Rabies cases in Hamilton hit 65

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

The wildlife rabies problem in Hamilton is spreading to more skunks while the number of raccoons and skunks found with rabies since December has jumped by 44 cases to 65 in the past two months.

The 65 cases break down into 46 raccoons and 19 skunks. They account for most of the 70 cases found in all of Ontario since December, according to the city of Hamilton website.

Only five other cases, all in raccoons, have been found in the rest of the province — four in Haldimand-Norfolk and one in Niagara Region — making Hamilton the raccoon rabies capital right now.

The outbreak in December that started in raccoons only, came as a surprise given no raccoons had tested positive for rabies in Ontario for a decade.

The Ministry of Natural Resources in December was spreading vaccine baits by air and by hand in a wide area stretching from North Burlington to Lake Erie to combat the outbreak.

Up to 185,000 baits were expected to be used by January.

The highest number of Hamilton's raccoon strain rabies, which includes affected skunks, is in Glanbrook, which has had 21 cases since December.

The other cases are spread throughout the city, with nine each found in Ancaster and in lower east Hamilton. Only the central lower city and Flamborough have not had any cases so far.

The city's website reminds the public the overall risk to people remains low, but if bitten or scratched by an animal, wash the bite or scratch with soap and water immediately to reduce the chances of infection. Call your doctor immediately and have your doctor look at all animal bites. Call the city immediately at 905-546-2489, where the phone is answered 24-7.

Other measures to take to minimize your risk include vaccinating pets against rabies and keeping vaccines up-to-date, do not let pets roam free outside and keep your pets indoors at night time to avoid contact with wild animals.

Rabies is caused by a virus, and any warm-blooded animal can get rabies, including humans. It is transmitted or spread through a bit or other saliva contact from an infected animal. The most common way of getting rabies is through a bite.

It is more commonly found in bats, raccoons, foxes, skunks and coyotes.

Rabies is a preventable disease that infects the central nervous system and is usually fatal in humans unless treatment starts before symptoms appear.

For more information, visit hamilton.ca/public-health/health-topics/rabies

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec

Rabies cases in Hamilton hit 65

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

The wildlife rabies problem in Hamilton is spreading to more skunks while the number of raccoons and skunks found with rabies since December has jumped by 44 cases to 65 in the past two months.

The 65 cases break down into 46 raccoons and 19 skunks. They account for most of the 70 cases found in all of Ontario since December, according to the city of Hamilton website.

Only five other cases, all in raccoons, have been found in the rest of the province — four in Haldimand-Norfolk and one in Niagara Region — making Hamilton the raccoon rabies capital right now.

The outbreak in December that started in raccoons only, came as a surprise given no raccoons had tested positive for rabies in Ontario for a decade.

The Ministry of Natural Resources in December was spreading vaccine baits by air and by hand in a wide area stretching from North Burlington to Lake Erie to combat the outbreak.

Up to 185,000 baits were expected to be used by January.

The highest number of Hamilton's raccoon strain rabies, which includes affected skunks, is in Glanbrook, which has had 21 cases since December.

The other cases are spread throughout the city, with nine each found in Ancaster and in lower east Hamilton. Only the central lower city and Flamborough have not had any cases so far.

The city's website reminds the public the overall risk to people remains low, but if bitten or scratched by an animal, wash the bite or scratch with soap and water immediately to reduce the chances of infection. Call your doctor immediately and have your doctor look at all animal bites. Call the city immediately at 905-546-2489, where the phone is answered 24-7.

Other measures to take to minimize your risk include vaccinating pets against rabies and keeping vaccines up-to-date, do not let pets roam free outside and keep your pets indoors at night time to avoid contact with wild animals.

Rabies is caused by a virus, and any warm-blooded animal can get rabies, including humans. It is transmitted or spread through a bit or other saliva contact from an infected animal. The most common way of getting rabies is through a bite.

It is more commonly found in bats, raccoons, foxes, skunks and coyotes.

Rabies is a preventable disease that infects the central nervous system and is usually fatal in humans unless treatment starts before symptoms appear.

For more information, visit hamilton.ca/public-health/health-topics/rabies

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec

Rabies cases in Hamilton hit 65

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

The wildlife rabies problem in Hamilton is spreading to more skunks while the number of raccoons and skunks found with rabies since December has jumped by 44 cases to 65 in the past two months.

The 65 cases break down into 46 raccoons and 19 skunks. They account for most of the 70 cases found in all of Ontario since December, according to the city of Hamilton website.

Only five other cases, all in raccoons, have been found in the rest of the province — four in Haldimand-Norfolk and one in Niagara Region — making Hamilton the raccoon rabies capital right now.

The outbreak in December that started in raccoons only, came as a surprise given no raccoons had tested positive for rabies in Ontario for a decade.

The Ministry of Natural Resources in December was spreading vaccine baits by air and by hand in a wide area stretching from North Burlington to Lake Erie to combat the outbreak.

Up to 185,000 baits were expected to be used by January.

The highest number of Hamilton's raccoon strain rabies, which includes affected skunks, is in Glanbrook, which has had 21 cases since December.

The other cases are spread throughout the city, with nine each found in Ancaster and in lower east Hamilton. Only the central lower city and Flamborough have not had any cases so far.

The city's website reminds the public the overall risk to people remains low, but if bitten or scratched by an animal, wash the bite or scratch with soap and water immediately to reduce the chances of infection. Call your doctor immediately and have your doctor look at all animal bites. Call the city immediately at 905-546-2489, where the phone is answered 24-7.

Other measures to take to minimize your risk include vaccinating pets against rabies and keeping vaccines up-to-date, do not let pets roam free outside and keep your pets indoors at night time to avoid contact with wild animals.

Rabies is caused by a virus, and any warm-blooded animal can get rabies, including humans. It is transmitted or spread through a bit or other saliva contact from an infected animal. The most common way of getting rabies is through a bite.

It is more commonly found in bats, raccoons, foxes, skunks and coyotes.

Rabies is a preventable disease that infects the central nervous system and is usually fatal in humans unless treatment starts before symptoms appear.

For more information, visit hamilton.ca/public-health/health-topics/rabies

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec