Rob Ford’s daughter Stephanie remembers her dad, now the ‘mayor of heaven’

News Mar 30, 2016 by David Nickle Etobicoke Guardian

“I know he’s in a better way now, and he’s the mayor of heaven now. I know that he will be with us forever. I love him so much.”

With those words, 10-year-old Stephanie Ford said goodbye to her father, former Mayor Rob Ford, in front of nearly 1,000 of his friends, colleagues, family members and constituents in the heart of St. James Cathedral on King Street.

Ford, 46, died on March 22 after a long battle with cancer.

— InsideToronto (@InsideTOnews) March 30, 2016

And after a two-day visitation at Toronto City Hall, Stephanie, her younger brother Dougie and the close-knit Ford family brought his casket in a procession to the cathedral. Stephanie spoke lovingly of her father, who she described as “a great mayor. He helped a lot of people.

• RELATED: Hundreds of Ford Nation faithful wave flags, sing hymns in honour of late mayor

“He was also an amazing dad. He was so nice to us, but also strict sometimes like a dad should be. He would buy us the best toys and take us to amazing places, but what matters is we were happy together. I remember at the hospital, he smiled at me and he said ‘Stephanie, I might not be here for too much longer’ he said, ‘but I want you to remember I would always love you’.”

Stephanie’s words nearly brought Ford’s outspoken brother Doug Ford to tears as he stood up to eulogize Rob Ford. “I want to start off telling Stephanie that you’ll always be taken care of, always be loved, and you have thousands of people who will love you back and take care of you,” he said.

Doug spoke at length about his brother, who for many years he operated in a political partnership with. In 2010, Doug ran Rob’s mayoral campaign and then joined him on council in Rob’s old Ward 2 seat.

From the front of the church, he sang Rob Ford’s praises, telling stories of his legendary devotion to dealing with constituents’ calls. And he pointed out that Ford had a very broad notion of what a constituent was.

“Rob truly believed he was the mayor of Canada, not the mayor of Toronto,” Doug said. “I walked into his office once and he was talking to a constituent. In Edmonton. I said ‘Rob, now who are you talking to?’ ‘We have a supporter in Edmonton, they have a problem’. I said ‘that’s his problem’, and he said ‘No, I’m going to call the mayor of Edmonton and get him to take care of it’”.

Former Ontario premier Mike Harris started off the eulogies, talking about the unique virtues of Rob, whose father Doug Ford Sr., served in Harris’ first term in power as head of the Progressive Conservative Party, in 1995.

He noted that his words were scant tribute to Rob, compared to the outpouring of grief and support over the past three days.

“The real tribute to Rob wasn’t to have me come up here,” he said. “The real tribute was the line of people who waited in the rain Monday to pay tribute to the man that was in their mind synonymous with Toronto. They all took the time to come together to pay respects and say goodbye. The real tribute was in the humble bungalow whose owner had the sign of Rob Ford for Mayor with the handwritten words, ‘we will miss him.’ Or the local businessman who called Rob about a zoning problem, only to have him show up at his shop so he could better understand the issue. Or the elderly lady who called very early in the morning because the truth is she was lonely and just needed someone to talk to.”

Ford was also honored by a Who’s Who of political and business leaders. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, a frequent opponent of the Fords, attended, as did Mayor John Tory and former mayors David Miller and Mel Lastman. Many of Ford’s colleagues on Toronto council were also in attendance, as were business leaders like Porter Airlines owner Bob DeLuce.

Andrew Asbil, Rector of the Cathedral and Dean of Toronto, likened the long goodbye Torontonians afforded the former mayor with the Last Supper, as related in the Book of John – which is related over five chapters.

“There are moments in our lives where we pine to do the same thing we pine to slow everything down, especially in sorrow and tribulation,” he said. “This is such a moment. Over the last few days thousands on thousands of ordinary men and women have taken the time to write words of condolences. Today, thousands have come parading, cramming into this old building, under tents to take a moment to savour and remember.”

Asbil was the only one to reference Ford’s troubles during his tenure as mayor – troubles that included the revelation of drug and alcohol abuse.

“You or I will never have the same notoriety or popularity or household fame as Rob Ford,” he said. “You or I will never have our names uttered around a dinner table, as Rob Ford has. Very few of us know the feeling of living our failings and weaknesses in such a public way as Rob Ford. And very few of us will know what it’s like to experience the love and admiration of what we do, as Rob Ford did.”

Ford was afforded a full Anglican funeral, with Toronto jazz singer Liberty Silver delivering a from-the-heart rendition of Amazing Grace, and the Choir of St. James Cathedral closing out the ceremony with a celestial performance of “Swing Low Sweet Chariot.”

Ford was interred in a private ceremony attended by close family following the funeral.

