McMaster to get more than $20 million to study chronic disease

News Mar 30, 2016 by Joanna Frketich The Hamilton Spectator

Canada's Health Minister is expected to give McMaster University more than $20 million for chronic disease research Thursday.

Health Minister Jane Philpott will be at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute in the morning to announce grants to researchers across the country as part of Canada's Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR).

SPOR approved $62.25 million in grants during a review process between October 2015 and January 2016 to be split equally between five networks studying chronic disease.

McMaster researchers received two of the $12.45-million grants for a total of $24.9 million over five years from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The chronic pain network headed by Dr. Norman Buckley will give those suffering from continual pain an ability to work with researchers, health care professionals, educators and policy-makers to increase access to better care and get research findings to the bedside faster.

It's significant considering the cost of chronic pain to society is greater than cancer and heart disease combined. Canada is one of the highest producers per capita of pain studies but dedicates far less funding to research than other countries.

The IMAGINE-SPOR chronic disease network, headed by Dr. Paul Moayyedi, will bring researchers across Canada together to study gut bacteria and diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. It will aim to make changes to diet, probiotics, fecal transplants and antibiotics to improve symptoms and the mental health of patients.

Canada has the highest rates in the world for these diseases that cost the health care system $7.7 billion per year.

The other networks went to the University of British Columbia to study chronic kidney disease, the University of Toronto to research diabetes and McGill University Health Centre for children with brain-based developmental disabilities.

jfrketich@thespec.com

905-526-3349 | @Jfrketich

McMaster to get more than $20 million to study chronic disease

News Mar 30, 2016 by Joanna Frketich The Hamilton Spectator

Canada's Health Minister is expected to give McMaster University more than $20 million for chronic disease research Thursday.

Health Minister Jane Philpott will be at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute in the morning to announce grants to researchers across the country as part of Canada's Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR).

SPOR approved $62.25 million in grants during a review process between October 2015 and January 2016 to be split equally between five networks studying chronic disease.

McMaster researchers received two of the $12.45-million grants for a total of $24.9 million over five years from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The chronic pain network headed by Dr. Norman Buckley will give those suffering from continual pain an ability to work with researchers, health care professionals, educators and policy-makers to increase access to better care and get research findings to the bedside faster.

It's significant considering the cost of chronic pain to society is greater than cancer and heart disease combined. Canada is one of the highest producers per capita of pain studies but dedicates far less funding to research than other countries.

The IMAGINE-SPOR chronic disease network, headed by Dr. Paul Moayyedi, will bring researchers across Canada together to study gut bacteria and diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. It will aim to make changes to diet, probiotics, fecal transplants and antibiotics to improve symptoms and the mental health of patients.

Canada has the highest rates in the world for these diseases that cost the health care system $7.7 billion per year.

The other networks went to the University of British Columbia to study chronic kidney disease, the University of Toronto to research diabetes and McGill University Health Centre for children with brain-based developmental disabilities.

jfrketich@thespec.com

905-526-3349 | @Jfrketich

McMaster to get more than $20 million to study chronic disease

News Mar 30, 2016 by Joanna Frketich The Hamilton Spectator

Canada's Health Minister is expected to give McMaster University more than $20 million for chronic disease research Thursday.

Health Minister Jane Philpott will be at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute in the morning to announce grants to researchers across the country as part of Canada's Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR).

SPOR approved $62.25 million in grants during a review process between October 2015 and January 2016 to be split equally between five networks studying chronic disease.

McMaster researchers received two of the $12.45-million grants for a total of $24.9 million over five years from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The chronic pain network headed by Dr. Norman Buckley will give those suffering from continual pain an ability to work with researchers, health care professionals, educators and policy-makers to increase access to better care and get research findings to the bedside faster.

It's significant considering the cost of chronic pain to society is greater than cancer and heart disease combined. Canada is one of the highest producers per capita of pain studies but dedicates far less funding to research than other countries.

The IMAGINE-SPOR chronic disease network, headed by Dr. Paul Moayyedi, will bring researchers across Canada together to study gut bacteria and diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. It will aim to make changes to diet, probiotics, fecal transplants and antibiotics to improve symptoms and the mental health of patients.

Canada has the highest rates in the world for these diseases that cost the health care system $7.7 billion per year.

The other networks went to the University of British Columbia to study chronic kidney disease, the University of Toronto to research diabetes and McGill University Health Centre for children with brain-based developmental disabilities.

jfrketich@thespec.com

905-526-3349 | @Jfrketich