Sweet reflects on election, sitting in Opposition and the challenges serving new Flamborough-Glanbrook riding

News Nov 02, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Newly-elected Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet spoke to the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce Oct. 28, sharing his thoughts on the election and working as a member of the Official Opposition.

Sweet, who served as the MP for the now-defunct Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding since 2006, had always sat as a government member.

“My party finds itself in a situation where we are now in Opposition,” he said at a lunchtime business roundtable at Harry Howell Arena. “Now our responsibility is to hold the government to account, to use every tool we can to not only publicly, and through the media, hold them to account in the House, but to also make sure we get the word out to constituents about any concerns that we have that they should have.”

Sweet noted being on the Opposition bench could be a learning process for him, but said he doesn’t intend to change his message from the campaign.

“I’m profoundly concerned about the tax increases that Mr. Trudeau is talking about, the payroll tax increases that are going to affect you,” he said. “I’m concerned about the elimination of income splitting for families – they’ve assured seniors that they’re going to retain it, we’ll see how that goes.

“I’m also concerned about the military and the kind of spending cuts that will occur there.”

Despite being in Opposition, Sweet said he’ll still be a strong voice for constituents.

“Our constituency office doors are always open,” he said. “We’ll be glad to help with any circumstance.”

Sweet said his staff understands many constituents often aren’t sure what issues fall under municipal, provincial or federal jurisdiction.

Sweet noted his office has a good working relationship with Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin’s office, as well as Ward 14 councillor Robert Pasuta and Ward 15 councillor Judi Partridge.

“It’s a one-stop shop for you, if you want to call us and we’ll try to get you to the right resource to fix your problem.”

While noting the FCC is fiercly non-partisan, executive director Arend Kerstern said the Chamber has enjoyed wonderful relationship with Sweet during his time in office.

Sweet noted the Chamber hosted two debates and thanked them for their efforts.

In the days ahead, Sweet said the Conservative Party will be appointing an interim leader, before developing a process to elect a permanent party leader.

“In regards to our party, I’m very hopeful that those things will be worked out rather effectively and transparently and with integrity,” he said, noting the interim leader is expected to be selected Nov, 5 at the party’s caucus meeting.

He noted the election was a late night – adding Liberal candidate Jennifer Stebbing called him to concede around 11:30 p.m.

Sweet said party polling had shown the race was going to be close, but said the party thought it would be a minority government.

Partridge asked Sweet about the status of the Randle Reef project, in light of the government change and US Steel’s uncertainty. US Steel is contributing $37 million in steel to the containment facility.

Sweet said the project –a containment wharf built to encompass the number one toxic location in the Great Lakes – will take seven years to complete. He said it’s his understanding barges will be in the water for the project this fall.

“I don’t see why the government would change it,” he said. “When it’s done, it will be one of the gems in the City of Hamilton’s crown to make the waterfront a world-class place to be.”

He added it’s also his understanding that US Steel recommitted last week to supplying the steel for the wharf.

In terms of the size of the new riding, Sweet admitted there will be some challenges.

“We’ll still try to offer what we call ‘gold seal’ constituency advocacy,” he said. “The breadth and scope of the riding is going to (be) a little bit more of a challenge.”

“I mean, if you go from Burlington to Tapleytown-Vineland, it’s just a huge, huge riding – it’s even worse if you follow the outside perimeter of the riding,” Sweet added. “But those challenges we’ll try to deal with.

“Our office in Greensville isn’t central anymore – it was central to ADFW – so we’ll look at options in that regard.”

Sweet reflects on election, sitting in Opposition and the challenges serving new Flamborough-Glanbrook riding

News Nov 02, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Newly-elected Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet spoke to the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce Oct. 28, sharing his thoughts on the election and working as a member of the Official Opposition.

Sweet, who served as the MP for the now-defunct Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding since 2006, had always sat as a government member.

“My party finds itself in a situation where we are now in Opposition,” he said at a lunchtime business roundtable at Harry Howell Arena. “Now our responsibility is to hold the government to account, to use every tool we can to not only publicly, and through the media, hold them to account in the House, but to also make sure we get the word out to constituents about any concerns that we have that they should have.”

Sweet noted being on the Opposition bench could be a learning process for him, but said he doesn’t intend to change his message from the campaign.

“I’m profoundly concerned about the tax increases that Mr. Trudeau is talking about, the payroll tax increases that are going to affect you,” he said. “I’m concerned about the elimination of income splitting for families – they’ve assured seniors that they’re going to retain it, we’ll see how that goes.

“I’m also concerned about the military and the kind of spending cuts that will occur there.”

Despite being in Opposition, Sweet said he’ll still be a strong voice for constituents.

“Our constituency office doors are always open,” he said. “We’ll be glad to help with any circumstance.”

Sweet said his staff understands many constituents often aren’t sure what issues fall under municipal, provincial or federal jurisdiction.

Sweet noted his office has a good working relationship with Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin’s office, as well as Ward 14 councillor Robert Pasuta and Ward 15 councillor Judi Partridge.

“It’s a one-stop shop for you, if you want to call us and we’ll try to get you to the right resource to fix your problem.”

While noting the FCC is fiercly non-partisan, executive director Arend Kerstern said the Chamber has enjoyed wonderful relationship with Sweet during his time in office.

Sweet noted the Chamber hosted two debates and thanked them for their efforts.

In the days ahead, Sweet said the Conservative Party will be appointing an interim leader, before developing a process to elect a permanent party leader.

“In regards to our party, I’m very hopeful that those things will be worked out rather effectively and transparently and with integrity,” he said, noting the interim leader is expected to be selected Nov, 5 at the party’s caucus meeting.

He noted the election was a late night – adding Liberal candidate Jennifer Stebbing called him to concede around 11:30 p.m.

Sweet said party polling had shown the race was going to be close, but said the party thought it would be a minority government.

Partridge asked Sweet about the status of the Randle Reef project, in light of the government change and US Steel’s uncertainty. US Steel is contributing $37 million in steel to the containment facility.

Sweet said the project –a containment wharf built to encompass the number one toxic location in the Great Lakes – will take seven years to complete. He said it’s his understanding barges will be in the water for the project this fall.

“I don’t see why the government would change it,” he said. “When it’s done, it will be one of the gems in the City of Hamilton’s crown to make the waterfront a world-class place to be.”

He added it’s also his understanding that US Steel recommitted last week to supplying the steel for the wharf.

In terms of the size of the new riding, Sweet admitted there will be some challenges.

“We’ll still try to offer what we call ‘gold seal’ constituency advocacy,” he said. “The breadth and scope of the riding is going to (be) a little bit more of a challenge.”

“I mean, if you go from Burlington to Tapleytown-Vineland, it’s just a huge, huge riding – it’s even worse if you follow the outside perimeter of the riding,” Sweet added. “But those challenges we’ll try to deal with.

“Our office in Greensville isn’t central anymore – it was central to ADFW – so we’ll look at options in that regard.”

Sweet reflects on election, sitting in Opposition and the challenges serving new Flamborough-Glanbrook riding

News Nov 02, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Newly-elected Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet spoke to the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce Oct. 28, sharing his thoughts on the election and working as a member of the Official Opposition.

Sweet, who served as the MP for the now-defunct Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding since 2006, had always sat as a government member.

“My party finds itself in a situation where we are now in Opposition,” he said at a lunchtime business roundtable at Harry Howell Arena. “Now our responsibility is to hold the government to account, to use every tool we can to not only publicly, and through the media, hold them to account in the House, but to also make sure we get the word out to constituents about any concerns that we have that they should have.”

Sweet noted being on the Opposition bench could be a learning process for him, but said he doesn’t intend to change his message from the campaign.

“I’m profoundly concerned about the tax increases that Mr. Trudeau is talking about, the payroll tax increases that are going to affect you,” he said. “I’m concerned about the elimination of income splitting for families – they’ve assured seniors that they’re going to retain it, we’ll see how that goes.

“I’m also concerned about the military and the kind of spending cuts that will occur there.”

Despite being in Opposition, Sweet said he’ll still be a strong voice for constituents.

“Our constituency office doors are always open,” he said. “We’ll be glad to help with any circumstance.”

Sweet said his staff understands many constituents often aren’t sure what issues fall under municipal, provincial or federal jurisdiction.

Sweet noted his office has a good working relationship with Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin’s office, as well as Ward 14 councillor Robert Pasuta and Ward 15 councillor Judi Partridge.

“It’s a one-stop shop for you, if you want to call us and we’ll try to get you to the right resource to fix your problem.”

While noting the FCC is fiercly non-partisan, executive director Arend Kerstern said the Chamber has enjoyed wonderful relationship with Sweet during his time in office.

Sweet noted the Chamber hosted two debates and thanked them for their efforts.

In the days ahead, Sweet said the Conservative Party will be appointing an interim leader, before developing a process to elect a permanent party leader.

“In regards to our party, I’m very hopeful that those things will be worked out rather effectively and transparently and with integrity,” he said, noting the interim leader is expected to be selected Nov, 5 at the party’s caucus meeting.

He noted the election was a late night – adding Liberal candidate Jennifer Stebbing called him to concede around 11:30 p.m.

Sweet said party polling had shown the race was going to be close, but said the party thought it would be a minority government.

Partridge asked Sweet about the status of the Randle Reef project, in light of the government change and US Steel’s uncertainty. US Steel is contributing $37 million in steel to the containment facility.

Sweet said the project –a containment wharf built to encompass the number one toxic location in the Great Lakes – will take seven years to complete. He said it’s his understanding barges will be in the water for the project this fall.

“I don’t see why the government would change it,” he said. “When it’s done, it will be one of the gems in the City of Hamilton’s crown to make the waterfront a world-class place to be.”

He added it’s also his understanding that US Steel recommitted last week to supplying the steel for the wharf.

In terms of the size of the new riding, Sweet admitted there will be some challenges.

“We’ll still try to offer what we call ‘gold seal’ constituency advocacy,” he said. “The breadth and scope of the riding is going to (be) a little bit more of a challenge.”

“I mean, if you go from Burlington to Tapleytown-Vineland, it’s just a huge, huge riding – it’s even worse if you follow the outside perimeter of the riding,” Sweet added. “But those challenges we’ll try to deal with.

“Our office in Greensville isn’t central anymore – it was central to ADFW – so we’ll look at options in that regard.”