New medical centre planned for Waterdown

News Apr 09, 2015 by Catherine O’Hara Flamborough Review

Construction of a new, multi-service medical building at Clappison’s Corners is expected to begin this summer.

The 50,000-square-foot facility, to be located on the east side of Clappison Avenue just north of Starbucks, will feature a walk-in clinic, pharmacy, family practices, diagnostic imaging and laboratory services, and adjunctive medical services under one roof.

Patients, said the project’s medical director Dr. Arshad Hack, want to receive health-care services in a “convenient, high-quality fashion.”

By opening the door to a variety of services and specialties, the new medical establishment will give patients what they are looking for – “consolidated services,” said Hack, chief of family medicine at Joseph Brant Hospital. “Our model is really focused more on comprehensive health care and providing quality, family practice services to the patients.”

Recruitment of physicians, practices and ancillary service providers is underway. The project, said Hack, has piqued the interest of doctors, who are keen on joining a facility that fosters a team approach to patient care.

The building will feature cutting-edge technology, including electronic interconnectivity between in-house practices and the clinic. For patients, Hack is exploring the potential for a mobile app, among other user-friendly widgets. In the event a doctor is running late, Hack suggested the app could send patients a text message 10 minutes before they are called into the examination room, affording them the freedom to leave the waiting area to shop or grab a coffee.

Development of the comprehensive medical facility, by Krpan Group, is exciting, said Hack.

“Being allowed to be a part of a project like this is super exciting because I really get to shape the direction that it takes and be able to have more of an influence on that direction,” said the Burlington-based doctor, who cares for many Waterdown patients.

The facility will also help address the doctor shortage affecting Flamborough, said Hack. With the new medical centre slated for opening in July 2016, there will be ample opportunity for residents to sign on to a family doctor locally.

“We’ll be accepting a lot of new patients,” he said.

Currently, there aren’t enough doctors in Waterdown for the community’s growing population. According to Hamilton Physician Recruitment Specialist Jane Walker, enlisting doctors to set up shop in Waterdown and East Flamborough was made more challenging after the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care put a freeze on the establishment of new family health teams and organizations.

New doctors, noted Walker, are primarily trained to work in team settings, which often come with a capitated payment model that allows them to receive salary wages instead of a fee for service.

The capitated model, noted Hack, helps promote comprehensive patient care by alleviating the pressure on doctors to see an increased number of patients in order to generate income.

“Unfortunately, with the next unilaterally imposed negotiations with the government, there are no family health organizations or family health teams that new doctors are allowed to join,” said the family physician. “That means that everybody who is looking to work now, particularly new graduates or doctors who are not in a capitated model, they need to go fee-for-service. That’s not ideal for the population of east Flamborough.”

Walker continues to pound the pavement in search of doctors willing to make the transition to Waterdown. Over the years, many have passed on the opportunity to establish practices in town because no facility offered the preferred model.

“The fact that Waterdown doesn’t have a family health team has been huge in terms of preventing or inhibiting recruitment,” said Walker. “If they can get that in Burlington or another part of Hamilton or Brantford or Toronto, they will go to those places first.”

The medical building at Clappison’s Corners could be the golden ticket that brings new doctors to town.

“If we were able to lobby and advocate for a family health team or at least a family health organization in the east Flamborough area, particularly in Waterdown, I really feel as though that would allow us to recruit wonderful, quality doctors and better meet the needs of the patients in Waterdown,” said Hack, whose next steps include putting together a proposal for the ministry’s consideration and reaching out to Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin for his support.

Until then, Hack is planning for an integrated fee-for-service model, while Walker continues to drum up interest from physicians.

At a March 26 information meeting about the new development, more than 30 physicians turned out to hear details of Hack’s plans for the medical facility and provide input. There, some existing Waterdown physicians expressed interest in relocating their practices to the new facility.

“If doctors are interested in doing that, it’s wonderful and we definitely welcome them,” he said.

And with the community’s population expected to swell to 31,000 by early 2019, additional doctors will be needed. “We know that the need for new doctors in the community is also going to be very high, which is the reason why a lot of the new, young doctors are interested in setting up their practices in the Waterdown area,” said Hack, who welcomes interested health-care providers to contact him for more information.

Hack can be reached at dr.arshad.hack@josephbranthospital.ca.

