Reaction to Rob Ford’s death: ‘He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy’

News Mar 22, 2016 by Robin Levinson King OurWindsor.Ca

Former Toronto mayor Rob Ford may have had his share of scandals, but local politicians say he should be remembered as a man devoted to his city.

Ford died Tuesday in Mount Sinai Hospital at age 46 after battling cancer since 2014.

With an ashen face but dry eyes, Ford’s brother Doug hugged and thanked a supporter in the hospital lobby around noon. Moments later, he drove away from the hospital in a black Lincoln Navigator without answering questions from the media.

Ford’s mother Diane, sister Kathy and nephew Michael walked from the hospital to the parking garage across the street shortly after noon without making any comment to waiting reporters.

Flags at city hall, Metro Hall and the city’s civic centres will fly at half mast to mark Ford’s passing and will remain there until after his funeral, city officials said.

Mayor John Tory said the city was “reeling” with the news, and expressed his sympathies for the close-knit Ford clan.

“I have known Rob Ford for many years. He was a man who spoke his mind and who ran for office because of the deeply felt convictions that he had. As a councillor, mayor and private citizen, Rob Ford reached out directly to people across the city with a phone call, an offer of advice or support, and I know there are many who were affected by his gregarious nature and approach to public service,” Tory said in a statement.

“His time in City Hall included moments of kindness, of generosity to his council colleagues and real efforts to do what he thought was best for Toronto. He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy whose presence in our city will be missed.”

“Uncle Rob, You have fought the good fight long enough and now can rest in peace. Love you and will forever miss you,” wrote Michael Ford, a Toronto District School Board trustee, on Twitter.

Norm Kelly, who served as Ford’s deputy mayor – and temporarily took over his duties when Ford stepped aside to receive addiction treatment – said he hopes Ford will be remembered for his devotion to the city.

“My hope is that Torontonians will remember Rob Ford for his accomplishments and unswerving dedication to our city,” he said on Twitter.

“My deepest condolences go out to his family and his children. Having lived through this moment, I can have an appreciation for what they’re feeling and I hope that they find peace in this loss,” said Councillor Mike Layton said, referring to the cancer-related death of his father Jack in 2011. “He’ll certainly be missed on the floor of council.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged Ford’s death following a news conference condemning Tuesday’s terror attacks in Brussels.

“My heart goes out to his wife Renata and his two young children. My thoughts are also with the entire family,” Trudeau said.

Premier Kathleen Wynne, who had her share of political disagreements with Ford, paused during question period at Queen’s Park to acknowledge the news about the former mayor as it spread among MPPs in the chamber.

“I just want to express the sadness of this legislature,” she said in a sombre tone, noting that MPPs would hold a moment of silence in tribute to Ford before the lunch break.

“You have been a leader, you have inspired and you never accepted no for an answer. You’ve taught us how city hall should run and you’ve taught us how to fight and you've taught us how to win, and you've always done it with dignity,” said Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti, before heading to Nathan Phillips Square to write a tribute in chalk.

“You have fought your demons and taught all of us on how to fight those demons and win and I personally will miss the hell out of Rob Ford at city hall.”

Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader Patrick Brown recalled meeting Ford when he was 22 and running for city council.

“Rob Ford was passionate about people and public service. I always appreciated that he was unscripted and sincere. He responded to constituent phone calls like no other politician, and vigorously defended the taxpayer. Rob Ford redefined how municipal campaigns were run in the City of Toronto,” he said in a statement.

“My heart, thoughts and prayers are with the entire Ford family during this difficult period.

“Rob Ford earned widespread respect for his unwavering persistence in the face of serious health concerns — which he summed up in a statement released from his hospital bed during the 2014 campaign: ‘Be strong, stay positive and never, ever give up.’”

 

While serving as city councilor and mayor, Ford was a divisive figure who drew both enthusiastic support and significant criticism from the public.

Dave MacKinnon, 45, was reading the breaking news on his laptop in the hospital lobby Tuesday morning.

“I thought he was politically horrible, but you could never wish this on anybody,” MacKinnon said.

He expressed the conflicting emotions tugging at many Torontonians.

“I have no love for Ford the politician ... but this is a pretty horrendous, awful thing for any family to deal with.”

Ford’s reputation extended far beyond Toronto and the mayor’s death made headlines worldwide.

In the U.S., Ford was remembered less for his political record and more for a video which showed the then-mayor smoking crack. American tabloid news site TMZ announced his death with the headline “Rob Ford ‘Crack Mayor’ Dead at 46,” while the New York Times sent a breaking news alert notifying its readers that the “controversial ex-mayor” was dead.

 

Jimmy Kimmel, who interviewed the mayor on his late-night talk show, tweeted out his condolences.

“Condolences to the family and fans of @TorontoRobFord - an unforgettable guy who loved his job and city like few men I've met,” he wrote on Twitter.

With files from Jennifer Pagliaro, Betsy Powel, Chris Reynolds, David Rider and Jackie Hong

Toronto Star

Reaction to Rob Ford’s death: ‘He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy’

John Tory and Kathleen Wynne are among those paying tribute to the former Toronto mayor, who died today at age 46.

News Mar 22, 2016 by Robin Levinson King OurWindsor.Ca

Former Toronto mayor Rob Ford may have had his share of scandals, but local politicians say he should be remembered as a man devoted to his city.

Ford died Tuesday in Mount Sinai Hospital at age 46 after battling cancer since 2014.

With an ashen face but dry eyes, Ford’s brother Doug hugged and thanked a supporter in the hospital lobby around noon. Moments later, he drove away from the hospital in a black Lincoln Navigator without answering questions from the media.

Ford’s mother Diane, sister Kathy and nephew Michael walked from the hospital to the parking garage across the street shortly after noon without making any comment to waiting reporters.

Related Content

Flags at city hall, Metro Hall and the city’s civic centres will fly at half mast to mark Ford’s passing and will remain there until after his funeral, city officials said.

Mayor John Tory said the city was “reeling” with the news, and expressed his sympathies for the close-knit Ford clan.

“I have known Rob Ford for many years. He was a man who spoke his mind and who ran for office because of the deeply felt convictions that he had. As a councillor, mayor and private citizen, Rob Ford reached out directly to people across the city with a phone call, an offer of advice or support, and I know there are many who were affected by his gregarious nature and approach to public service,” Tory said in a statement.

“His time in City Hall included moments of kindness, of generosity to his council colleagues and real efforts to do what he thought was best for Toronto. He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy whose presence in our city will be missed.”

“Uncle Rob, You have fought the good fight long enough and now can rest in peace. Love you and will forever miss you,” wrote Michael Ford, a Toronto District School Board trustee, on Twitter.

Norm Kelly, who served as Ford’s deputy mayor – and temporarily took over his duties when Ford stepped aside to receive addiction treatment – said he hopes Ford will be remembered for his devotion to the city.

“My hope is that Torontonians will remember Rob Ford for his accomplishments and unswerving dedication to our city,” he said on Twitter.

“My deepest condolences go out to his family and his children. Having lived through this moment, I can have an appreciation for what they’re feeling and I hope that they find peace in this loss,” said Councillor Mike Layton said, referring to the cancer-related death of his father Jack in 2011. “He’ll certainly be missed on the floor of council.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged Ford’s death following a news conference condemning Tuesday’s terror attacks in Brussels.

“My heart goes out to his wife Renata and his two young children. My thoughts are also with the entire family,” Trudeau said.

Premier Kathleen Wynne, who had her share of political disagreements with Ford, paused during question period at Queen’s Park to acknowledge the news about the former mayor as it spread among MPPs in the chamber.

“I just want to express the sadness of this legislature,” she said in a sombre tone, noting that MPPs would hold a moment of silence in tribute to Ford before the lunch break.

“You have been a leader, you have inspired and you never accepted no for an answer. You’ve taught us how city hall should run and you’ve taught us how to fight and you've taught us how to win, and you've always done it with dignity,” said Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti, before heading to Nathan Phillips Square to write a tribute in chalk.

“You have fought your demons and taught all of us on how to fight those demons and win and I personally will miss the hell out of Rob Ford at city hall.”

Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader Patrick Brown recalled meeting Ford when he was 22 and running for city council.

“Rob Ford was passionate about people and public service. I always appreciated that he was unscripted and sincere. He responded to constituent phone calls like no other politician, and vigorously defended the taxpayer. Rob Ford redefined how municipal campaigns were run in the City of Toronto,” he said in a statement.

“My heart, thoughts and prayers are with the entire Ford family during this difficult period.

“Rob Ford earned widespread respect for his unwavering persistence in the face of serious health concerns — which he summed up in a statement released from his hospital bed during the 2014 campaign: ‘Be strong, stay positive and never, ever give up.’”

 

While serving as city councilor and mayor, Ford was a divisive figure who drew both enthusiastic support and significant criticism from the public.

Dave MacKinnon, 45, was reading the breaking news on his laptop in the hospital lobby Tuesday morning.

“I thought he was politically horrible, but you could never wish this on anybody,” MacKinnon said.

He expressed the conflicting emotions tugging at many Torontonians.

“I have no love for Ford the politician ... but this is a pretty horrendous, awful thing for any family to deal with.”

Ford’s reputation extended far beyond Toronto and the mayor’s death made headlines worldwide.

In the U.S., Ford was remembered less for his political record and more for a video which showed the then-mayor smoking crack. American tabloid news site TMZ announced his death with the headline “Rob Ford ‘Crack Mayor’ Dead at 46,” while the New York Times sent a breaking news alert notifying its readers that the “controversial ex-mayor” was dead.

 

Jimmy Kimmel, who interviewed the mayor on his late-night talk show, tweeted out his condolences.

“Condolences to the family and fans of @TorontoRobFord - an unforgettable guy who loved his job and city like few men I've met,” he wrote on Twitter.

With files from Jennifer Pagliaro, Betsy Powel, Chris Reynolds, David Rider and Jackie Hong

Toronto Star

Reaction to Rob Ford’s death: ‘He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy’

John Tory and Kathleen Wynne are among those paying tribute to the former Toronto mayor, who died today at age 46.

