BOSMA: Accused killer Millard and worker nicknamed the Eliminator ‘the BBQ’

News Apr 01, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard and his mechanic had nicknamed it "the BBQ" — an animal cremator the Crown alleges was used to burn Tim Bosma's body.

The reference was made in text messages between the two, shown to the jury Thursday when Shane Schlatman returned to the stand at the first-degree murder trial of Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28.

The pair are co-accused in the death of Ancaster's Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in the pickup truck he was selling online.

The Crown alleges Bosma was shot in his truck that night and then incinerated in the cremator outside the hangar at Millard's business, Millardair.

Schlatman was the mechanic at Millardair. He ordered the $15,000 incinerator on Millard's behalf in 2012.

On Thursday, the jury saw two text messages between the two in which reference is made to "the BBQ." On March 15, 2013, Millard asks him: "Ballpark, what was cost of material on BBQ trailer?"

On April 27, Millard — asking about the whereabouts of a large generator — says "unless you remember putting it back on the BBQ it should be at the hangar."

In both cases, Schlatman explained that was a reference to the cremator, brand name The Eliminator.

During cross-examination, Millard's counsel Nadir Sachak asked Schlatman about his relationship with his boss. They were friendly but did not socialize much outside of work.

"So you're here and you're not lying are you?" Sachak asked him. "You're not giving evidence that's favourable to Millard?" Schlatman said he was being honest.

Asked about Millard's explanation to him for purchasing the incinerator back in 2012, Schlatman agreed Millard had referenced his veterinarian uncle and a plan to go into the animal cremation business — but didn't specifically say he was going into business with his uncle.

Any suggestion that Millard claimed such a partnership, Sachak told him, would be "false, inaccurate and downright wrong."

Sachak also asked the mechanic about business at Millardair — which has been painted so far in the trial as virtually non-existent. The jury has heard no airplanes used the hangar, and no income was coming in.

But Sachak suggested this was because the hangar was only fully completed in late 2012, and that they had also been waiting on a government licence.

He said that after Millard was arrested on May 10, 2013, airplanes did rent out the hangar — and suggested they were paying $1,500 a night to do so.

Schlatman — who remained on the payroll for two years after Millard's arrest until the hangar was sold last year — agreed they did, but couldn't say how much they were paying.

Sachak also asked about the black pickup truck — Bosma's truck — that Schlatman saw in the hangar when he arrived to work on May 8, 2013 (after receiving a text from Millard the day before, telling him not to come to the hangar for any reason).

"It was not covered, not concealed, not camouflaged in any way?" Sachak asked him.

It was not, Schlatman agreed.

The jury has heard that Millard told Schlatman he got the truck in Kitchener.

He and Millard discussed the truck on May 9, he said Thursday. "I can't stop thinking about what that family's going through," Millard texted him that night.

On Monday, when the trial resumes, Smich's counsel will take their turn with Schlatman.

News services

BOSMA: Accused killer Millard and worker nicknamed the Eliminator ‘the BBQ’

News Apr 01, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard and his mechanic had nicknamed it "the BBQ" — an animal cremator the Crown alleges was used to burn Tim Bosma's body.

The reference was made in text messages between the two, shown to the jury Thursday when Shane Schlatman returned to the stand at the first-degree murder trial of Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28.

The pair are co-accused in the death of Ancaster's Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in the pickup truck he was selling online.

The Crown alleges Bosma was shot in his truck that night and then incinerated in the cremator outside the hangar at Millard's business, Millardair.

Schlatman was the mechanic at Millardair. He ordered the $15,000 incinerator on Millard's behalf in 2012.

On Thursday, the jury saw two text messages between the two in which reference is made to "the BBQ." On March 15, 2013, Millard asks him: "Ballpark, what was cost of material on BBQ trailer?"

On April 27, Millard — asking about the whereabouts of a large generator — says "unless you remember putting it back on the BBQ it should be at the hangar."

In both cases, Schlatman explained that was a reference to the cremator, brand name The Eliminator.

During cross-examination, Millard's counsel Nadir Sachak asked Schlatman about his relationship with his boss. They were friendly but did not socialize much outside of work.

"So you're here and you're not lying are you?" Sachak asked him. "You're not giving evidence that's favourable to Millard?" Schlatman said he was being honest.

