Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP candidate Mike DiLivio says Canadian voters got the message

News Oct 21, 2015 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

NDP candidate Mike DiLivio, who finished third in the four-way race for the reconfigured riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook during Monday’s federal election, said Canadian voters responded “resoundingly” to the message that Canada needed a change in government.

“Unfortunately, it didn’t go the way we had hoped,” he added with voters choosing the Liberals as the agents of change rather than the NDP.

In Flamborough-Glanbrook, Conservative David Sweet was successful in staving off the Liberal tide edging out Grit Jennifer Stebbing with 24,136 votes to her 21,669. DiLivio captured 7,773 votes and Green Party candidate David Urquhart finished with 1,870.

Although DiLivio, a 32-year-old upper Stoney Creek resident, was still waiting for poll-by-poll numbers at 11:40 p.m. Monday when contacted for comment, it was clear by then the race for the riding seat was between Sweet and Stebbing. The votes that he had pulled in were “a little less” than expected, he said, but “that’s politics . . . it’s a fickle business,” he observed.

The first-time candidate accepted defeat without bitterness, saying, “You just pick yourself up and go from there.” He took a break from his job as a union electrician to devote his energies to the campaign, but plans to return to work soon.

DiLivio chose to spend election night at a private home in Binbrook, where he watched poll results trickle in over the television with supporters and his campaign manager, Sharon Hambleton. Early in the evening, he predicted a gain in seats for the NDP nationally, but the “orange crush” of 2011 fizzled and the party dropped from 96 to 44 seats as the Liberal tide swept across the country.

He expressed surprise and disappointment over the loss of NDP seats, but took consolation in it being “the second best finish of all (federal) elections” for the party which celebrated its best showing in the last race.

But DiLivio refused to give the Liberal platform of carrying a deficit for three years while investing in infrastructure any credit for the party’s popularity at the polls this time around. Rather, he said that the Liberals’ success was the result of “strategic voting,” or anti-Harper votes for change.

Describing the 78-day campaign as both “interesting and long,” the father of two paid tribute to the “hard work and dedication” of volunteers who worked with him. He enjoyed the experience of running for political office, he said, while lauding fellow candidates for running a good campaign.

DiLivio also passed along his congratulations to Sweet, who was MP for the former riding of Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale for almost 10 years.

“I wish him the best and hope he continues to do a good job.”

Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP candidate Mike DiLivio says Canadian voters got the message

News Oct 21, 2015 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

NDP candidate Mike DiLivio, who finished third in the four-way race for the reconfigured riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook during Monday’s federal election, said Canadian voters responded “resoundingly” to the message that Canada needed a change in government.

“Unfortunately, it didn’t go the way we had hoped,” he added with voters choosing the Liberals as the agents of change rather than the NDP.

In Flamborough-Glanbrook, Conservative David Sweet was successful in staving off the Liberal tide edging out Grit Jennifer Stebbing with 24,136 votes to her 21,669. DiLivio captured 7,773 votes and Green Party candidate David Urquhart finished with 1,870.

Although DiLivio, a 32-year-old upper Stoney Creek resident, was still waiting for poll-by-poll numbers at 11:40 p.m. Monday when contacted for comment, it was clear by then the race for the riding seat was between Sweet and Stebbing. The votes that he had pulled in were “a little less” than expected, he said, but “that’s politics . . . it’s a fickle business,” he observed.

The first-time candidate accepted defeat without bitterness, saying, “You just pick yourself up and go from there.” He took a break from his job as a union electrician to devote his energies to the campaign, but plans to return to work soon.

DiLivio chose to spend election night at a private home in Binbrook, where he watched poll results trickle in over the television with supporters and his campaign manager, Sharon Hambleton. Early in the evening, he predicted a gain in seats for the NDP nationally, but the “orange crush” of 2011 fizzled and the party dropped from 96 to 44 seats as the Liberal tide swept across the country.

He expressed surprise and disappointment over the loss of NDP seats, but took consolation in it being “the second best finish of all (federal) elections” for the party which celebrated its best showing in the last race.

But DiLivio refused to give the Liberal platform of carrying a deficit for three years while investing in infrastructure any credit for the party’s popularity at the polls this time around. Rather, he said that the Liberals’ success was the result of “strategic voting,” or anti-Harper votes for change.

Describing the 78-day campaign as both “interesting and long,” the father of two paid tribute to the “hard work and dedication” of volunteers who worked with him. He enjoyed the experience of running for political office, he said, while lauding fellow candidates for running a good campaign.

DiLivio also passed along his congratulations to Sweet, who was MP for the former riding of Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale for almost 10 years.

“I wish him the best and hope he continues to do a good job.”

Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP candidate Mike DiLivio says Canadian voters got the message

News Oct 21, 2015 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

NDP candidate Mike DiLivio, who finished third in the four-way race for the reconfigured riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook during Monday’s federal election, said Canadian voters responded “resoundingly” to the message that Canada needed a change in government.

“Unfortunately, it didn’t go the way we had hoped,” he added with voters choosing the Liberals as the agents of change rather than the NDP.

In Flamborough-Glanbrook, Conservative David Sweet was successful in staving off the Liberal tide edging out Grit Jennifer Stebbing with 24,136 votes to her 21,669. DiLivio captured 7,773 votes and Green Party candidate David Urquhart finished with 1,870.

Although DiLivio, a 32-year-old upper Stoney Creek resident, was still waiting for poll-by-poll numbers at 11:40 p.m. Monday when contacted for comment, it was clear by then the race for the riding seat was between Sweet and Stebbing. The votes that he had pulled in were “a little less” than expected, he said, but “that’s politics . . . it’s a fickle business,” he observed.

The first-time candidate accepted defeat without bitterness, saying, “You just pick yourself up and go from there.” He took a break from his job as a union electrician to devote his energies to the campaign, but plans to return to work soon.

DiLivio chose to spend election night at a private home in Binbrook, where he watched poll results trickle in over the television with supporters and his campaign manager, Sharon Hambleton. Early in the evening, he predicted a gain in seats for the NDP nationally, but the “orange crush” of 2011 fizzled and the party dropped from 96 to 44 seats as the Liberal tide swept across the country.

He expressed surprise and disappointment over the loss of NDP seats, but took consolation in it being “the second best finish of all (federal) elections” for the party which celebrated its best showing in the last race.

But DiLivio refused to give the Liberal platform of carrying a deficit for three years while investing in infrastructure any credit for the party’s popularity at the polls this time around. Rather, he said that the Liberals’ success was the result of “strategic voting,” or anti-Harper votes for change.

Describing the 78-day campaign as both “interesting and long,” the father of two paid tribute to the “hard work and dedication” of volunteers who worked with him. He enjoyed the experience of running for political office, he said, while lauding fellow candidates for running a good campaign.

DiLivio also passed along his congratulations to Sweet, who was MP for the former riding of Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale for almost 10 years.

“I wish him the best and hope he continues to do a good job.”