Flamborough representatives react to federal budget

News Mar 28, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet is critical of the first federal budget from Trudeau Liberals.

Sweet, speaking from his Parliament Hill office following the budget’s reading, said his biggest concern is the growing federal debt projected by the budget.

“They’re projecting, by the time the next election comes around, by the end of their mandate, there will be $100 billion-plus added to the debt,” he said. “So that’s troubling. But it’s even more troubling when there’s no plan to go back to balance.

“It wasn’t talked about, it wasn’t mentioned at all, it’s not mentioned in the document.”

The budget, which calls for big deficits over the next five years – including a $29.4-billion deficit next year, is projecting the debt will grow to $113 billion over five years.

The Opposition MP said he was surprised by the projections, noting the Liberals had said they would run modest deficits for a few years, before going back to balance.

“This is three times more than what they said,” he noted. “If I remember the promise correctly, it was $10 billion, $10 billion and $5 billion.”

Sweet was also troubled by the lack incentives for businesses to drive job growth.

“There’s no tax relief at all – still at 10.5 per cent – they were talking about reducing the small business tax rate, but that wasn’t done,” he said. “All of the spending is public spending and that doesn’t bode well for an economy that needs to create jobs.”

While the budget did pledge $120 billion for infrastructure spending over 10 years – including public transit, water, waste management and housing – Sweet said he saw nothing in the budget earmarked specifically for Flamborough-GLanbrook or the greater Hamilton area.

From a positive standpoint, Sweet hopes the Liberal government spends the infrastructure dollars wisely.

“I hope . . . that they spend it on hard, good assets that will do things like move traffic better,” he said, noting that spending will positively impact future generations. “I’m hoping that they do a good job in that regard.”

Sweet said he was also concerned about labeling the document as a middle class budget, by adding a tax-free monthly child benefit but removing income splitting for families.

“It becomes a shell game and makes it very difficult for the average person that doesn’t have the scrutiny an accountant has to see exactly what the real aspect is,” he said. “There’s no net gain if you take a look at the income splitting and the removal of the fitness tax credit and the arts tax credit.”

For the Flamborough-Glanbrook area, Sweet said he would have liked more incentives for small businesses included in the budget.

“I would have wanted to see a better tax rate for small businesses,” he said. “Those things that cause people to move their capital into the area and do business within Hamilton.”

Meanwhile, Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin said he thought the budget was great.

“It was all they promised, and more,” he said.

McMeekin was particularly pleased to the see the federal government make commitments to aboriginal peoples and social housing.

He noted the budget pledged an $800-million increase in social housing spending, to $1.6 billion, with the provincial government picking up half of the increase.

As Minister of Housing, McMeekin – who wrote his Master’s thesis on how to eradicate homelessness – said a commitment to the private-public program to incentivize developers to build social and affordable housing is exciting.

From a local standpoint, McMeekin said the investment in infrastructure is exciting.

In contrast to Sweet’s view, McMeekin said it’s “good to be working with a government that actually understands that it needs to invest in job creation and people.

“I feel like I’ve got my country back,” he added.

Flamborough representatives react to federal budget

News Mar 28, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet is critical of the first federal budget from Trudeau Liberals.

Sweet, speaking from his Parliament Hill office following the budget’s reading, said his biggest concern is the growing federal debt projected by the budget.

“They’re projecting, by the time the next election comes around, by the end of their mandate, there will be $100 billion-plus added to the debt,” he said. “So that’s troubling. But it’s even more troubling when there’s no plan to go back to balance.

“It wasn’t talked about, it wasn’t mentioned at all, it’s not mentioned in the document.”

The budget, which calls for big deficits over the next five years – including a $29.4-billion deficit next year, is projecting the debt will grow to $113 billion over five years.

The Opposition MP said he was surprised by the projections, noting the Liberals had said they would run modest deficits for a few years, before going back to balance.

“This is three times more than what they said,” he noted. “If I remember the promise correctly, it was $10 billion, $10 billion and $5 billion.”

Sweet was also troubled by the lack incentives for businesses to drive job growth.

“There’s no tax relief at all – still at 10.5 per cent – they were talking about reducing the small business tax rate, but that wasn’t done,” he said. “All of the spending is public spending and that doesn’t bode well for an economy that needs to create jobs.”

While the budget did pledge $120 billion for infrastructure spending over 10 years – including public transit, water, waste management and housing – Sweet said he saw nothing in the budget earmarked specifically for Flamborough-GLanbrook or the greater Hamilton area.

From a positive standpoint, Sweet hopes the Liberal government spends the infrastructure dollars wisely.

