Flamborough Information head Shelley Scott set to retire

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After 20 years, Shelley Scott is retiring as executive director of Flamborough Information and Community Services at the end of March.

Scott said she felt it was the right time to move on. “You have to know the time to step back,” she said. “I just had a feeling that it’s time for somebody with new ideas and new energy to come forth and bring it.”

She said in her time with FICS, she’s seen the agency grow from the point where it only provided community information. “People come in for information like, ‘What are the sports groups in town?’ or ‘What are the service clubs?’” she explained. “It’s grown into a multi-service organization with several difference services.”

Scott said FCIS’s mandate is to look at the needs in the community, set up a program to assess those needs and fulfill the needs.

“It’s connecting people with services, it’s connecting partnerships,” she added. “Our strength is our partnerships that we make, the partnerships that you create to better the community for the people.”

Before starting with FICS, Scott ran the Burlington Children’s Centre daycare, worked at Air Canada and was teacher’s assistant. She noted her background is in social work – she attended McMaster University at the same time as Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin.

Over her 20 years, Scott said she’s happy to have been able to connect with people in need.

“The isolated seniors who wouldn’t otherwise be able to get groceries or socialize with people,” she said. “It’s bringing the agency along with the growth of the urban area, because out here we really don’t have anything and you have to really be able to keep up with the needs.”

She said the most obvious accomplishment is developing the Waterdown Seniors Centre.

“We started, probably 10 years ago having workshops and getting the needs of seniors, working with different levels of government,” she said. “We now have one.”

While she said the centre is run by city staff, FICS has done all of the prep work to get the centre here. “If that goes on and is sustained by the city, that’s fine,” she said. “We can go on and do something else.”

Scott said the biggest thing she’ll miss is the people. “I will miss the people very much,” she said. “Because the clients become your friends, they become acquaintances. I think it’s the people in the community that I’ll miss most.”

But despite being retired, Scott said she’ll continue to volunteer. “I’ve always volunteered,” she said. “I’m looking forward to doing things on my own time. I want to enjoy a big garden, I want to enjoy other things in life.”

Scott noted she’d like to thank all the people in Flamborough who have responded to FICS’s programs. “You’re thankful for the partnerships, the people who have embraced what we do.”

FICS will celebrate Scott’s retirement with cake and refreshments March 30 from 12-1 p.m., at the Senior’s Centre.

New executive director

Following Scott’s retirement, the organization’s new executive director will be Amelia Steinbring.

Currently the co-ordinator of the Age Friendly Guelph leadership team, Steinbring has a background in adult education.

“I’ve taught at both Mohawk and Sheridan,” she said, adding she managed the Oakville Literacy Council for a couple of years. “My background is adult and community literacy.”

Steinbring, who lives in Campbellville with her husband, a former racehorse trainer, and her son, a University of Guelph graduate student, said she’s worked in the area for many years.

“When I saw the position I was intrigued, because part of the work that I’ve always done has been about information referral and really connecting people from the community with services within the community,” she explained. “It seemed like a really neat opportunity, because it’s a brand-new facility with brand-new opportunities.

“It’s something that I know I can do and do well.”

Steinbring said she’s excited to start at her new role, and see where it takes her.

“I think it will take a little while, like any new position, to get to know the people and get to know the location,” she said. “I think one of the main features of the position is being a face in the community.”

Flamborough Information head Shelley Scott set to retire

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After 20 years, Shelley Scott is retiring as executive director of Flamborough Information and Community Services at the end of March.

Scott said she felt it was the right time to move on. “You have to know the time to step back,” she said. “I just had a feeling that it’s time for somebody with new ideas and new energy to come forth and bring it.”

She said in her time with FICS, she’s seen the agency grow from the point where it only provided community information. “People come in for information like, ‘What are the sports groups in town?’ or ‘What are the service clubs?’” she explained. “It’s grown into a multi-service organization with several difference services.”

Scott said FCIS’s mandate is to look at the needs in the community, set up a program to assess those needs and fulfill the needs.

“It’s connecting people with services, it’s connecting partnerships,” she added. “Our strength is our partnerships that we make, the partnerships that you create to better the community for the people.”

Before starting with FICS, Scott ran the Burlington Children’s Centre daycare, worked at Air Canada and was teacher’s assistant. She noted her background is in social work – she attended McMaster University at the same time as Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin.

Over her 20 years, Scott said she’s happy to have been able to connect with people in need.

“The isolated seniors who wouldn’t otherwise be able to get groceries or socialize with people,” she said. “It’s bringing the agency along with the growth of the urban area, because out here we really don’t have anything and you have to really be able to keep up with the needs.”

She said the most obvious accomplishment is developing the Waterdown Seniors Centre.

“We started, probably 10 years ago having workshops and getting the needs of seniors, working with different levels of government,” she said. “We now have one.”

While she said the centre is run by city staff, FICS has done all of the prep work to get the centre here. “If that goes on and is sustained by the city, that’s fine,” she said. “We can go on and do something else.”