News Mar 22, 2016 by Robin Levinson King OurWindsor.Ca

Former Toronto mayor Rob Ford may have had his share of scandals, but local politicians say he should be remembered as a man devoted to his city.

Ford died Tuesday in Mount Sinai Hospital at age 46 after battling cancer since 2014.

With an ashen face but dry eyes, Ford’s brother Doug hugged and thanked a supporter in the hospital lobby around noon. Moments later, he drove away from the hospital in a black Lincoln Navigator without answering questions from the media.

Ford’s mother Diane, sister Kathy and nephew Michael walked from the hospital to the parking garage across the street shortly after noon without making any comment to waiting reporters.

Related Content

Flags at city hall, Metro Hall and the city’s civic centres will fly at half mast to mark Ford’s passing and will remain there until after his funeral, city officials said.

Mayor John Tory said the city was “reeling” with the news, and expressed his sympathies for the close-knit Ford clan.

“I have known Rob Ford for many years. He was a man who spoke his mind and who ran for office because of the deeply felt convictions that he had. As a councillor, mayor and private citizen, Rob Ford reached out directly to people across the city with a phone call, an offer of advice or support, and I know there are many who were affected by his gregarious nature and approach to public service,” Tory said in a statement.

“His time in City Hall included moments of kindness, of generosity to his council colleagues and real efforts to do what he thought was best for Toronto. He was, above all else, a profoundly human guy whose presence in our city will be missed.”

“Uncle Rob, You have fought the good fight long enough and now can rest in peace. Love you and will forever miss you,” wrote Michael Ford, a Toronto District School Board trustee, on Twitter.

Norm Kelly, who served as Ford’s deputy mayor – and temporarily took over his duties when Ford stepped aside to receive addiction treatment – said he hopes Ford will be remembered for his devotion to the city.

“My hope is that Torontonians will remember Rob Ford for his accomplishments and unswerving dedication to our city,” he said on Twitter.

“My deepest condolences go out to his family and his children. Having lived through this moment, I can have an appreciation for what they’re feeling and I hope that they find peace in this loss,” said Councillor Mike Layton said, referring to the cancer-related death of his father Jack in 2011. “He’ll certainly be missed on the floor of council.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged Ford’s death following a news conference condemning Tuesday’s terror attacks in Brussels.

“My heart goes out to his wife Renata and his two young children. My thoughts are also with the entire family,” Trudeau said.

Premier Kathleen Wynne, who had her share of political disagreements with Ford, paused during question period at Queen’s Park to acknowledge the news about the former mayor as it spread among MPPs in the chamber.

“I just want to express the sadness of this legislature,” she said in a sombre tone, noting that MPPs would hold a moment of silence in tribute to Ford before the lunch break.

“You have been a leader, you have inspired and you never accepted no for an answer. You’ve taught us how city hall should run and you’ve taught us how to fight and you've taught us how to win, and you've always done it with dignity,” said Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti, before heading to Nathan Phillips Square to write a tribute in chalk.

“You have fought your demons and taught all of us on how to fight those demons and win and I personally will miss the hell out of Rob Ford at city hall.”

Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader Patrick Brown recalled meeting Ford when he was 22 and running for city council.

“Rob Ford was passionate about people and public service. I always appreciated that he was unscripted and sincere. He responded to constituent phone calls like no other politician, and vigorously defended the taxpayer. Rob Ford redefined how municipal campaigns were run in the City of Toronto,” he said in a statement.

“My heart, thoughts and prayers are with the entire Ford family during this difficult period.

“Rob Ford earned widespread respect for his unwavering persistence in the face of serious health concerns — which he summed up in a statement released from his hospital bed during the 2014 campaign: ‘Be strong, stay positive and never, ever give up.’”

 

While serving as city councilor and mayor, Ford was a divisive figure who drew both enthusiastic support and significant criticism from the public.

Dave MacKinnon, 45, was reading the breaking news on his laptop in the hospital lobby Tuesday morning.

“I thought he was politically horrible, but you could never wish this on anybody,” MacKinnon said.

He expressed the conflicting emotions tugging at many Torontonians.

“I have no love for Ford the politician ... but this is a pretty horrendous, awful thing for any family to deal with.”

Ford’s reputation extended far beyond Toronto and the mayor’s death made headlines worldwide.

In the U.S., Ford was remembered less for his political record and more for a video which showed the then-mayor smoking crack. American tabloid news site TMZ announced his death with the headline “Rob Ford ‘Crack Mayor’ Dead at 46,” while the New York Times sent a breaking news alert notifying its readers that the “controversial ex-mayor” was dead.

 

Jimmy Kimmel, who interviewed the mayor on his late-night talk show, tweeted out his condolences.

“Condolences to the family and fans of @TorontoRobFord - an unforgettable guy who loved his job and city like few men I've met,” he wrote on Twitter.

With files from Jennifer Pagliaro, Betsy Powel, Chris Reynolds, David Rider and Jackie Hong

Toronto Star