“I hope . . . that they spend it on hard, good assets that will do things like move traffic better,” he said, noting that spending will positively impact future generations. “I’m hoping that they do a good job in that regard.”

Sweet said he was also concerned about labeling the document as a middle class budget, by adding a tax-free monthly child benefit but removing income splitting for families.

“It becomes a shell game and makes it very difficult for the average person that doesn’t have the scrutiny an accountant has to see exactly what the real aspect is,” he said. “There’s no net gain if you take a look at the income splitting and the removal of the fitness tax credit and the arts tax credit.”

For the Flamborough-Glanbrook area, Sweet said he would have liked more incentives for small businesses included in the budget.

“I would have wanted to see a better tax rate for small businesses,” he said. “Those things that cause people to move their capital into the area and do business within Hamilton.”

Meanwhile, Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin said he thought the budget was great.

“It was all they promised, and more,” he said.

McMeekin was particularly pleased to the see the federal government make commitments to aboriginal peoples and social housing.

He noted the budget pledged an $800-million increase in social housing spending, to $1.6 billion, with the provincial government picking up half of the increase.

As Minister of Housing, McMeekin – who wrote his Master’s thesis on how to eradicate homelessness – said a commitment to the private-public program to incentivize developers to build social and affordable housing is exciting.

From a local standpoint, McMeekin said the investment in infrastructure is exciting.

In contrast to Sweet’s view, McMeekin said it’s “good to be working with a government that actually understands that it needs to invest in job creation and people.

“I feel like I’ve got my country back,” he added.

Flamborough representatives react to federal budget

News Mar 28, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Flamborough-Glanbrook MP David Sweet is critical of the first federal budget from Trudeau Liberals.

Sweet, speaking from his Parliament Hill office following the budget’s reading, said his biggest concern is the growing federal debt projected by the budget.

“They’re projecting, by the time the next election comes around, by the end of their mandate, there will be $100 billion-plus added to the debt,” he said. “So that’s troubling. But it’s even more troubling when there’s no plan to go back to balance.

“It wasn’t talked about, it wasn’t mentioned at all, it’s not mentioned in the document.”

The budget, which calls for big deficits over the next five years – including a $29.4-billion deficit next year, is projecting the debt will grow to $113 billion over five years.

The Opposition MP said he was surprised by the projections, noting the Liberals had said they would run modest deficits for a few years, before going back to balance.

“This is three times more than what they said,” he noted. “If I remember the promise correctly, it was $10 billion, $10 billion and $5 billion.”

Sweet was also troubled by the lack incentives for businesses to drive job growth.

“There’s no tax relief at all – still at 10.5 per cent – they were talking about reducing the small business tax rate, but that wasn’t done,” he said. “All of the spending is public spending and that doesn’t bode well for an economy that needs to create jobs.”

While the budget did pledge $120 billion for infrastructure spending over 10 years – including public transit, water, waste management and housing – Sweet said he saw nothing in the budget earmarked specifically for Flamborough-GLanbrook or the greater Hamilton area.

From a positive standpoint, Sweet hopes the Liberal government spends the infrastructure dollars wisely.

“I hope . . . that they spend it on hard, good assets that will do things like move traffic better,” he said, noting that spending will positively impact future generations. “I’m hoping that they do a good job in that regard.”

Sweet said he was also concerned about labeling the document as a middle class budget, by adding a tax-free monthly child benefit but removing income splitting for families.

“It becomes a shell game and makes it very difficult for the average person that doesn’t have the scrutiny an accountant has to see exactly what the real aspect is,” he said. “There’s no net gain if you take a look at the income splitting and the removal of the fitness tax credit and the arts tax credit.”

For the Flamborough-Glanbrook area, Sweet said he would have liked more incentives for small businesses included in the budget.

“I would have wanted to see a better tax rate for small businesses,” he said. “Those things that cause people to move their capital into the area and do business within Hamilton.”

Meanwhile, Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MPP Ted McMeekin said he thought the budget was great.

“It was all they promised, and more,” he said.

McMeekin was particularly pleased to the see the federal government make commitments to aboriginal peoples and social housing.

He noted the budget pledged an $800-million increase in social housing spending, to $1.6 billion, with the provincial government picking up half of the increase.

As Minister of Housing, McMeekin – who wrote his Master’s thesis on how to eradicate homelessness – said a commitment to the private-public program to incentivize developers to build social and affordable housing is exciting.

From a local standpoint, McMeekin said the investment in infrastructure is exciting.

In contrast to Sweet’s view, McMeekin said it’s “good to be working with a government that actually understands that it needs to invest in job creation and people.

“I feel like I’ve got my country back,” he added.