Scott said the biggest thing she’ll miss is the people. “I will miss the people very much,” she said. “Because the clients become your friends, they become acquaintances. I think it’s the people in the community that I’ll miss most.”

But despite being retired, Scott said she’ll continue to volunteer. “I’ve always volunteered,” she said. “I’m looking forward to doing things on my own time. I want to enjoy a big garden, I want to enjoy other things in life.”

Scott noted she’d like to thank all the people in Flamborough who have responded to FICS’s programs. “You’re thankful for the partnerships, the people who have embraced what we do.”

FICS will celebrate Scott’s retirement with cake and refreshments March 30 from 12-1 p.m., at the Senior’s Centre.

New executive director

Following Scott’s retirement, the organization’s new executive director will be Amelia Steinbring.

Currently the co-ordinator of the Age Friendly Guelph leadership team, Steinbring has a background in adult education.

“I’ve taught at both Mohawk and Sheridan,” she said, adding she managed the Oakville Literacy Council for a couple of years. “My background is adult and community literacy.”

Steinbring, who lives in Campbellville with her husband, a former racehorse trainer, and her son, a University of Guelph graduate student, said she’s worked in the area for many years.

“When I saw the position I was intrigued, because part of the work that I’ve always done has been about information referral and really connecting people from the community with services within the community,” she explained. “It seemed like a really neat opportunity, because it’s a brand-new facility with brand-new opportunities.

“It’s something that I know I can do and do well.”

Steinbring said she’s excited to start at her new role, and see where it takes her.

“I think it will take a little while, like any new position, to get to know the people and get to know the location,” she said. “I think one of the main features of the position is being a face in the community.”

Flamborough Information head Shelley Scott set to retire

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After 20 years, Shelley Scott is retiring as executive director of Flamborough Information and Community Services at the end of March.

Scott said she felt it was the right time to move on. “You have to know the time to step back,” she said. “I just had a feeling that it’s time for somebody with new ideas and new energy to come forth and bring it.”

She said in her time with FICS, she’s seen the agency grow from the point where it only provided community information. “People come in for information like, ‘What are the sports groups in town?’ or ‘What are the service clubs?’” she explained. “It’s grown into a multi-service organization with several difference services.”

Scott said FCIS’s mandate is to look at the needs in the community, set up a program to assess those needs and fulfill the needs.

“It’s connecting people with services, it’s connecting partnerships,” she added. “Our strength is our partnerships that we make, the partnerships that you create to better the community for the people.”

Before starting with FICS, Scott ran the Burlington Children’s Centre daycare, worked at Air Canada and was teacher’s assistant. She noted her background is in social work – she attended McMaster University at the same time as Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin.

Over her 20 years, Scott said she’s happy to have been able to connect with people in need.

“The isolated seniors who wouldn’t otherwise be able to get groceries or socialize with people,” she said. “It’s bringing the agency along with the growth of the urban area, because out here we really don’t have anything and you have to really be able to keep up with the needs.”

She said the most obvious accomplishment is developing the Waterdown Seniors Centre.

“We started, probably 10 years ago having workshops and getting the needs of seniors, working with different levels of government,” she said. “We now have one.”

While she said the centre is run by city staff, FICS has done all of the prep work to get the centre here. “If that goes on and is sustained by the city, that’s fine,” she said. “We can go on and do something else.”

Scott said the biggest thing she’ll miss is the people. “I will miss the people very much,” she said. “Because the clients become your friends, they become acquaintances. I think it’s the people in the community that I’ll miss most.”

But despite being retired, Scott said she’ll continue to volunteer. “I’ve always volunteered,” she said. “I’m looking forward to doing things on my own time. I want to enjoy a big garden, I want to enjoy other things in life.”

Scott noted she’d like to thank all the people in Flamborough who have responded to FICS’s programs. “You’re thankful for the partnerships, the people who have embraced what we do.”

FICS will celebrate Scott’s retirement with cake and refreshments March 30 from 12-1 p.m., at the Senior’s Centre.

New executive director

Following Scott’s retirement, the organization’s new executive director will be Amelia Steinbring.

Currently the co-ordinator of the Age Friendly Guelph leadership team, Steinbring has a background in adult education.

“I’ve taught at both Mohawk and Sheridan,” she said, adding she managed the Oakville Literacy Council for a couple of years. “My background is adult and community literacy.”

Steinbring, who lives in Campbellville with her husband, a former racehorse trainer, and her son, a University of Guelph graduate student, said she’s worked in the area for many years.

“When I saw the position I was intrigued, because part of the work that I’ve always done has been about information referral and really connecting people from the community with services within the community,” she explained. “It seemed like a really neat opportunity, because it’s a brand-new facility with brand-new opportunities.

“It’s something that I know I can do and do well.”

Steinbring said she’s excited to start at her new role, and see where it takes her.

“I think it will take a little while, like any new position, to get to know the people and get to know the location,” she said. “I think one of the main features of the position is being a face in the community.”