Flamborough Chamber members learn about Enbridge Line 10 replacement project

News Nov 02, 2015 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Members of the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce got to hear first-hand about the proposed replacement of Enbridge’s Line 10 pipeline Oct. 28 at a business roundtable lunch.

The Line 10 pipeline runs from Westover through Binbrook to the U.S. border, before continuing on to a refinery in Warren, Penn. The section of pipeline slated to be replaced runs from Westover to the Nanticoke junction.

Enbridge stakeholder relations advisor Brent Bullough told the Chamber members the replacement is a “routine maintenance project” for the company.

He said part of the reason for the replacement is numerous integrity digs the company has to do on the current pipeline to ensure the line is safe.

“We’re continually monitoring our system – when we find an anomaly with our internal monitoring tool, we go out and take a look at it to visually inspect that line,” he said. “We’ll dig it up and that’s called an integrity dig.

“Those are getting to be onerous for landowners,” he added. “We’re out there a lot, we’re digging up people’s back yard’s a lot, we’re digging up golf courses a lot. At this point we’ve determined that it’s probably best to replace that section with a new section of pipe.”

In addition, Bullough said, Enbridge is running the current 35-km stretch under a self-imposed pressure restriction, as the pipeline bottlenecks from a 20-inch pipe to a 12-inch pipe for the 35 km, before becoming 20-inch pipe again.

He added the change will not result in a regulatory increase, but will allow the company to run at the pipeline’s approved capacity.

Bullough said for the most part, the replacement line will run beside the existing pipeline’s right-of-way, detouring around several area golf courses and other environmental features.

He noted the new route would bypass Flamborough Hills, Copetown Woods, Knollwood, and Southern Pines golf clubs, as well as a built-up area of Mount Hope.

Bullough said Enbridge’s submission to the National Energy Board (NEB) will be to decommission the line in place.

“We’ve done that before, in our mind it’s less intrusive than the option to pull it out,” he said. “Instead of going to somebody’s backyard or land and digging a trench and putting a new pipe in, we’d also be pulling the old pipe out.”

He added pulling the decommissioned pipeline out of the ground could cause soil instability in the area, which might affect nearby pipelines such as Line 11.

“When we leave it in place we don’t just forget about it,” he said. “We’re for that pipeline forever, essentially.”

Enbridge’s assistant construction manager of major projects Michael Jespersen explained that to decommission the pipe, the oil is pushed out by a piece of equipment, before the pipe is cleaned with a solvent solution. The pipeline is then cut off from any pumping stations or valves and capped.

“We don’t have the final plan yet in this case,” he said. “What will typically happen is we’ll cut the pipe in numerous locations and cap it, so it’s not one continuous system.

“They have put nitrogen in it in the past – nitrogen keeps a little bit of positive pressure in the line.”

As well. the pipeline is afforded cathodic protection – which puts an electric current through the line to prevent corrosion.

The company will then monitor the pipeline to ensure its integrity.

Bullough noted the project was initiated in June, with community consultation currently taking place. The company is targeting the end of November for a submission to the NEB.

Bullough said if everything goes well, the company will begin construction in the third quarter of 2017 and have the pipeline in service by the first quarter of 2018.

He noted the installation process will see the right of way graded before the pipeline is laid and bent to the contours of the path. Then the pipeline is welded and coated with an epoxy resin, Bullough explained, before it is trenched and laid in the ground.

The line then goes through a hydrostatic test, in which it is filled with water and pressurized.

Enbridge will host open house meetings for public consultation in the coming weeks, Bullough added. He said the company will look to hire a contractor in 2017 and expects to employ about 300 people over the course of the project.

Flamborough Chamber members learn about Enbridge Line 10 replacement project

News Nov 02, 2015 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Members of the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce got to hear first-hand about the proposed replacement of Enbridge’s Line 10 pipeline Oct. 28 at a business roundtable lunch.

The Line 10 pipeline runs from Westover through Binbrook to the U.S. border, before continuing on to a refinery in Warren, Penn. The section of pipeline slated to be replaced runs from Westover to the Nanticoke junction.

Enbridge stakeholder relations advisor Brent Bullough told the Chamber members the replacement is a “routine maintenance project” for the company.

He said part of the reason for the replacement is numerous integrity digs the company has to do on the current pipeline to ensure the line is safe.

“We’re continually monitoring our system – when we find an anomaly with our internal monitoring tool, we go out and take a look at it to visually inspect that line,” he said. “We’ll dig it up and that’s called an integrity dig.

“Those are getting to be onerous for landowners,” he added. “We’re out there a lot, we’re digging up people’s back yard’s a lot, we’re digging up golf courses a lot. At this point we’ve determined that it’s probably best to replace that section with a new section of pipe.”

In addition, Bullough said, Enbridge is running the current 35-km stretch under a self-imposed pressure restriction, as the pipeline bottlenecks from a 20-inch pipe to a 12-inch pipe for the 35 km, before becoming 20-inch pipe again.

He added the change will not result in a regulatory increase, but will allow the company to run at the pipeline’s approved capacity.

Bullough said for the most part, the replacement line will run beside the existing pipeline’s right-of-way, detouring around several area golf courses and other environmental features.

He noted the new route would bypass Flamborough Hills, Copetown Woods, Knollwood, and Southern Pines golf clubs, as well as a built-up area of Mount Hope.

Bullough said Enbridge’s submission to the National Energy Board (NEB) will be to decommission the line in place.

