Demand keeps Waterdown chocolatier busy during Easter week

News Mar 24, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

The staff at Waterdown’s Beanermunky Chocolate is hopping this week, as local families stock up on sweet treats for the Easter weekend.

According to manager Brittany Gaudet, the store’s chocolatier, it takes about an hour to handcraft one of the shop’s most popular items, the Smash Bunny. “The process takes about 10 minutes,” she noted. “Then it has to sit for 20 minutes, then they have to go in the freezer for 10 minutes . . . there’s all these little steps.”

Gaudet starts out by painting the detail – eyes and bows – into the mold. Next, she ladles in the tempered chocolate and lets it settle before giving the tray a few good whacks to get the air bubbles out.

The next step: suspending the mold upside-down, to drain off the excess chocolate.

The bunny-shaped halves are filled with candy, before being fused together, said Gaudet, who noted the store will sell “easily hundreds” of the tiny chocolate critters (which come in dark chocolate and vegan options) before Easter. As well, the store has plenty of other holiday treats, from birds’ nests to their cheeky “Nutter Butter Chicks.”

Gaudet, who studied forensics at McMaster before discovering her love for crafting sweets, loves the scientific aspect of chocolate.

“I never knew how complicated chocolate was,” she said.

Gaudet works quickly to make sure the batch she’s using doesn’t go out of temper – once that happens, it can’t be used to make the bunnies. “The chocolate is always in charge,” she noted, laughing.

Demand keeps Waterdown chocolatier busy during Easter week

News Mar 24, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

The staff at Waterdown’s Beanermunky Chocolate is hopping this week, as local families stock up on sweet treats for the Easter weekend.

According to manager Brittany Gaudet, the store’s chocolatier, it takes about an hour to handcraft one of the shop’s most popular items, the Smash Bunny. “The process takes about 10 minutes,” she noted. “Then it has to sit for 20 minutes, then they have to go in the freezer for 10 minutes . . . there’s all these little steps.”

Gaudet starts out by painting the detail – eyes and bows – into the mold. Next, she ladles in the tempered chocolate and lets it settle before giving the tray a few good whacks to get the air bubbles out.

The next step: suspending the mold upside-down, to drain off the excess chocolate.

The bunny-shaped halves are filled with candy, before being fused together, said Gaudet, who noted the store will sell “easily hundreds” of the tiny chocolate critters (which come in dark chocolate and vegan options) before Easter. As well, the store has plenty of other holiday treats, from birds’ nests to their cheeky “Nutter Butter Chicks.”

Gaudet, who studied forensics at McMaster before discovering her love for crafting sweets, loves the scientific aspect of chocolate.

“I never knew how complicated chocolate was,” she said.

Gaudet works quickly to make sure the batch she’s using doesn’t go out of temper – once that happens, it can’t be used to make the bunnies. “The chocolate is always in charge,” she noted, laughing.

Demand keeps Waterdown chocolatier busy during Easter week

News Mar 24, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

The staff at Waterdown’s Beanermunky Chocolate is hopping this week, as local families stock up on sweet treats for the Easter weekend.

According to manager Brittany Gaudet, the store’s chocolatier, it takes about an hour to handcraft one of the shop’s most popular items, the Smash Bunny. “The process takes about 10 minutes,” she noted. “Then it has to sit for 20 minutes, then they have to go in the freezer for 10 minutes . . . there’s all these little steps.”

Gaudet starts out by painting the detail – eyes and bows – into the mold. Next, she ladles in the tempered chocolate and lets it settle before giving the tray a few good whacks to get the air bubbles out.

The next step: suspending the mold upside-down, to drain off the excess chocolate.

The bunny-shaped halves are filled with candy, before being fused together, said Gaudet, who noted the store will sell “easily hundreds” of the tiny chocolate critters (which come in dark chocolate and vegan options) before Easter. As well, the store has plenty of other holiday treats, from birds’ nests to their cheeky “Nutter Butter Chicks.”

Gaudet, who studied forensics at McMaster before discovering her love for crafting sweets, loves the scientific aspect of chocolate.

“I never knew how complicated chocolate was,” she said.

Gaudet works quickly to make sure the batch she’s using doesn’t go out of temper – once that happens, it can’t be used to make the bunnies. “The chocolate is always in charge,” she noted, laughing.