Bosma trial: Shell casing mystery

News Mar 04, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

The shell casing was found under the back passenger seat in Tim Bosma's pickup truck — but where did it come from?

That was a burning question Thursday at the trial of two men accused in the Ancaster dad's slaying. Did it land right where police found it, or did it roll?

The jury has heard that when Sharlene Bosma watched her husband pull out of their driveway on May 6, 2013 — with two men who'd come to test drive the pickup truck he was selling online — he was in the front passenger seat.

The taller of the two men — whom she described as outgoing and confident — was behind the wheel, and the second man — described as "sketchy" — sat in the back.

Tim Bosma never returned. The Crown says he was shot in his truck that night, his body then burned in an incinerator outside a Waterloo Region airport hangar owned by Dellen Millard.

Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for first-degree murder.

The jury has already heard in this trial that a single bullet casing — stamped WIN .380 AUTO — was discovered by a police investigator below the flipped-up back passenger seats.

Shell casing found in Tim Bosma’s truck. Court exhibit

On the stand Thursday, retired Halton Police identification officer David Banks recalled that the casing hadn't been there during investigators' first sweep of the truck.

Det. Const. Laura McLellan — who was also part of that examination team — testified about those findings last month, but because it was Banks who had physically taken the notes that day (McLellan was responsible for evidence photography) it was decided that he should be called in to testify as well.

The main question put to him — from both Millard and Smich's teams — was about the hypothetical origin and movement of that casing in the truck.

Nadir Sachak, co-counsel for Millard, presented photos of the truck cab, pointing out grooves and recesses and humps on the floor. Those would be barriers for any object hypothetically rolling around and could prevent them from moving too far, he suggested.

Banks agreed.

When Smich's lawyer Thomas Dungey took the floor, he suggested the exact opposite — that the casing could have easily rolled from the front seat to the back seat during transportation.

Again, Banks agreed that is possible.

A large chunk of the truck's cab had been gutted, the jury knows.

The front seats had been removed, and the charred metal frame of burned seats was found inside the trailer alongside the truck. There was corn husk stuck in that frame, Banks testified Thursday.

Corn husk stuck to the charred seat frame found in the trailer in which Tim Bosma’s truck was found. Court exhibit

Two "burn sites" were found by police in a corn field on Millard's Ayr farm — near a wooded laneway where The Eliminator (the 6,000-pound animal incinerator the Crown says was used to burn Bosma's body) was found.

Three seatbelt buckles were recovered from those burn sites.

A blood spatter expert also took the stand Thursday to give his analysis of how blood ended up on the underside of Tim Bosma's truck — which he says was the result of a cleanup.

Sgt. Robert Jones, a bloodstain pattern analyst with Waterloo Regional Police, gave the jury a primer on the different bloodstain patterns and the science behind how each is formed.

In this case, he identified hundreds of patterns on various parts of the undercarriage of the truck.

Based on the direction and shape of each stain — and the fact that there are no stains from the passenger door going forward — Jones believes the blood was the result of the spray from a pressure washer or hose, shot up under the truck on an angle from somewhere around the front passenger door.

Jones said some of that diluted blood flow, dripping as it dried, was then whipped back along the undercarriage of the truck as it drove.

"So a cleanup followed by a drive could create these patterns?" asked assistant Crown attorney Tony Leitch.

Yes, Jones said: "one scenario basically created the second scenario."

He'll be back on the stand Monday when the trial continues.

News services

Bosma trial: Shell casing mystery

News Mar 04, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

The shell casing was found under the back passenger seat in Tim Bosma's pickup truck — but where did it come from?

That was a burning question Thursday at the trial of two men accused in the Ancaster dad's slaying. Did it land right where police found it, or did it roll?

The jury has heard that when Sharlene Bosma watched her husband pull out of their driveway on May 6, 2013 — with two men who'd come to test drive the pickup truck he was selling online — he was in the front passenger seat.

The taller of the two men — whom she described as outgoing and confident — was behind the wheel, and the second man — described as "sketchy" — sat in the back.

Tim Bosma never returned. The Crown says he was shot in his truck that night, his body then burned in an incinerator outside a Waterloo Region airport hangar owned by Dellen Millard.

Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for first-degree murder.

The jury has already heard in this trial that a single bullet casing — stamped WIN .380 AUTO — was discovered by a police investigator below the flipped-up back passenger seats.

Shell casing found in Tim Bosma’s truck. Court exhibit

On the stand Thursday, retired Halton Police identification officer David Banks recalled that the casing hadn't been there during investigators' first sweep of the truck.

Det. Const. Laura McLellan — who was also part of that examination team — testified about those findings last month, but because it was Banks who had physically taken the notes that day (McLellan was responsible for evidence photography) it was decided that he should be called in to testify as well.

The main question put to him — from both Millard and Smich's teams — was about the hypothetical origin and movement of that casing in the truck.

Nadir Sachak, co-counsel for Millard, presented photos of the truck cab, pointing out grooves and recesses and humps on the floor. Those would be barriers for any object hypothetically rolling around and could prevent them from moving too far, he suggested.

Banks agreed.

