The two of us are performing this dedication jointly to help foster an appreciation for those who lived here long ago,” said Onley, noting his ancestors were Loyalist settlers in the Niagara region. “The early peoples of this region will long be remembered.”

Laforme said he hopes the event marks the renewal of pledges of peace and friendship made in the Treaty of Niagara, 250 years ago this summer.

“It’s the beginning of a new partnership,” he said.

Laforme added the 104 archeological sites discovered in the natural area prove that at one time a flourishing Anishinabe culture existed along the shores of the Great Lakes.

“This truly is our homeland,” he said, “and returning home is always a good feeling.”

The plaque dedication took place along Burke Street and was attended by about 50 people. The area is named after Souharissen, a mid-16th century native chief in the area.

Event organizer and Souharissen Natural Area Committee chairperson Nathan Tidridge said the event restores aboriginal heritage to Flamborough.

He noted a sacred fire was lit in the morning of the event by Elder Garry Sault, the first sacred fire in the region in generations – and perhaps centuries.

The Waterdown District High School teacher said Sault was instrumental in writing the history of the land, which is seen on the monument stone.

Laforme also thanked all the youth who took part in the project, and Tidridge made special mention of graduating history students Kekoa Reinebold and Holly McCann.

The area, Tidridge said, is the result of years of work following the discovery of aboriginal sites in the region in 2005.

In May 2014, the committee, which includes, McCann, as researcher and cartographer, and Reinebold, as Alexander Brown cabin researcher, was formed to help create the area, which Tidridge said is meant to help restore aboriginal identity and heritage to the region.

In addition to the aboriginal sites discovered in the area, the foundations of a cabin – which may have been used by Brown and Merren Grierson, the first European settlers in Waterdown – was discovered.

A second plaque, with an inscription penned by Reinebold, was also unveiled following the ceremony to commemorate the cabin site.

Souharissen Natural Area dedicated in Waterdown

News Aug 22, 2014 Flamborough Review

By Mac Christie, Review Staff

Waterdown’s Souharrisen Natural Area, a 27-acre parcel of the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, was dedicated in a ceremony Aug. 21.

The dedication of the area, which is located on the south side of Dundas Street East, was done by Lt.-Gov. David Onley and New Credit Chief Brian Laforme.

The area includes more than 100 archeological sites, and Onley said the area is a testament to the enduring presence of First Nations peoples in Waterdown.

“The two of us are performing this dedication jointly to help foster an appreciation for those who lived here long ago,” said Onley, noting his ancestors were Loyalist settlers in the Niagara region. “The early peoples of this region will long be remembered.”

Laforme said he hopes the event marks the renewal of pledges of peace and friendship made in the Treaty of Niagara, 250 years ago this summer.

“It’s the beginning of a new partnership,” he said.

Laforme added the 104 archeological sites discovered in the natural area prove that at one time a flourishing Anishinabe culture existed along the shores of the Great Lakes.

“This truly is our homeland,” he said, “and returning home is always a good feeling.”

The plaque dedication took place along Burke Street and was attended by about 50 people. The area is named after Souharissen, a mid-16th century native chief in the area.

Event organizer and Souharissen Natural Area Committee chairperson Nathan Tidridge said the event restores aboriginal heritage to Flamborough.

He noted a sacred fire was lit in the morning of the event by Elder Garry Sault, the first sacred fire in the region in generations – and perhaps centuries.

The Waterdown District High School teacher said Sault was instrumental in writing the history of the land, which is seen on the monument stone.

Laforme also thanked all the youth who took part in the project, and Tidridge made special mention of graduating history students Kekoa Reinebold and Holly McCann.

The area, Tidridge said, is the result of years of work following the discovery of aboriginal sites in the region in 2005.

In May 2014, the committee, which includes, McCann, as researcher and cartographer, and Reinebold, as Alexander Brown cabin researcher, was formed to help create the area, which Tidridge said is meant to help restore aboriginal identity and heritage to the region.

In addition to the aboriginal sites discovered in the area, the foundations of a cabin – which may have been used by Brown and Merren Grierson, the first European settlers in Waterdown – was discovered.

A second plaque, with an inscription penned by Reinebold, was also unveiled following the ceremony to commemorate the cabin site.

Souharissen Natural Area dedicated in Waterdown

News Aug 22, 2014 Flamborough Review

By Mac Christie, Review Staff

Waterdown’s Souharrisen Natural Area, a 27-acre parcel of the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, was dedicated in a ceremony Aug. 21.

The dedication of the area, which is located on the south side of Dundas Street East, was done by Lt.-Gov. David Onley and New Credit Chief Brian Laforme.

The area includes more than 100 archeological sites, and Onley said the area is a testament to the enduring presence of First Nations peoples in Waterdown.

“The two of us are performing this dedication jointly to help foster an appreciation for those who lived here long ago,” said Onley, noting his ancestors were Loyalist settlers in the Niagara region. “The early peoples of this region will long be remembered.”

Laforme said he hopes the event marks the renewal of pledges of peace and friendship made in the Treaty of Niagara, 250 years ago this summer.

“It’s the beginning of a new partnership,” he said.

Laforme added the 104 archeological sites discovered in the natural area prove that at one time a flourishing Anishinabe culture existed along the shores of the Great Lakes.

“This truly is our homeland,” he said, “and returning home is always a good feeling.”

The plaque dedication took place along Burke Street and was attended by about 50 people. The area is named after Souharissen, a mid-16th century native chief in the area.

Event organizer and Souharissen Natural Area Committee chairperson Nathan Tidridge said the event restores aboriginal heritage to Flamborough.

He noted a sacred fire was lit in the morning of the event by Elder Garry Sault, the first sacred fire in the region in generations – and perhaps centuries.

The Waterdown District High School teacher said Sault was instrumental in writing the history of the land, which is seen on the monument stone.

Laforme also thanked all the youth who took part in the project, and Tidridge made special mention of graduating history students Kekoa Reinebold and Holly McCann.

The area, Tidridge said, is the result of years of work following the discovery of aboriginal sites in the region in 2005.

In May 2014, the committee, which includes, McCann, as researcher and cartographer, and Reinebold, as Alexander Brown cabin researcher, was formed to help create the area, which Tidridge said is meant to help restore aboriginal identity and heritage to the region.

In addition to the aboriginal sites discovered in the area, the foundations of a cabin – which may have been used by Brown and Merren Grierson, the first European settlers in Waterdown – was discovered.

A second plaque, with an inscription penned by Reinebold, was also unveiled following the ceremony to commemorate the cabin site.