Tourettes not just a swearing disorder, says Hamilton-Halton Niagara chapter president

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Growing up with undiagnosed Tourette syndrome, Ken Shyminski endured self-doubt, social anxiety and depression.

“I had my body that did these things that I didn’t want it to do. I thought I was going crazy,” he said.

Diagnosed as an adult, Shyminski is now a Tourette Canada board member.

The national organization estimates one in 100 Canadians lives with Tourette syndrome and its associated myths.

Along with providing resources and assistance for the Tourettes community, Tourette Canada aims to raise awareness and dispel myths surrounding the syndrome.

Tourette symptoms can include movements and vocal ticks. Eye blinking, nose twitching, shoulder shrugging and coughing are common physical examples.

At Sunday’s Trek for Tourette, hosted by Tourette Canada’s Hamilton-Halton-Niagara chapter, 81 trekkers completed a five-kilometre walkathon beginning and ending at the Valley Park Recreation Centre.

For Shyminski, the event’s main focus is raising awareness.

“Everyone knows what ADHD is and they have an understanding. We want to develop an understanding for Tourette syndrome,” he said.

Sophia Dix, president of the Hamilton-Halton-Niagara Tourette Canada chapter, said the local group has raised more than $45,000 for local and national initiatives over the last eight years.

Trek for Tourette is a national event held on the same day in communities across Canada.

“First and foremost, it’s to raise awareness for Tourette syndrome and then to raise funds for our foundation to support members,” said Dix.

Tourette Canada hosts monthly support groups, social events and seminars on various topics, such as how to navigate the medical system.

“I think the biggest misconception, which the media expecially exploits, is (Tourette) is a swearing disorder,” said Dix.

“Basically, that’s only one type of Tourette disorder, where you use profanity. That’s not common in every case.”

Shyminski knows awareness is steadily growing. On a recent trip to a movie theatre, he overheard someone saying, “That guy’s got Tourettes.”

“I think people are more aware when they see someone with that kind of behaviour out in public,” he said.

For more information on Tourette Canada and local outreach and support services, see Tourette.ca.

Tourettes not just a swearing disorder, says Hamilton-Halton Niagara chapter president

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Growing up with undiagnosed Tourette syndrome, Ken Shyminski endured self-doubt, social anxiety and depression.

“I had my body that did these things that I didn’t want it to do. I thought I was going crazy,” he said.

Diagnosed as an adult, Shyminski is now a Tourette Canada board member.

The national organization estimates one in 100 Canadians lives with Tourette syndrome and its associated myths.

Along with providing resources and assistance for the Tourettes community, Tourette Canada aims to raise awareness and dispel myths surrounding the syndrome.

Tourette symptoms can include movements and vocal ticks. Eye blinking, nose twitching, shoulder shrugging and coughing are common physical examples.

At Sunday’s Trek for Tourette, hosted by Tourette Canada’s Hamilton-Halton-Niagara chapter, 81 trekkers completed a five-kilometre walkathon beginning and ending at the Valley Park Recreation Centre.

For Shyminski, the event’s main focus is raising awareness.

“Everyone knows what ADHD is and they have an understanding. We want to develop an understanding for Tourette syndrome,” he said.

Sophia Dix, president of the Hamilton-Halton-Niagara Tourette Canada chapter, said the local group has raised more than $45,000 for local and national initiatives over the last eight years.

Trek for Tourette is a national event held on the same day in communities across Canada.

“First and foremost, it’s to raise awareness for Tourette syndrome and then to raise funds for our foundation to support members,” said Dix.

Tourette Canada hosts monthly support groups, social events and seminars on various topics, such as how to navigate the medical system.

“I think the biggest misconception, which the media expecially exploits, is (Tourette) is a swearing disorder,” said Dix.

“Basically, that’s only one type of Tourette disorder, where you use profanity. That’s not common in every case.”

Shyminski knows awareness is steadily growing. On a recent trip to a movie theatre, he overheard someone saying, “That guy’s got Tourettes.”

“I think people are more aware when they see someone with that kind of behaviour out in public,” he said.

For more information on Tourette Canada and local outreach and support services, see Tourette.ca.

Tourettes not just a swearing disorder, says Hamilton-Halton Niagara chapter president

News Mar 23, 2016 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Growing up with undiagnosed Tourette syndrome, Ken Shyminski endured self-doubt, social anxiety and depression.

“I had my body that did these things that I didn’t want it to do. I thought I was going crazy,” he said.

Diagnosed as an adult, Shyminski is now a Tourette Canada board member.

The national organization estimates one in 100 Canadians lives with Tourette syndrome and its associated myths.

Along with providing resources and assistance for the Tourettes community, Tourette Canada aims to raise awareness and dispel myths surrounding the syndrome.

Tourette symptoms can include movements and vocal ticks. Eye blinking, nose twitching, shoulder shrugging and coughing are common physical examples.

At Sunday’s Trek for Tourette, hosted by Tourette Canada’s Hamilton-Halton-Niagara chapter, 81 trekkers completed a five-kilometre walkathon beginning and ending at the Valley Park Recreation Centre.

For Shyminski, the event’s main focus is raising awareness.

“Everyone knows what ADHD is and they have an understanding. We want to develop an understanding for Tourette syndrome,” he said.

Sophia Dix, president of the Hamilton-Halton-Niagara Tourette Canada chapter, said the local group has raised more than $45,000 for local and national initiatives over the last eight years.

Trek for Tourette is a national event held on the same day in communities across Canada.

“First and foremost, it’s to raise awareness for Tourette syndrome and then to raise funds for our foundation to support members,” said Dix.

Tourette Canada hosts monthly support groups, social events and seminars on various topics, such as how to navigate the medical system.

“I think the biggest misconception, which the media expecially exploits, is (Tourette) is a swearing disorder,” said Dix.

“Basically, that’s only one type of Tourette disorder, where you use profanity. That’s not common in every case.”

Shyminski knows awareness is steadily growing. On a recent trip to a movie theatre, he overheard someone saying, “That guy’s got Tourettes.”

“I think people are more aware when they see someone with that kind of behaviour out in public,” he said.

For more information on Tourette Canada and local outreach and support services, see Tourette.ca.