When Smich's lawyer Thomas Dungey took the floor, he suggested the exact opposite — that the casing could have easily rolled from the front seat to the back seat during transportation.

Again, Banks agreed that is possible.

A large chunk of the truck's cab had been gutted, the jury knows.

The front seats had been removed, and the charred metal frame of burned seats was found inside the trailer alongside the truck. There was corn husk stuck in that frame, Banks testified Thursday.

Corn husk stuck to the charred seat frame found in the trailer in which Tim Bosma’s truck was found. Court exhibit

Two "burn sites" were found by police in a corn field on Millard's Ayr farm — near a wooded laneway where The Eliminator (the 6,000-pound animal incinerator the Crown says was used to burn Bosma's body) was found.

Three seatbelt buckles were recovered from those burn sites.

A blood spatter expert also took the stand Thursday to give his analysis of how blood ended up on the underside of Tim Bosma's truck — which he says was the result of a cleanup.

Sgt. Robert Jones, a bloodstain pattern analyst with Waterloo Regional Police, gave the jury a primer on the different bloodstain patterns and the science behind how each is formed.

In this case, he identified hundreds of patterns on various parts of the undercarriage of the truck.

Based on the direction and shape of each stain — and the fact that there are no stains from the passenger door going forward — Jones believes the blood was the result of the spray from a pressure washer or hose, shot up under the truck on an angle from somewhere around the front passenger door.

Jones said some of that diluted blood flow, dripping as it dried, was then whipped back along the undercarriage of the truck as it drove.

"So a cleanup followed by a drive could create these patterns?" asked assistant Crown attorney Tony Leitch.

Yes, Jones said: "one scenario basically created the second scenario."

He'll be back on the stand Monday when the trial continues.

News services

Bosma trial: Shell casing mystery

News Mar 04, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

The shell casing was found under the back passenger seat in Tim Bosma's pickup truck — but where did it come from?

That was a burning question Thursday at the trial of two men accused in the Ancaster dad's slaying. Did it land right where police found it, or did it roll?

The jury has heard that when Sharlene Bosma watched her husband pull out of their driveway on May 6, 2013 — with two men who'd come to test drive the pickup truck he was selling online — he was in the front passenger seat.

The taller of the two men — whom she described as outgoing and confident — was behind the wheel, and the second man — described as "sketchy" — sat in the back.

Tim Bosma never returned. The Crown says he was shot in his truck that night, his body then burned in an incinerator outside a Waterloo Region airport hangar owned by Dellen Millard.

Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for first-degree murder.

The jury has already heard in this trial that a single bullet casing — stamped WIN .380 AUTO — was discovered by a police investigator below the flipped-up back passenger seats.

Shell casing found in Tim Bosma’s truck. Court exhibit

On the stand Thursday, retired Halton Police identification officer David Banks recalled that the casing hadn't been there during investigators' first sweep of the truck.

Det. Const. Laura McLellan — who was also part of that examination team — testified about those findings last month, but because it was Banks who had physically taken the notes that day (McLellan was responsible for evidence photography) it was decided that he should be called in to testify as well.

The main question put to him — from both Millard and Smich's teams — was about the hypothetical origin and movement of that casing in the truck.

Nadir Sachak, co-counsel for Millard, presented photos of the truck cab, pointing out grooves and recesses and humps on the floor. Those would be barriers for any object hypothetically rolling around and could prevent them from moving too far, he suggested.

Banks agreed.

When Smich's lawyer Thomas Dungey took the floor, he suggested the exact opposite — that the casing could have easily rolled from the front seat to the back seat during transportation.

Again, Banks agreed that is possible.

A large chunk of the truck's cab had been gutted, the jury knows.

The front seats had been removed, and the charred metal frame of burned seats was found inside the trailer alongside the truck. There was corn husk stuck in that frame, Banks testified Thursday.

Corn husk stuck to the charred seat frame found in the trailer in which Tim Bosma’s truck was found. Court exhibit

Two "burn sites" were found by police in a corn field on Millard's Ayr farm — near a wooded laneway where The Eliminator (the 6,000-pound animal incinerator the Crown says was used to burn Bosma's body) was found.

Three seatbelt buckles were recovered from those burn sites.

A blood spatter expert also took the stand Thursday to give his analysis of how blood ended up on the underside of Tim Bosma's truck — which he says was the result of a cleanup.

Sgt. Robert Jones, a bloodstain pattern analyst with Waterloo Regional Police, gave the jury a primer on the different bloodstain patterns and the science behind how each is formed.

In this case, he identified hundreds of patterns on various parts of the undercarriage of the truck.

Based on the direction and shape of each stain — and the fact that there are no stains from the passenger door going forward — Jones believes the blood was the result of the spray from a pressure washer or hose, shot up under the truck on an angle from somewhere around the front passenger door.

Jones said some of that diluted blood flow, dripping as it dried, was then whipped back along the undercarriage of the truck as it drove.

"So a cleanup followed by a drive could create these patterns?" asked assistant Crown attorney Tony Leitch.

Yes, Jones said: "one scenario basically created the second scenario."

He'll be back on the stand Monday when the trial continues.

News services