Rob Ford’s daughter Stephanie remembers her dad, now the ‘mayor of heaven’

More than a 1,000 dignitaries, family and friends fill St. James Cathedral

News Mar 30, 2016 by David Nickle Etobicoke Guardian

“I know he’s in a better way now, and he’s the mayor of heaven now. I know that he will be with us forever. I love him so much.”

With those words, 10-year-old Stephanie Ford said goodbye to her father, former Mayor Rob Ford, in front of nearly 1,000 of his friends, colleagues, family members and constituents in the heart of St. James Cathedral on King Street.

Ford, 46, died on March 22 after a long battle with cancer.

And after a two-day visitation at Toronto City Hall, Stephanie, her younger brother Dougie and the close-knit Ford family brought his casket in a procession to the cathedral. Stephanie spoke lovingly of her father, who she described as “a great mayor. He helped a lot of people.

• RELATED: Hundreds of Ford Nation faithful wave flags, sing hymns in honour of late mayor

“He was also an amazing dad. He was so nice to us, but also strict sometimes like a dad should be. He would buy us the best toys and take us to amazing places, but what matters is we were happy together. I remember at the hospital, he smiled at me and he said ‘Stephanie, I might not be here for too much longer’ he said, ‘but I want you to remember I would always love you’.”

Stephanie’s words nearly brought Ford’s outspoken brother Doug Ford to tears as he stood up to eulogize Rob Ford. “I want to start off telling Stephanie that you’ll always be taken care of, always be loved, and you have thousands of people who will love you back and take care of you,” he said.

Doug spoke at length about his brother, who for many years he operated in a political partnership with. In 2010, Doug ran Rob’s mayoral campaign and then joined him on council in Rob’s old Ward 2 seat.

From the front of the church, he sang Rob Ford’s praises, telling stories of his legendary devotion to dealing with constituents’ calls. And he pointed out that Ford had a very broad notion of what a constituent was.

“Rob truly believed he was the mayor of Canada, not the mayor of Toronto,” Doug said. “I walked into his office once and he was talking to a constituent. In Edmonton. I said ‘Rob, now who are you talking to?’ ‘We have a supporter in Edmonton, they have a problem’. I said ‘that’s his problem’, and he said ‘No, I’m going to call the mayor of Edmonton and get him to take care of it’”.

Former Ontario premier Mike Harris started off the eulogies, talking about the unique virtues of Rob, whose father Doug Ford Sr., served in Harris’ first term in power as head of the Progressive Conservative Party, in 1995.

He noted that his words were scant tribute to Rob, compared to the outpouring of grief and support over the past three days.

“The real tribute to Rob wasn’t to have me come up here,” he said. “The real tribute was the line of people who waited in the rain Monday to pay tribute to the man that was in their mind synonymous with Toronto. They all took the time to come together to pay respects and say goodbye. The real tribute was in the humble bungalow whose owner had the sign of Rob Ford for Mayor with the handwritten words, ‘we will miss him.’ Or the local businessman who called Rob about a zoning problem, only to have him show up at his shop so he could better understand the issue. Or the elderly lady who called very early in the morning because the truth is she was lonely and just needed someone to talk to.”

Ford was also honored by a Who’s Who of political and business leaders. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, a frequent opponent of the Fords, attended, as did Mayor John Tory and former mayors David Miller and Mel Lastman. Many of Ford’s colleagues on Toronto council were also in attendance, as were business leaders like Porter Airlines owner Bob DeLuce.

Andrew Asbil, Rector of the Cathedral and Dean of Toronto, likened the long goodbye Torontonians afforded the former mayor with the Last Supper, as related in the Book of John – which is related over five chapters.

“There are moments in our lives where we pine to do the same thing we pine to slow everything down, especially in sorrow and tribulation,” he said. “This is such a moment. Over the last few days thousands on thousands of ordinary men and women have taken the time to write words of condolences. Today, thousands have come parading, cramming into this old building, under tents to take a moment to savour and remember.”

Asbil was the only one to reference Ford’s troubles during his tenure as mayor – troubles that included the revelation of drug and alcohol abuse.

“You or I will never have the same notoriety or popularity or household fame as Rob Ford,” he said. “You or I will never have our names uttered around a dinner table, as Rob Ford has. Very few of us know the feeling of living our failings and weaknesses in such a public way as Rob Ford. And very few of us will know what it’s like to experience the love and admiration of what we do, as Rob Ford did.”

Ford was afforded a full Anglican funeral, with Toronto jazz singer Liberty Silver delivering a from-the-heart rendition of Amazing Grace, and the Choir of St. James Cathedral closing out the ceremony with a celestial performance of “Swing Low Sweet Chariot.”

Ford was interred in a private ceremony attended by close family following the funeral.

