Hamiltonians turn off the lights for Earth Hour

News Mar 20, 2016 Hamilton Spectator

Electricity demand was down 1.3 per cent in Hamilton during Earth Hour, reports Horizon Utilities Corporation.

It might not sound like much, but the reduction is equivalent to powering 291 homes for a 24-hour period.

"I'm encouraged by the community's participation during Earth Hour," said Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger in a statement. "My hope is that everyone takes the next step and considers simple changes to daily routines that add up to positive energy savings."

The decrease of 7 megawatts between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday as Hamiltonians powered down for the annual Earth Hour event was slightly improved from last year.

Electricity demand went down by about 1 per cent in 2015 as participants shut off electronics, appliances and lights to spend one hour in the dark.

"We appreciate the ongoing support of our customers and the City of Hamilton for participating in Earth Hour to raise community awareness about the importance of environmental sustainability," said Max Cananzi, President and CEO of Horizon Utilities. "Events such as Earth Hour will continue to inspire residents and businesses to be more energy conscious and to look for ways to conserve electricity every day and every hour."

Earth Hour created by the World Wildlife Fund aims to get homes and businesses to turn off their lights for one hour a year to raise awareness about climate change. Making small adjustments to the amount of power consumed each day is one way to slow the rate of global warming.

The Spectator was among local businesses participating in the event by turning off all non-essential lights.

For more information about Earth Hour and energy conservation tips, visit horizonutilities.com or earthhour.org/canada.

Hamiltonians turn off the lights for Earth Hour

News Mar 20, 2016 Hamilton Spectator

Electricity demand was down 1.3 per cent in Hamilton during Earth Hour, reports Horizon Utilities Corporation.

It might not sound like much, but the reduction is equivalent to powering 291 homes for a 24-hour period.

"I'm encouraged by the community's participation during Earth Hour," said Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger in a statement. "My hope is that everyone takes the next step and considers simple changes to daily routines that add up to positive energy savings."

The decrease of 7 megawatts between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday as Hamiltonians powered down for the annual Earth Hour event was slightly improved from last year.

Electricity demand went down by about 1 per cent in 2015 as participants shut off electronics, appliances and lights to spend one hour in the dark.

"We appreciate the ongoing support of our customers and the City of Hamilton for participating in Earth Hour to raise community awareness about the importance of environmental sustainability," said Max Cananzi, President and CEO of Horizon Utilities. "Events such as Earth Hour will continue to inspire residents and businesses to be more energy conscious and to look for ways to conserve electricity every day and every hour."

Earth Hour created by the World Wildlife Fund aims to get homes and businesses to turn off their lights for one hour a year to raise awareness about climate change. Making small adjustments to the amount of power consumed each day is one way to slow the rate of global warming.

The Spectator was among local businesses participating in the event by turning off all non-essential lights.

For more information about Earth Hour and energy conservation tips, visit horizonutilities.com or earthhour.org/canada.

Hamiltonians turn off the lights for Earth Hour

News Mar 20, 2016 Hamilton Spectator

Electricity demand was down 1.3 per cent in Hamilton during Earth Hour, reports Horizon Utilities Corporation.

It might not sound like much, but the reduction is equivalent to powering 291 homes for a 24-hour period.

"I'm encouraged by the community's participation during Earth Hour," said Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger in a statement. "My hope is that everyone takes the next step and considers simple changes to daily routines that add up to positive energy savings."

The decrease of 7 megawatts between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday as Hamiltonians powered down for the annual Earth Hour event was slightly improved from last year.

Electricity demand went down by about 1 per cent in 2015 as participants shut off electronics, appliances and lights to spend one hour in the dark.

"We appreciate the ongoing support of our customers and the City of Hamilton for participating in Earth Hour to raise community awareness about the importance of environmental sustainability," said Max Cananzi, President and CEO of Horizon Utilities. "Events such as Earth Hour will continue to inspire residents and businesses to be more energy conscious and to look for ways to conserve electricity every day and every hour."

Earth Hour created by the World Wildlife Fund aims to get homes and businesses to turn off their lights for one hour a year to raise awareness about climate change. Making small adjustments to the amount of power consumed each day is one way to slow the rate of global warming.

The Spectator was among local businesses participating in the event by turning off all non-essential lights.

For more information about Earth Hour and energy conservation tips, visit horizonutilities.com or earthhour.org/canada.