Clairmont: A mind boggling tour of digital evidence at Bosma trial

News Mar 03, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

It may be the exact moment when the lives of Tim Bosma and his killers collided.

May 3, 2013, 8:28 p.m.

At that instant, someone accessed the ad Tim posted on AutoTrader to sell his diesel Dodge Ram pickup.

Tim would have been oblivious to this, of course. Completely, absolutely unaware that his truck was luring his killers close.

Who knows what Tim was even doing at that moment. His widow, Sharlene, has said her lanky, lovable guy liked to tuck their little girl into bed in their Ancaster dream home, stretching the giggly ritual out as long as possible. Perhaps afterward the two of them talked, again, about having another child. And another after that. And maybe they had a few beers. It was a Friday night, after all.

Whoever looked at that ad for four minutes that night did so on a computer later seized from Dellen Millard's house. A computer that contained satellite photos of Millard's farm, an invoice from Millard's mom and a property listing agreement between Millard and Re/Max. A computer with a Skype account for "Dellen Millard" and an iPhone backup for "Dell."

Also on that computer was a gaming program called Steam, and a user account called "Say 10," just like it says on a hat Mark Smich wears.

Buried in five computer devices seized from Millard's Etobicoke home by homicide investigators are a stunning number of images and documents that bring the worlds of Millard and Smich terrifyingly close to Tim, who was just trying to sell his albatross of a truck.

On May 6, 2013, Tim, 32, took two men for a test drive of that truck. He never came home. The Crown believes Smich, 28, and Millard, 30, shot him in his truck and burned his body in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

Millard and Smich are on trial for first-degree murder.

On Wednesday, the massive amount of evidence presented by Crown witness Det. Sgt. Jim Falconer, a retired OPP forensic computer expert, was mind boggling.

With the guidance of assistant Crown attorney Brett Moodie, he led the jury through the browser histories, data files and passwords of three desktop computers (one of which contained a Jan. 20, 2013 backup file for "Mark's iPad"), one laptop and one USB hard drive.

By doing so, Falconer was essentially giving us a tour of the lives of Millard and Smich.

We learn someone was repeatedly searching online for used Dodge Ram trucks, beginning in November 2012. They checked Toronto first, then eventually expanded the search to anything in a 100-kilometre radius of Millard's home.

We get to know the girlfriends. There are photos of Marlena Meneses kissing Smich. Wearing a pushup bra in provocative selfies. Holding a beer bottle. A laptop found in Millard's bedroom contains Christina Noudga's resume and homework for her human physiology class at York University. Her nickname, it seems, is Kinks.

We see file names in "DellsHard/Pictures" folder (a tawdry double-entendre) such as: skydiving; offroad; badHair; blunt fiction; shrooms; autoshow; dodgeVan; jeepParts; licenseplates.

And we see the accused in many images. Millard with various hair styles posing in planes and cars. A 2009 headshot of him from a dating website with the words: "Hi there, my name is Evan." Smich in a backyard, mugging for the camera. Cuddling his girlfriend.

We see, in DellsHard/Pictures, a screen grab from a video showing The Eliminator, towed by an SUV in the Millard's aviation hangar.

And we see guns.

A hand, holding a handgun in a photo from Mark's iPad backup. And another, from an image found in DellsHard/Pictures. A photo of the same gun was texted to Noudga.

All these lives, intertwining, spiralling. While Tim waits eagerly for the right person to see his truck.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont

Clairmont: A mind boggling tour of digital evidence at Bosma trial

News Mar 03, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

It may be the exact moment when the lives of Tim Bosma and his killers collided.

May 3, 2013, 8:28 p.m.

At that instant, someone accessed the ad Tim posted on AutoTrader to sell his diesel Dodge Ram pickup.

Tim would have been oblivious to this, of course. Completely, absolutely unaware that his truck was luring his killers close.

Who knows what Tim was even doing at that moment. His widow, Sharlene, has said her lanky, lovable guy liked to tuck their little girl into bed in their Ancaster dream home, stretching the giggly ritual out as long as possible. Perhaps afterward the two of them talked, again, about having another child. And another after that. And maybe they had a few beers. It was a Friday night, after all.

Whoever looked at that ad for four minutes that night did so on a computer later seized from Dellen Millard's house. A computer that contained satellite photos of Millard's farm, an invoice from Millard's mom and a property listing agreement between Millard and Re/Max. A computer with a Skype account for "Dellen Millard" and an iPhone backup for "Dell."

Also on that computer was a gaming program called Steam, and a user account called "Say 10," just like it says on a hat Mark Smich wears.

Buried in five computer devices seized from Millard's Etobicoke home by homicide investigators are a stunning number of images and documents that bring the worlds of Millard and Smich terrifyingly close to Tim, who was just trying to sell his albatross of a truck.

On May 6, 2013, Tim, 32, took two men for a test drive of that truck. He never came home. The Crown believes Smich, 28, and Millard, 30, shot him in his truck and burned his body in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

Millard and Smich are on trial for first-degree murder.

On Wednesday, the massive amount of evidence presented by Crown witness Det. Sgt. Jim Falconer, a retired OPP forensic computer expert, was mind boggling.

