What does it mean to be Canadian in 2016?

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

Community representatives are hoping a symposium on living together will contribute to inclusiveness and respect, not just locally, but among all Canadians.

Coun. Matthew Green moderated the Hamilton Living Together Symposium on Tuesday at the Art Gallery of Hamilton.

The forum was attended by 100 people and put on by the Canada Race Relations Foundation and local partners to explore what Canadian values are and what it means to be a Canadian in 2016.

One of six forums across Canada, Hamilton's is "a continued conversation" on the challenges of indigenous reconciliation, Islamophobia, anti-black racism and Syrian refugee xenophobia, Green said.

"This conversation is critical to realize how we as Canadians can continue to build an inclusive and empathetic society."

Race relations foundation director Anita Bromberg said in the face of divisive acts and feelings of exclusion, "it means getting the dialogue right so respect for human rights and freedoms can become a reality on the ground and not just in words."

The day started with questions posed to local panelists with refugee, aboriginal, immigrant and visible minority backgrounds.

"It is important that we're open and accepting," said Susan Barberstock, director of the Hamilton Regional Indian Centre.

She touched on the important seven grandfather indigenous teachings: wisdom, love, respect, truth, bravery, honesty and humility.

"We need to think seriously about what they mean," Barberstock said.

McMaster University social work assistant professor Ameil Joseph, whose parents immigrated in 1969, said anti-immigrant sentiments in Canadian policy and law invokes "the idea people don't belong here."

Empowerment Squared director and former refugee Leo Nupolu Johnson said indigenous history must stopped being treated as a "footnote" in Canada's history.

"Our culture is rooted in the culture of our indigenous people…We should love and enhance each other and not try to wipe each other out."

Marlene Dei-Amoah said her immigrant parents, both professionals, were recruited to Canada.

"We felt we were wanted, but it was clear we weren't when we got here," said Dei-Amoah, a member of the city's committee against racism.

It's great that Canadians encourage people to come here, but they must also prepare newcomers to deal with the impact of racism and prejudice, she said.

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec

What does it mean to be Canadian in 2016?

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

Community representatives are hoping a symposium on living together will contribute to inclusiveness and respect, not just locally, but among all Canadians.

Coun. Matthew Green moderated the Hamilton Living Together Symposium on Tuesday at the Art Gallery of Hamilton.

The forum was attended by 100 people and put on by the Canada Race Relations Foundation and local partners to explore what Canadian values are and what it means to be a Canadian in 2016.

One of six forums across Canada, Hamilton's is "a continued conversation" on the challenges of indigenous reconciliation, Islamophobia, anti-black racism and Syrian refugee xenophobia, Green said.

"This conversation is critical to realize how we as Canadians can continue to build an inclusive and empathetic society."

Race relations foundation director Anita Bromberg said in the face of divisive acts and feelings of exclusion, "it means getting the dialogue right so respect for human rights and freedoms can become a reality on the ground and not just in words."

The day started with questions posed to local panelists with refugee, aboriginal, immigrant and visible minority backgrounds.

"It is important that we're open and accepting," said Susan Barberstock, director of the Hamilton Regional Indian Centre.

She touched on the important seven grandfather indigenous teachings: wisdom, love, respect, truth, bravery, honesty and humility.

"We need to think seriously about what they mean," Barberstock said.

McMaster University social work assistant professor Ameil Joseph, whose parents immigrated in 1969, said anti-immigrant sentiments in Canadian policy and law invokes "the idea people don't belong here."

Empowerment Squared director and former refugee Leo Nupolu Johnson said indigenous history must stopped being treated as a "footnote" in Canada's history.

"Our culture is rooted in the culture of our indigenous people…We should love and enhance each other and not try to wipe each other out."

Marlene Dei-Amoah said her immigrant parents, both professionals, were recruited to Canada.

"We felt we were wanted, but it was clear we weren't when we got here," said Dei-Amoah, a member of the city's committee against racism.

It's great that Canadians encourage people to come here, but they must also prepare newcomers to deal with the impact of racism and prejudice, she said.

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec

What does it mean to be Canadian in 2016?

News Mar 29, 2016 by Carmela Fragomeni The Hamilton Spectator

Community representatives are hoping a symposium on living together will contribute to inclusiveness and respect, not just locally, but among all Canadians.

Coun. Matthew Green moderated the Hamilton Living Together Symposium on Tuesday at the Art Gallery of Hamilton.

The forum was attended by 100 people and put on by the Canada Race Relations Foundation and local partners to explore what Canadian values are and what it means to be a Canadian in 2016.

One of six forums across Canada, Hamilton's is "a continued conversation" on the challenges of indigenous reconciliation, Islamophobia, anti-black racism and Syrian refugee xenophobia, Green said.

"This conversation is critical to realize how we as Canadians can continue to build an inclusive and empathetic society."

Race relations foundation director Anita Bromberg said in the face of divisive acts and feelings of exclusion, "it means getting the dialogue right so respect for human rights and freedoms can become a reality on the ground and not just in words."

The day started with questions posed to local panelists with refugee, aboriginal, immigrant and visible minority backgrounds.

"It is important that we're open and accepting," said Susan Barberstock, director of the Hamilton Regional Indian Centre.

She touched on the important seven grandfather indigenous teachings: wisdom, love, respect, truth, bravery, honesty and humility.

"We need to think seriously about what they mean," Barberstock said.

McMaster University social work assistant professor Ameil Joseph, whose parents immigrated in 1969, said anti-immigrant sentiments in Canadian policy and law invokes "the idea people don't belong here."

Empowerment Squared director and former refugee Leo Nupolu Johnson said indigenous history must stopped being treated as a "footnote" in Canada's history.

"Our culture is rooted in the culture of our indigenous people…We should love and enhance each other and not try to wipe each other out."

Marlene Dei-Amoah said her immigrant parents, both professionals, were recruited to Canada.

"We felt we were wanted, but it was clear we weren't when we got here," said Dei-Amoah, a member of the city's committee against racism.

It's great that Canadians encourage people to come here, but they must also prepare newcomers to deal with the impact of racism and prejudice, she said.

cfragomeni@thespec.com

905-526-3392 | @CarmatTheSpec