Hamilton Health Sciences “not financially sustainable,” says CEO

News Mar 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Health Sciences president and chief executive officer Rob MacIsaac says the healthcare facility will close a campus before it builds a needed urgent care facility on the mountain.

Appearing before Hamilton politicians last week to talk about HHS’s 20-year plan, MacIsaac said HHS needs to invest up to $60 million in capital funding annually to keep its buildings sustainable. Yet, last year HHS invested only about $20 million.

“There is a backlog of deferred maintenance,” said MacIsaac. “I can’t stand by and let the hospital fall apart. It will take some time to say when HHS is sustainable.”

MacIsaac said HHS’s 20-year plan includes possible “consolidation” of its hospitals and campuses. He said some of the facilities over the next couple of decades “will have outlived their usefulness.”

It’s a similar message that he delivered to about 70 health care officials during a “summit” in February at the Hamilton Convention Centre. At that event, MacIsaac said within a decade HHS will have to close a facility.

HHS is one of the largest hospital networks in Ontario, with seven hospitals on six sites, three centres, and one research institution, all with a budget of about $1 billion.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said Hamilton residents are “concerned” about the “possible closure” of a hospital facility. He said what MacIsaac said recently has created “anxiety” in the community.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead urged MacIsaac to consider building a new urgent care facility on the south mountain. Whitehead, who has appealed to HHS officials for a new facility on the south mountain over the last few years, said HHS’s Chedoke campus is already closing, and its estimated 300 employees will be relocated to the Stelco Tower by the end of the year as part of a partnership with IBM Canada.  Whitehead said HHS should use some of the proceeds from selling the Chedoke land to build the urgent care facility.

He said the last urgent care facility was constructed in the lower city, even though it was supposed to have been located on the mountain.

“There is a lot of land that was donated to the community,” said Whitehead. “Capital dollars can be raised from the Chedoke sale.”

MacIsaac defended HHS’s financial situation, arguing if money was available, “I would build an urgent care facility in Dundas, and Ancaster. We’ve heard that plea.”

Part of the HHS 20-year plan includes using hospitals for the most dire health care needs. An emphasis will be on creating hospice and palliative care facilities, ambulatory clinics, community centres, and virtual teams that will deliver “customize care” for people to use rather than overrun already under siege emergency rooms at hospitals. MacIsaac said hospitals have become hospices, and long-term residential care centres.

“Health care as usual is not going to be good enough,” said MacIsaac. “We are thinking about a 20-year time frame (that will) include changes in health care in the years to come.”

 

Hamilton Health Sciences “not financially sustainable,” says CEO

News Mar 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Health Sciences president and chief executive officer Rob MacIsaac says the healthcare facility will close a campus before it builds a needed urgent care facility on the mountain.

Appearing before Hamilton politicians last week to talk about HHS’s 20-year plan, MacIsaac said HHS needs to invest up to $60 million in capital funding annually to keep its buildings sustainable. Yet, last year HHS invested only about $20 million.

“There is a backlog of deferred maintenance,” said MacIsaac. “I can’t stand by and let the hospital fall apart. It will take some time to say when HHS is sustainable.”

MacIsaac said HHS’s 20-year plan includes possible “consolidation” of its hospitals and campuses. He said some of the facilities over the next couple of decades “will have outlived their usefulness.”

It’s a similar message that he delivered to about 70 health care officials during a “summit” in February at the Hamilton Convention Centre. At that event, MacIsaac said within a decade HHS will have to close a facility.

HHS is one of the largest hospital networks in Ontario, with seven hospitals on six sites, three centres, and one research institution, all with a budget of about $1 billion.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said Hamilton residents are “concerned” about the “possible closure” of a hospital facility. He said what MacIsaac said recently has created “anxiety” in the community.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead urged MacIsaac to consider building a new urgent care facility on the south mountain. Whitehead, who has appealed to HHS officials for a new facility on the south mountain over the last few years, said HHS’s Chedoke campus is already closing, and its estimated 300 employees will be relocated to the Stelco Tower by the end of the year as part of a partnership with IBM Canada.  Whitehead said HHS should use some of the proceeds from selling the Chedoke land to build the urgent care facility.

He said the last urgent care facility was constructed in the lower city, even though it was supposed to have been located on the mountain.

“There is a lot of land that was donated to the community,” said Whitehead. “Capital dollars can be raised from the Chedoke sale.”

MacIsaac defended HHS’s financial situation, arguing if money was available, “I would build an urgent care facility in Dundas, and Ancaster. We’ve heard that plea.”

Part of the HHS 20-year plan includes using hospitals for the most dire health care needs. An emphasis will be on creating hospice and palliative care facilities, ambulatory clinics, community centres, and virtual teams that will deliver “customize care” for people to use rather than overrun already under siege emergency rooms at hospitals. MacIsaac said hospitals have become hospices, and long-term residential care centres.

“Health care as usual is not going to be good enough,” said MacIsaac. “We are thinking about a 20-year time frame (that will) include changes in health care in the years to come.”

 

Hamilton Health Sciences “not financially sustainable,” says CEO

News Mar 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Health Sciences president and chief executive officer Rob MacIsaac says the healthcare facility will close a campus before it builds a needed urgent care facility on the mountain.

Appearing before Hamilton politicians last week to talk about HHS’s 20-year plan, MacIsaac said HHS needs to invest up to $60 million in capital funding annually to keep its buildings sustainable. Yet, last year HHS invested only about $20 million.

“There is a backlog of deferred maintenance,” said MacIsaac. “I can’t stand by and let the hospital fall apart. It will take some time to say when HHS is sustainable.”

MacIsaac said HHS’s 20-year plan includes possible “consolidation” of its hospitals and campuses. He said some of the facilities over the next couple of decades “will have outlived their usefulness.”

It’s a similar message that he delivered to about 70 health care officials during a “summit” in February at the Hamilton Convention Centre. At that event, MacIsaac said within a decade HHS will have to close a facility.

HHS is one of the largest hospital networks in Ontario, with seven hospitals on six sites, three centres, and one research institution, all with a budget of about $1 billion.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said Hamilton residents are “concerned” about the “possible closure” of a hospital facility. He said what MacIsaac said recently has created “anxiety” in the community.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead urged MacIsaac to consider building a new urgent care facility on the south mountain. Whitehead, who has appealed to HHS officials for a new facility on the south mountain over the last few years, said HHS’s Chedoke campus is already closing, and its estimated 300 employees will be relocated to the Stelco Tower by the end of the year as part of a partnership with IBM Canada.  Whitehead said HHS should use some of the proceeds from selling the Chedoke land to build the urgent care facility.

He said the last urgent care facility was constructed in the lower city, even though it was supposed to have been located on the mountain.

“There is a lot of land that was donated to the community,” said Whitehead. “Capital dollars can be raised from the Chedoke sale.”

MacIsaac defended HHS’s financial situation, arguing if money was available, “I would build an urgent care facility in Dundas, and Ancaster. We’ve heard that plea.”

Part of the HHS 20-year plan includes using hospitals for the most dire health care needs. An emphasis will be on creating hospice and palliative care facilities, ambulatory clinics, community centres, and virtual teams that will deliver “customize care” for people to use rather than overrun already under siege emergency rooms at hospitals. MacIsaac said hospitals have become hospices, and long-term residential care centres.

“Health care as usual is not going to be good enough,” said MacIsaac. “We are thinking about a 20-year time frame (that will) include changes in health care in the years to come.”