With the guidance of assistant Crown attorney Brett Moodie, he led the jury through the browser histories, data files and passwords of three desktop computers (one of which contained a Jan. 20, 2013 backup file for "Mark's iPad"), one laptop and one USB hard drive.

By doing so, Falconer was essentially giving us a tour of the lives of Millard and Smich.

We learn someone was repeatedly searching online for used Dodge Ram trucks, beginning in November 2012. They checked Toronto first, then eventually expanded the search to anything in a 100-kilometre radius of Millard's home.

We get to know the girlfriends. There are photos of Marlena Meneses kissing Smich. Wearing a pushup bra in provocative selfies. Holding a beer bottle. A laptop found in Millard's bedroom contains Christina Noudga's resume and homework for her human physiology class at York University. Her nickname, it seems, is Kinks.

We see file names in "DellsHard/Pictures" folder (a tawdry double-entendre) such as: skydiving; offroad; badHair; blunt fiction; shrooms; autoshow; dodgeVan; jeepParts; licenseplates.

And we see the accused in many images. Millard with various hair styles posing in planes and cars. A 2009 headshot of him from a dating website with the words: "Hi there, my name is Evan." Smich in a backyard, mugging for the camera. Cuddling his girlfriend.

We see, in DellsHard/Pictures, a screen grab from a video showing The Eliminator, towed by an SUV in the Millard's aviation hangar.

And we see guns.

A hand, holding a handgun in a photo from Mark's iPad backup. And another, from an image found in DellsHard/Pictures. A photo of the same gun was texted to Noudga.

All these lives, intertwining, spiralling. While Tim waits eagerly for the right person to see his truck.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont

Clairmont: A mind boggling tour of digital evidence at Bosma trial

News Mar 03, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

It may be the exact moment when the lives of Tim Bosma and his killers collided.

May 3, 2013, 8:28 p.m.

At that instant, someone accessed the ad Tim posted on AutoTrader to sell his diesel Dodge Ram pickup.

Tim would have been oblivious to this, of course. Completely, absolutely unaware that his truck was luring his killers close.

Who knows what Tim was even doing at that moment. His widow, Sharlene, has said her lanky, lovable guy liked to tuck their little girl into bed in their Ancaster dream home, stretching the giggly ritual out as long as possible. Perhaps afterward the two of them talked, again, about having another child. And another after that. And maybe they had a few beers. It was a Friday night, after all.

Whoever looked at that ad for four minutes that night did so on a computer later seized from Dellen Millard's house. A computer that contained satellite photos of Millard's farm, an invoice from Millard's mom and a property listing agreement between Millard and Re/Max. A computer with a Skype account for "Dellen Millard" and an iPhone backup for "Dell."

Also on that computer was a gaming program called Steam, and a user account called "Say 10," just like it says on a hat Mark Smich wears.

Buried in five computer devices seized from Millard's Etobicoke home by homicide investigators are a stunning number of images and documents that bring the worlds of Millard and Smich terrifyingly close to Tim, who was just trying to sell his albatross of a truck.

On May 6, 2013, Tim, 32, took two men for a test drive of that truck. He never came home. The Crown believes Smich, 28, and Millard, 30, shot him in his truck and burned his body in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

Millard and Smich are on trial for first-degree murder.

On Wednesday, the massive amount of evidence presented by Crown witness Det. Sgt. Jim Falconer, a retired OPP forensic computer expert, was mind boggling.

With the guidance of assistant Crown attorney Brett Moodie, he led the jury through the browser histories, data files and passwords of three desktop computers (one of which contained a Jan. 20, 2013 backup file for "Mark's iPad"), one laptop and one USB hard drive.

By doing so, Falconer was essentially giving us a tour of the lives of Millard and Smich.

We learn someone was repeatedly searching online for used Dodge Ram trucks, beginning in November 2012. They checked Toronto first, then eventually expanded the search to anything in a 100-kilometre radius of Millard's home.

We get to know the girlfriends. There are photos of Marlena Meneses kissing Smich. Wearing a pushup bra in provocative selfies. Holding a beer bottle. A laptop found in Millard's bedroom contains Christina Noudga's resume and homework for her human physiology class at York University. Her nickname, it seems, is Kinks.

We see file names in "DellsHard/Pictures" folder (a tawdry double-entendre) such as: skydiving; offroad; badHair; blunt fiction; shrooms; autoshow; dodgeVan; jeepParts; licenseplates.

And we see the accused in many images. Millard with various hair styles posing in planes and cars. A 2009 headshot of him from a dating website with the words: "Hi there, my name is Evan." Smich in a backyard, mugging for the camera. Cuddling his girlfriend.

We see, in DellsHard/Pictures, a screen grab from a video showing The Eliminator, towed by an SUV in the Millard's aviation hangar.

And we see guns.

A hand, holding a handgun in a photo from Mark's iPad backup. And another, from an image found in DellsHard/Pictures. A photo of the same gun was texted to Noudga.

All these lives, intertwining, spiralling. While Tim waits eagerly for the right person to see his truck.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont