Flamborough animals in need lose a very good friend

News Mar 29, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Vulnerable animals in our community lost a staunch advocate earlier this month.

Mary Elizabeth Jane Griffiths – Betty to all who knew her – wasn’t one for the spotlight. In fact, she was intensely private, opting instead to work behind the scenes. And work she did.

Although retired from a job at a local bank since 1988, she spent the last 18 years handling all the placement assessments for Animal Adoptions of Flamborough (AAF). In addition, she was the voice callers heard on the other end of the shelter’s line outside of business hours.

“She poured her heart and soul into it,” said AAF President Mary Lamb, who worked alongside Griffiths for those 18 years. “She did all the intakes and the adoptions.”

The telephone became a lifeline of sorts for Griffiths, who was 93 and still lived in the family home purchased in 1945 when she passed away March 11. In addition to her work for AAF, she was also a Tele-Touch volunteer who checked in with elderly clients daily. As well, she spoke with Lamb up to six times a day and other friends she called regularly.

Griffiths is survived by her son Jim and his wife Sigrid, and daughter Gertha, as well as several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Griffiths had a passion for music, gardening, painting and pottery. But animals held a special place in her heart. A dog owner herself – her beloved Soushi and Misty have been placed with new owners – she always put the welfare of any pet in her care first when making a placement.

And while Griffiths’ plain manner of speaking may not have been everyone’s cup of tea, her heart was always in the right place, added her longtime friend. “She called it like it was,” said Lamb, whose name is also Mary Elizabeth. “When she was screening animals, she always kept in mind what’s best for the animals, not the person on the other end of the phone.”

Griffiths’ passing leaves shoes too big to fill at AAF: Lamb has already switched the shelter’s phone service to an outgoing message only during off hours. She is also having a plaque made to honour Griffiths’ dedication to the charity.

Lamb noted that despite Griffiths’ wish to “fade away,” rather than have a formal funeral service, her passing affected too many people to leave her contributions unrecognized. Instead, she is planning a community tea in her memory that will serve as a fundraiser for Animal Adoptions. “It will be for all the people she left behind, the people that miss her.”

Flamborough animals in need lose a very good friend

News Mar 29, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Vulnerable animals in our community lost a staunch advocate earlier this month.

Mary Elizabeth Jane Griffiths – Betty to all who knew her – wasn’t one for the spotlight. In fact, she was intensely private, opting instead to work behind the scenes. And work she did.

Although retired from a job at a local bank since 1988, she spent the last 18 years handling all the placement assessments for Animal Adoptions of Flamborough (AAF). In addition, she was the voice callers heard on the other end of the shelter’s line outside of business hours.

“She poured her heart and soul into it,” said AAF President Mary Lamb, who worked alongside Griffiths for those 18 years. “She did all the intakes and the adoptions.”

The telephone became a lifeline of sorts for Griffiths, who was 93 and still lived in the family home purchased in 1945 when she passed away March 11. In addition to her work for AAF, she was also a Tele-Touch volunteer who checked in with elderly clients daily. As well, she spoke with Lamb up to six times a day and other friends she called regularly.

Griffiths is survived by her son Jim and his wife Sigrid, and daughter Gertha, as well as several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Griffiths had a passion for music, gardening, painting and pottery. But animals held a special place in her heart. A dog owner herself – her beloved Soushi and Misty have been placed with new owners – she always put the welfare of any pet in her care first when making a placement.

And while Griffiths’ plain manner of speaking may not have been everyone’s cup of tea, her heart was always in the right place, added her longtime friend. “She called it like it was,” said Lamb, whose name is also Mary Elizabeth. “When she was screening animals, she always kept in mind what’s best for the animals, not the person on the other end of the phone.”

Griffiths’ passing leaves shoes too big to fill at AAF: Lamb has already switched the shelter’s phone service to an outgoing message only during off hours. She is also having a plaque made to honour Griffiths’ dedication to the charity.

Lamb noted that despite Griffiths’ wish to “fade away,” rather than have a formal funeral service, her passing affected too many people to leave her contributions unrecognized. Instead, she is planning a community tea in her memory that will serve as a fundraiser for Animal Adoptions. “It will be for all the people she left behind, the people that miss her.”

Flamborough animals in need lose a very good friend

News Mar 29, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Vulnerable animals in our community lost a staunch advocate earlier this month.

Mary Elizabeth Jane Griffiths – Betty to all who knew her – wasn’t one for the spotlight. In fact, she was intensely private, opting instead to work behind the scenes. And work she did.

Although retired from a job at a local bank since 1988, she spent the last 18 years handling all the placement assessments for Animal Adoptions of Flamborough (AAF). In addition, she was the voice callers heard on the other end of the shelter’s line outside of business hours.

“She poured her heart and soul into it,” said AAF President Mary Lamb, who worked alongside Griffiths for those 18 years. “She did all the intakes and the adoptions.”

The telephone became a lifeline of sorts for Griffiths, who was 93 and still lived in the family home purchased in 1945 when she passed away March 11. In addition to her work for AAF, she was also a Tele-Touch volunteer who checked in with elderly clients daily. As well, she spoke with Lamb up to six times a day and other friends she called regularly.

Griffiths is survived by her son Jim and his wife Sigrid, and daughter Gertha, as well as several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Griffiths had a passion for music, gardening, painting and pottery. But animals held a special place in her heart. A dog owner herself – her beloved Soushi and Misty have been placed with new owners – she always put the welfare of any pet in her care first when making a placement.

And while Griffiths’ plain manner of speaking may not have been everyone’s cup of tea, her heart was always in the right place, added her longtime friend. “She called it like it was,” said Lamb, whose name is also Mary Elizabeth. “When she was screening animals, she always kept in mind what’s best for the animals, not the person on the other end of the phone.”

Griffiths’ passing leaves shoes too big to fill at AAF: Lamb has already switched the shelter’s phone service to an outgoing message only during off hours. She is also having a plaque made to honour Griffiths’ dedication to the charity.

Lamb noted that despite Griffiths’ wish to “fade away,” rather than have a formal funeral service, her passing affected too many people to leave her contributions unrecognized. Instead, she is planning a community tea in her memory that will serve as a fundraiser for Animal Adoptions. “It will be for all the people she left behind, the people that miss her.”