“We’ve done that before, in our mind it’s less intrusive than the option to pull it out,” he said. “Instead of going to somebody’s backyard or land and digging a trench and putting a new pipe in, we’d also be pulling the old pipe out.”

He added pulling the decommissioned pipeline out of the ground could cause soil instability in the area, which might affect nearby pipelines such as Line 11.

“When we leave it in place we don’t just forget about it,” he said. “We’re for that pipeline forever, essentially.”

Enbridge’s assistant construction manager of major projects Michael Jespersen explained that to decommission the pipe, the oil is pushed out by a piece of equipment, before the pipe is cleaned with a solvent solution. The pipeline is then cut off from any pumping stations or valves and capped.

“We don’t have the final plan yet in this case,” he said. “What will typically happen is we’ll cut the pipe in numerous locations and cap it, so it’s not one continuous system.

“They have put nitrogen in it in the past – nitrogen keeps a little bit of positive pressure in the line.”

As well. the pipeline is afforded cathodic protection – which puts an electric current through the line to prevent corrosion.

The company will then monitor the pipeline to ensure its integrity.

Bullough noted the project was initiated in June, with community consultation currently taking place. The company is targeting the end of November for a submission to the NEB.

Bullough said if everything goes well, the company will begin construction in the third quarter of 2017 and have the pipeline in service by the first quarter of 2018.

He noted the installation process will see the right of way graded before the pipeline is laid and bent to the contours of the path. Then the pipeline is welded and coated with an epoxy resin, Bullough explained, before it is trenched and laid in the ground.

The line then goes through a hydrostatic test, in which it is filled with water and pressurized.

Enbridge will host open house meetings for public consultation in the coming weeks, Bullough added. He said the company will look to hire a contractor in 2017 and expects to employ about 300 people over the course of the project.

Flamborough Chamber members learn about Enbridge Line 10 replacement project

News Nov 02, 2015 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Members of the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce got to hear first-hand about the proposed replacement of Enbridge’s Line 10 pipeline Oct. 28 at a business roundtable lunch.

The Line 10 pipeline runs from Westover through Binbrook to the U.S. border, before continuing on to a refinery in Warren, Penn. The section of pipeline slated to be replaced runs from Westover to the Nanticoke junction.

Enbridge stakeholder relations advisor Brent Bullough told the Chamber members the replacement is a “routine maintenance project” for the company.

He said part of the reason for the replacement is numerous integrity digs the company has to do on the current pipeline to ensure the line is safe.

“We’re continually monitoring our system – when we find an anomaly with our internal monitoring tool, we go out and take a look at it to visually inspect that line,” he said. “We’ll dig it up and that’s called an integrity dig.

“Those are getting to be onerous for landowners,” he added. “We’re out there a lot, we’re digging up people’s back yard’s a lot, we’re digging up golf courses a lot. At this point we’ve determined that it’s probably best to replace that section with a new section of pipe.”

In addition, Bullough said, Enbridge is running the current 35-km stretch under a self-imposed pressure restriction, as the pipeline bottlenecks from a 20-inch pipe to a 12-inch pipe for the 35 km, before becoming 20-inch pipe again.

He added the change will not result in a regulatory increase, but will allow the company to run at the pipeline’s approved capacity.

Bullough said for the most part, the replacement line will run beside the existing pipeline’s right-of-way, detouring around several area golf courses and other environmental features.

He noted the new route would bypass Flamborough Hills, Copetown Woods, Knollwood, and Southern Pines golf clubs, as well as a built-up area of Mount Hope.

Bullough said Enbridge’s submission to the National Energy Board (NEB) will be to decommission the line in place.

“We’ve done that before, in our mind it’s less intrusive than the option to pull it out,” he said. “Instead of going to somebody’s backyard or land and digging a trench and putting a new pipe in, we’d also be pulling the old pipe out.”

He added pulling the decommissioned pipeline out of the ground could cause soil instability in the area, which might affect nearby pipelines such as Line 11.

“When we leave it in place we don’t just forget about it,” he said. “We’re for that pipeline forever, essentially.”

Enbridge’s assistant construction manager of major projects Michael Jespersen explained that to decommission the pipe, the oil is pushed out by a piece of equipment, before the pipe is cleaned with a solvent solution. The pipeline is then cut off from any pumping stations or valves and capped.

“We don’t have the final plan yet in this case,” he said. “What will typically happen is we’ll cut the pipe in numerous locations and cap it, so it’s not one continuous system.

“They have put nitrogen in it in the past – nitrogen keeps a little bit of positive pressure in the line.”

As well. the pipeline is afforded cathodic protection – which puts an electric current through the line to prevent corrosion.

The company will then monitor the pipeline to ensure its integrity.

Bullough noted the project was initiated in June, with community consultation currently taking place. The company is targeting the end of November for a submission to the NEB.

Bullough said if everything goes well, the company will begin construction in the third quarter of 2017 and have the pipeline in service by the first quarter of 2018.

He noted the installation process will see the right of way graded before the pipeline is laid and bent to the contours of the path. Then the pipeline is welded and coated with an epoxy resin, Bullough explained, before it is trenched and laid in the ground.

The line then goes through a hydrostatic test, in which it is filled with water and pressurized.

Enbridge will host open house meetings for public consultation in the coming weeks, Bullough added. He said the company will look to hire a contractor in 2017 and expects to employ about 300 people over the course of the project.