Rob Ford’s daughter Stephanie remembers her dad, now the ‘mayor of heaven’

More than a 1,000 dignitaries, family and friends fill St. James Cathedral

News Mar 30, 2016 by David Nickle Etobicoke Guardian

“I know he’s in a better way now, and he’s the mayor of heaven now. I know that he will be with us forever. I love him so much.”

With those words, 10-year-old Stephanie Ford said goodbye to her father, former Mayor Rob Ford, in front of nearly 1,000 of his friends, colleagues, family members and constituents in the heart of St. James Cathedral on King Street.

Ford, 46, died on March 22 after a long battle with cancer.

And after a two-day visitation at Toronto City Hall, Stephanie, her younger brother Dougie and the close-knit Ford family brought his casket in a procession to the cathedral. Stephanie spoke lovingly of her father, who she described as “a great mayor. He helped a lot of people.

• RELATED: Hundreds of Ford Nation faithful wave flags, sing hymns in honour of late mayor

“He was also an amazing dad. He was so nice to us, but also strict sometimes like a dad should be. He would buy us the best toys and take us to amazing places, but what matters is we were happy together. I remember at the hospital, he smiled at me and he said ‘Stephanie, I might not be here for too much longer’ he said, ‘but I want you to remember I would always love you’.”

Stephanie’s words nearly brought Ford’s outspoken brother Doug Ford to tears as he stood up to eulogize Rob Ford. “I want to start off telling Stephanie that you’ll always be taken care of, always be loved, and you have thousands of people who will love you back and take care of you,” he said.

Doug spoke at length about his brother, who for many years he operated in a political partnership with. In 2010, Doug ran Rob’s mayoral campaign and then joined him on council in Rob’s old Ward 2 seat.

From the front of the church, he sang Rob Ford’s praises, telling stories of his legendary devotion to dealing with constituents’ calls. And he pointed out that Ford had a very broad notion of what a constituent was.

“Rob truly believed he was the mayor of Canada, not the mayor of Toronto,” Doug said. “I walked into his office once and he was talking to a constituent. In Edmonton. I said ‘Rob, now who are you talking to?’ ‘We have a supporter in Edmonton, they have a problem’. I said ‘that’s his problem’, and he said ‘No, I’m going to call the mayor of Edmonton and get him to take care of it’”.

Former Ontario premier Mike Harris started off the eulogies, talking about the unique virtues of Rob, whose father Doug Ford Sr., served in Harris’ first term in power as head of the Progressive Conservative Party, in 1995.

He noted that his words were scant tribute to Rob, compared to the outpouring of grief and support over the past three days.

“The real tribute to Rob wasn’t to have me come up here,” he said. “The real tribute was the line of people who waited in the rain Monday to pay tribute to the man that was in their mind synonymous with Toronto. They all took the time to come together to pay respects and say goodbye. The real tribute was in the humble bungalow whose owner had the sign of Rob Ford for Mayor with the handwritten words, ‘we will miss him.’ Or the local businessman who called Rob about a zoning problem, only to have him show up at his shop so he could better understand the issue. Or the elderly lady who called very early in the morning because the truth is she was lonely and just needed someone to talk to.”

Ford was also honored by a Who’s Who of political and business leaders. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, a frequent opponent of the Fords, attended, as did Mayor John Tory and former mayors David Miller and Mel Lastman. Many of Ford’s colleagues on Toronto council were also in attendance, as were business leaders like Porter Airlines owner Bob DeLuce.

Andrew Asbil, Rector of the Cathedral and Dean of Toronto, likened the long goodbye Torontonians afforded the former mayor with the Last Supper, as related in the Book of John – which is related over five chapters.

“There are moments in our lives where we pine to do the same thing we pine to slow everything down, especially in sorrow and tribulation,” he said. “This is such a moment. Over the last few days thousands on thousands of ordinary men and women have taken the time to write words of condolences. Today, thousands have come parading, cramming into this old building, under tents to take a moment to savour and remember.”

Asbil was the only one to reference Ford’s troubles during his tenure as mayor – troubles that included the revelation of drug and alcohol abuse.

“You or I will never have the same notoriety or popularity or household fame as Rob Ford,” he said. “You or I will never have our names uttered around a dinner table, as Rob Ford has. Very few of us know the feeling of living our failings and weaknesses in such a public way as Rob Ford. And very few of us will know what it’s like to experience the love and admiration of what we do, as Rob Ford did.”

Ford was afforded a full Anglican funeral, with Toronto jazz singer Liberty Silver delivering a from-the-heart rendition of Amazing Grace, and the Choir of St. James Cathedral closing out the ceremony with a celestial performance of “Swing Low Sweet Chariot.”

Ford was interred in a private ceremony attended by close family following the funeral.