Coyotes attack dog in Dundas Valley

News Mar 25, 2016 by Joel OpHardt The Hamilton Spectator

Virginia Clews and her lab, Kiki, were enjoying a morning walk at Iroquoia Heights in Ancaster when two coyotes suddenly appeared.

Clews and 95-pound Kiki were a few minutes down Scenic Iroquoia Walk when the seven-year-old lab was attacked Tuesday.

"When I yelled, they all sort of stopped, and then she booted it and left me — the coward," Clews joked. "She was so frightened, and I was too to be truthful."

Kiki sprinted back toward the parking lot, and the coyotes followed Clews for a short distance.

The dog was left with a small puncture wound on her back left leg, which Clews cleaned with peroxide.

Based on how she walked Wednesday afternoon, Kiki seems OK, Clews said.

She says the coyotes were about 85 pounds, brown and "scraggly looking."

That matches the description of a coywolf — a hybrid between the eastern coyote and eastern brushwolf, says a Hamilton Conservation Authority official.

"These hybrids are smarter, more adaptive to integrating with human populations and urban situations," said chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland.

The coywolf is here to stay, he added: it should be expected and respected, but not feared.

They are not aggressive toward humans, but off-leash dogs in particular can get into problems, Firth-Eagland said.

"Rarely is there ever any contact with a dog and coyote when the dog was on leash," he said. "All parties considered, it is the best behaviour to ensure safety for our canine friends, ourselves and the coyotes."

Firth-Eagland estimated about half a dozen coyote encounters are reported each year.

The conservation authority is taking notice of the unprovoked coyote incident seriously and has put up warning signs in the area and a notice online, says Gordon Costie, director of conservation area services.

Dundas Valley staff "continues to monitor the area for coyote sightings and public reports," Costie said.

Right now, the valley's animal population is booming — from deer to squirrels, and yes, even coyotes, Firth-Eagland notes.

"It would be peak season for defending one's territory."

Clews, who has walked the trail for 25 years, says she has posted a sign in the area to warn people of the possible danger.

"As long as people are aware, I don't think there is an issue."

jophardt@thespec.com

905-526-3408

Coyotes attack dog in Dundas Valley

News Mar 25, 2016 by Joel OpHardt The Hamilton Spectator

Virginia Clews and her lab, Kiki, were enjoying a morning walk at Iroquoia Heights in Ancaster when two coyotes suddenly appeared.

Clews and 95-pound Kiki were a few minutes down Scenic Iroquoia Walk when the seven-year-old lab was attacked Tuesday.

"When I yelled, they all sort of stopped, and then she booted it and left me — the coward," Clews joked. "She was so frightened, and I was too to be truthful."

Kiki sprinted back toward the parking lot, and the coyotes followed Clews for a short distance.

The dog was left with a small puncture wound on her back left leg, which Clews cleaned with peroxide.

Based on how she walked Wednesday afternoon, Kiki seems OK, Clews said.

She says the coyotes were about 85 pounds, brown and "scraggly looking."

That matches the description of a coywolf — a hybrid between the eastern coyote and eastern brushwolf, says a Hamilton Conservation Authority official.

"These hybrids are smarter, more adaptive to integrating with human populations and urban situations," said chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland.

The coywolf is here to stay, he added: it should be expected and respected, but not feared.

They are not aggressive toward humans, but off-leash dogs in particular can get into problems, Firth-Eagland said.

"Rarely is there ever any contact with a dog and coyote when the dog was on leash," he said. "All parties considered, it is the best behaviour to ensure safety for our canine friends, ourselves and the coyotes."

Firth-Eagland estimated about half a dozen coyote encounters are reported each year.

The conservation authority is taking notice of the unprovoked coyote incident seriously and has put up warning signs in the area and a notice online, says Gordon Costie, director of conservation area services.

Dundas Valley staff "continues to monitor the area for coyote sightings and public reports," Costie said.

Right now, the valley's animal population is booming — from deer to squirrels, and yes, even coyotes, Firth-Eagland notes.

"It would be peak season for defending one's territory."

Clews, who has walked the trail for 25 years, says she has posted a sign in the area to warn people of the possible danger.

"As long as people are aware, I don't think there is an issue."

jophardt@thespec.com

905-526-3408

Coyotes attack dog in Dundas Valley

News Mar 25, 2016 by Joel OpHardt The Hamilton Spectator

Virginia Clews and her lab, Kiki, were enjoying a morning walk at Iroquoia Heights in Ancaster when two coyotes suddenly appeared.

Clews and 95-pound Kiki were a few minutes down Scenic Iroquoia Walk when the seven-year-old lab was attacked Tuesday.

"When I yelled, they all sort of stopped, and then she booted it and left me — the coward," Clews joked. "She was so frightened, and I was too to be truthful."

Kiki sprinted back toward the parking lot, and the coyotes followed Clews for a short distance.

The dog was left with a small puncture wound on her back left leg, which Clews cleaned with peroxide.

Based on how she walked Wednesday afternoon, Kiki seems OK, Clews said.

She says the coyotes were about 85 pounds, brown and "scraggly looking."

That matches the description of a coywolf — a hybrid between the eastern coyote and eastern brushwolf, says a Hamilton Conservation Authority official.

"These hybrids are smarter, more adaptive to integrating with human populations and urban situations," said chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland.

The coywolf is here to stay, he added: it should be expected and respected, but not feared.

They are not aggressive toward humans, but off-leash dogs in particular can get into problems, Firth-Eagland said.

"Rarely is there ever any contact with a dog and coyote when the dog was on leash," he said. "All parties considered, it is the best behaviour to ensure safety for our canine friends, ourselves and the coyotes."

Firth-Eagland estimated about half a dozen coyote encounters are reported each year.

The conservation authority is taking notice of the unprovoked coyote incident seriously and has put up warning signs in the area and a notice online, says Gordon Costie, director of conservation area services.

Dundas Valley staff "continues to monitor the area for coyote sightings and public reports," Costie said.

Right now, the valley's animal population is booming — from deer to squirrels, and yes, even coyotes, Firth-Eagland notes.

"It would be peak season for defending one's territory."

Clews, who has walked the trail for 25 years, says she has posted a sign in the area to warn people of the possible danger.

"As long as people are aware, I don't think there is an issue."

jophardt@thespec.com

905-526-3408