New medical centre planned for Waterdown

News Apr 09, 2015 by Catherine O’Hara Flamborough Review

Construction of a new, multi-service medical building at Clappison’s Corners is expected to begin this summer.

The 50,000-square-foot facility, to be located on the east side of Clappison Avenue just north of Starbucks, will feature a walk-in clinic, pharmacy, family practices, diagnostic imaging and laboratory services, and adjunctive medical services under one roof.

Patients, said the project’s medical director Dr. Arshad Hack, want to receive health-care services in a “convenient, high-quality fashion.”

By opening the door to a variety of services and specialties, the new medical establishment will give patients what they are looking for – “consolidated services,” said Hack, chief of family medicine at Joseph Brant Hospital. “Our model is really focused more on comprehensive health care and providing quality, family practice services to the patients.”

Recruitment of physicians, practices and ancillary service providers is underway. The project, said Hack, has piqued the interest of doctors, who are keen on joining a facility that fosters a team approach to patient care.

The building will feature cutting-edge technology, including electronic interconnectivity between in-house practices and the clinic. For patients, Hack is exploring the potential for a mobile app, among other user-friendly widgets. In the event a doctor is running late, Hack suggested the app could send patients a text message 10 minutes before they are called into the examination room, affording them the freedom to leave the waiting area to shop or grab a coffee.

Development of the comprehensive medical facility, by Krpan Group, is exciting, said Hack.

“Being allowed to be a part of a project like this is super exciting because I really get to shape the direction that it takes and be able to have more of an influence on that direction,” said the Burlington-based doctor, who cares for many Waterdown patients.

The facility will also help address the doctor shortage affecting Flamborough, said Hack. With the new medical centre slated for opening in July 2016, there will be ample opportunity for residents to sign on to a family doctor locally.

“We’ll be accepting a lot of new patients,” he said.

Currently, there aren’t enough doctors in Waterdown for the community’s growing population. According to Hamilton Physician Recruitment Specialist Jane Walker, enlisting doctors to set up shop in Waterdown and East Flamborough was made more challenging after the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care put a freeze on the establishment of new family health teams and organizations.

New doctors, noted Walker, are primarily trained to work in team settings, which often come with a capitated payment model that allows them to receive salary wages instead of a fee for service.

The capitated model, noted Hack, helps promote comprehensive patient care by alleviating the pressure on doctors to see an increased number of patients in order to generate income.

“Unfortunately, with the next unilaterally imposed negotiations with the government, there are no family health organizations or family health teams that new doctors are allowed to join,” said the family physician. “That means that everybody who is looking to work now, particularly new graduates or doctors who are not in a capitated model, they need to go fee-for-service. That’s not ideal for the population of east Flamborough.”

Walker continues to pound the pavement in search of doctors willing to make the transition to Waterdown. Over the years, many have passed on the opportunity to establish practices in town because no facility offered the preferred model.

“The fact that Waterdown doesn’t have a family health team has been huge in terms of preventing or inhibiting recruitment,” said Walker. “If they can get that in Burlington or another part of Hamilton or Brantford or Toronto, they will go to those places first.”

The medical building at Clappison’s Corners could be the golden ticket that brings new doctors to town.

“If we were able to lobby and advocate for a family health team or at least a family health organization in the east Flamborough area, particularly in Waterdown, I really feel as though that would allow us to recruit wonderful, quality doctors and better meet the needs of the patients in Waterdown,” said Hack, whose next steps include putting together a proposal for the ministry’s consideration and reaching out to Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin for his support.

Until then, Hack is planning for an integrated fee-for-service model, while Walker continues to drum up interest from physicians.

At a March 26 information meeting about the new development, more than 30 physicians turned out to hear details of Hack’s plans for the medical facility and provide input. There, some existing Waterdown physicians expressed interest in relocating their practices to the new facility.

“If doctors are interested in doing that, it’s wonderful and we definitely welcome them,” he said.

And with the community’s population expected to swell to 31,000 by early 2019, additional doctors will be needed. “We know that the need for new doctors in the community is also going to be very high, which is the reason why a lot of the new, young doctors are interested in setting up their practices in the Waterdown area,” said Hack, who welcomes interested health-care providers to contact him for more information.

Hack can be reached at dr.arshad.hack@josephbranthospital.ca.

New medical centre planned for Waterdown

News Apr 09, 2015 by Catherine O’Hara Flamborough Review

Construction of a new, multi-service medical building at Clappison’s Corners is expected to begin this summer.

The 50,000-square-foot facility, to be located on the east side of Clappison Avenue just north of Starbucks, will feature a walk-in clinic, pharmacy, family practices, diagnostic imaging and laboratory services, and adjunctive medical services under one roof.

Patients, said the project’s medical director Dr. Arshad Hack, want to receive health-care services in a “convenient, high-quality fashion.”

By opening the door to a variety of services and specialties, the new medical establishment will give patients what they are looking for – “consolidated services,” said Hack, chief of family medicine at Joseph Brant Hospital. “Our model is really focused more on comprehensive health care and providing quality, family practice services to the patients.”

Recruitment of physicians, practices and ancillary service providers is underway. The project, said Hack, has piqued the interest of doctors, who are keen on joining a facility that fosters a team approach to patient care.

The building will feature cutting-edge technology, including electronic interconnectivity between in-house practices and the clinic. For patients, Hack is exploring the potential for a mobile app, among other user-friendly widgets. In the event a doctor is running late, Hack suggested the app could send patients a text message 10 minutes before they are called into the examination room, affording them the freedom to leave the waiting area to shop or grab a coffee.

Development of the comprehensive medical facility, by Krpan Group, is exciting, said Hack.

“Being allowed to be a part of a project like this is super exciting because I really get to shape the direction that it takes and be able to have more of an influence on that direction,” said the Burlington-based doctor, who cares for many Waterdown patients.

The facility will also help address the doctor shortage affecting Flamborough, said Hack. With the new medical centre slated for opening in July 2016, there will be ample opportunity for residents to sign on to a family doctor locally.

“We’ll be accepting a lot of new patients,” he said.

Currently, there aren’t enough doctors in Waterdown for the community’s growing population. According to Hamilton Physician Recruitment Specialist Jane Walker, enlisting doctors to set up shop in Waterdown and East Flamborough was made more challenging after the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care put a freeze on the establishment of new family health teams and organizations.

New doctors, noted Walker, are primarily trained to work in team settings, which often come with a capitated payment model that allows them to receive salary wages instead of a fee for service.

The capitated model, noted Hack, helps promote comprehensive patient care by alleviating the pressure on doctors to see an increased number of patients in order to generate income.

“Unfortunately, with the next unilaterally imposed negotiations with the government, there are no family health organizations or family health teams that new doctors are allowed to join,” said the family physician. “That means that everybody who is looking to work now, particularly new graduates or doctors who are not in a capitated model, they need to go fee-for-service. That’s not ideal for the population of east Flamborough.”

Walker continues to pound the pavement in search of doctors willing to make the transition to Waterdown. Over the years, many have passed on the opportunity to establish practices in town because no facility offered the preferred model.

“The fact that Waterdown doesn’t have a family health team has been huge in terms of preventing or inhibiting recruitment,” said Walker. “If they can get that in Burlington or another part of Hamilton or Brantford or Toronto, they will go to those places first.”

The medical building at Clappison’s Corners could be the golden ticket that brings new doctors to town.

“If we were able to lobby and advocate for a family health team or at least a family health organization in the east Flamborough area, particularly in Waterdown, I really feel as though that would allow us to recruit wonderful, quality doctors and better meet the needs of the patients in Waterdown,” said Hack, whose next steps include putting together a proposal for the ministry’s consideration and reaching out to Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin for his support.

Until then, Hack is planning for an integrated fee-for-service model, while Walker continues to drum up interest from physicians.

At a March 26 information meeting about the new development, more than 30 physicians turned out to hear details of Hack’s plans for the medical facility and provide input. There, some existing Waterdown physicians expressed interest in relocating their practices to the new facility.

“If doctors are interested in doing that, it’s wonderful and we definitely welcome them,” he said.

And with the community’s population expected to swell to 31,000 by early 2019, additional doctors will be needed. “We know that the need for new doctors in the community is also going to be very high, which is the reason why a lot of the new, young doctors are interested in setting up their practices in the Waterdown area,” said Hack, who welcomes interested health-care providers to contact him for more information.

Hack can be reached at dr.arshad.hack@josephbranthospital.ca.