Asked about Millard's explanation to him for purchasing the incinerator back in 2012, Schlatman agreed Millard had referenced his veterinarian uncle and a plan to go into the animal cremation business — but didn't specifically say he was going into business with his uncle.

Any suggestion that Millard claimed such a partnership, Sachak told him, would be "false, inaccurate and downright wrong."

Sachak also asked the mechanic about business at Millardair — which has been painted so far in the trial as virtually non-existent. The jury has heard no airplanes used the hangar, and no income was coming in.

But Sachak suggested this was because the hangar was only fully completed in late 2012, and that they had also been waiting on a government licence.

He said that after Millard was arrested on May 10, 2013, airplanes did rent out the hangar — and suggested they were paying $1,500 a night to do so.

Schlatman — who remained on the payroll for two years after Millard's arrest until the hangar was sold last year — agreed they did, but couldn't say how much they were paying.

Sachak also asked about the black pickup truck — Bosma's truck — that Schlatman saw in the hangar when he arrived to work on May 8, 2013 (after receiving a text from Millard the day before, telling him not to come to the hangar for any reason).

"It was not covered, not concealed, not camouflaged in any way?" Sachak asked him.

It was not, Schlatman agreed.

The jury has heard that Millard told Schlatman he got the truck in Kitchener.

He and Millard discussed the truck on May 9, he said Thursday. "I can't stop thinking about what that family's going through," Millard texted him that night.

On Monday, when the trial resumes, Smich's counsel will take their turn with Schlatman.

News services

BOSMA: Accused killer Millard and worker nicknamed the Eliminator ‘the BBQ’

News Apr 01, 2016 by Molly Hayes Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard and his mechanic had nicknamed it "the BBQ" — an animal cremator the Crown alleges was used to burn Tim Bosma's body.

The reference was made in text messages between the two, shown to the jury Thursday when Shane Schlatman returned to the stand at the first-degree murder trial of Millard, 30, and his friend Mark Smich, 28.

The pair are co-accused in the death of Ancaster's Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in the pickup truck he was selling online.

The Crown alleges Bosma was shot in his truck that night and then incinerated in the cremator outside the hangar at Millard's business, Millardair.

Schlatman was the mechanic at Millardair. He ordered the $15,000 incinerator on Millard's behalf in 2012.

On Thursday, the jury saw two text messages between the two in which reference is made to "the BBQ." On March 15, 2013, Millard asks him: "Ballpark, what was cost of material on BBQ trailer?"

On April 27, Millard — asking about the whereabouts of a large generator — says "unless you remember putting it back on the BBQ it should be at the hangar."

In both cases, Schlatman explained that was a reference to the cremator, brand name The Eliminator.

During cross-examination, Millard's counsel Nadir Sachak asked Schlatman about his relationship with his boss. They were friendly but did not socialize much outside of work.

"So you're here and you're not lying are you?" Sachak asked him. "You're not giving evidence that's favourable to Millard?" Schlatman said he was being honest.

Asked about Millard's explanation to him for purchasing the incinerator back in 2012, Schlatman agreed Millard had referenced his veterinarian uncle and a plan to go into the animal cremation business — but didn't specifically say he was going into business with his uncle.

Any suggestion that Millard claimed such a partnership, Sachak told him, would be "false, inaccurate and downright wrong."

Sachak also asked the mechanic about business at Millardair — which has been painted so far in the trial as virtually non-existent. The jury has heard no airplanes used the hangar, and no income was coming in.

But Sachak suggested this was because the hangar was only fully completed in late 2012, and that they had also been waiting on a government licence.

He said that after Millard was arrested on May 10, 2013, airplanes did rent out the hangar — and suggested they were paying $1,500 a night to do so.

Schlatman — who remained on the payroll for two years after Millard's arrest until the hangar was sold last year — agreed they did, but couldn't say how much they were paying.

Sachak also asked about the black pickup truck — Bosma's truck — that Schlatman saw in the hangar when he arrived to work on May 8, 2013 (after receiving a text from Millard the day before, telling him not to come to the hangar for any reason).

"It was not covered, not concealed, not camouflaged in any way?" Sachak asked him.

It was not, Schlatman agreed.

The jury has heard that Millard told Schlatman he got the truck in Kitchener.

He and Millard discussed the truck on May 9, he said Thursday. "I can't stop thinking about what that family's going through," Millard texted him that night.

On Monday, when the trial resumes, Smich's counsel will take their turn with Schlatman.

News services